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arrêté (EC terminology)

English translation: decree

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17:25 Jan 8, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents / EU language
French term or phrase: arrêté (EC terminology)
For example arrêté du 5 juillet 1999:

I am hqving problems finding the recognised English equivalent (Eurodicautom gives both "order" and "decree")
transatgees
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:03
English translation:decree
Explanation:
Arrêté isn't a term used in EU legislation (which has directives[directives], règlements [regulations] and décisions [decisions]). That being the case, you have a fair amount of latitude in how you translate the term. I tend to use decree unless "décreté" is used in the same text, in which case I'd go for "order".

BTW, FHS Bridge also suggests regulation, decision and notice, but the first two of these aren't suitable because, as mentioned before, they are used for specific types of legislation.

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Note added at 13 mins (2004-01-08 17:38:29 GMT)
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Sorry, I meant \"décret\", not \"décreté\".

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Note added at 27 mins (2004-01-08 17:52:14 GMT)
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See my answer for décret - you\'d better use \"order\" here.
Selected response from:

Gillian Hargreaves
Local time: 19:03
Grading comment
After seeing your point about arrêté not being a term in EU legislation, I queried this with the client. They admitted that the text was badly written and gave a false impression that EU legislation was involved here; in fact it refers to french legislation.

Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1decree
Gillian Hargreaves
4 +1order, decree
Mihaela Sinca


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
order, decree


Explanation:
la terminologie europeenne

Mihaela Sinca
Local time: 21:03
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in pair: 73

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Giulia Barontini
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
arrêté (EC terminology)
decree


Explanation:
Arrêté isn't a term used in EU legislation (which has directives[directives], règlements [regulations] and décisions [decisions]). That being the case, you have a fair amount of latitude in how you translate the term. I tend to use decree unless "décreté" is used in the same text, in which case I'd go for "order".

BTW, FHS Bridge also suggests regulation, decision and notice, but the first two of these aren't suitable because, as mentioned before, they are used for specific types of legislation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 mins (2004-01-08 17:38:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, I meant \"décret\", not \"décreté\".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 27 mins (2004-01-08 17:52:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

See my answer for décret - you\'d better use \"order\" here.

Gillian Hargreaves
Local time: 19:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 575
Grading comment
After seeing your point about arrêté not being a term in EU legislation, I queried this with the client. They admitted that the text was badly written and gave a false impression that EU legislation was involved here; in fact it refers to french legislation.

Thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sarah Walls: Yes, order
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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