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escalade des locaux

English translation: climbing up the external/outside walls (of the premises)

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14:46 Jul 26, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
French term or phrase: escalade des locaux
In an extract from an insurance policy document:

"Vol commis par effraction extérieure, escalade des locaux ou avec forcement de leurs systèmes de fermeture par usage de fausses clés."

I know what it means, but what is the equivalent English term?

Would it be 'forced entry'?

Many thanks,

Julia
jgal
Local time: 08:11
English translation:climbing up the external/outside walls (of the premises)
Explanation:
First thing to point out here is the translation of the term “Vol commis par effraction extérieure » which, in a word, is « burglary » (with or without intent, depending on context).

The offence committed here is that of "burglary". Under the Theft Act 1968 this is defined as :
- entering a building (for example) as a trespasser with the intention of committing one of four specified crimes (theft, inflicting GBH, criminal damage or rape) = "burglary with intent" ;
- entering a building as a trespasser only but subsequently committing one of two specified crimes : stealing or attempting to steal, inflicting or attempting to inflict GBH = “burglary without intent”.

As an entry can only be made from the inside, then this covers the "effraction extérieure".

“escalade des locaux” just means that the person entered the premises from the outside (which makes it a burglary under the English legal meaning) either by climbing up the walls of the premises or by forcing entry using false keys.

Extracts of the Act easily available on the web if you fancy some late-night reading!
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 08:11
Grading comment
Thanks, Nikki,

I'm on the verge of sending you the whole thing! ;-D
It's for Monday, but as I've got a pile of other work to do, I'm trying to get this one out of the way ASAP...

Bonne nuit,

Julia
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1climbing over, jumping fences, obstaclesDrSantos
naclimbing up the external/outside walls (of the premises)
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
naExtra bits
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
natrespass?
Guy Bray
naforced entry
Parrot
nabreak in
Alexandra Hague
na -1breaking and entering
Alexandra Hague


  

Answers


9 mins
break in


Explanation:
Just a suggestion though "forced entry" sounds more appropriate in the context.
Bye,
Alix

Alexandra Hague
Local time: 08:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 116
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19 mins peer agreement (net): -1
breaking and entering


Explanation:
Just another suggestion.
Robert/Collins:
jur. effraction

Alexandra Hague
Local time: 08:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 116

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: In answer to the question asked, "escalade" is referring to climbing up/over walls, barriers, fences of the premises.
1 hr
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21 mins peer agreement (net): +1
climbing over, jumping fences, obstacles


Explanation:
it is "forced entry" or "break in" - alright, but the way it is said it looks to me that is "jumping over a fence, climbing over", or "using steps to reach high places (windows).
ESCALADE = climbing.


    just a suggestion
DrSantos
Local time: 08:11
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: For the specific question asked, this is a clear and correct answer in my view.
1 hr
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33 mins
forced entry


Explanation:
This really covers more possibilities from a police point of view than simply breaking in, which seems to be the idea from your context.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 08:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1861
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58 mins
trespass?


Explanation:
"effraction" is breaking & entering, then you have forcing the locks, so "escalade" can only mean an entry without breaking or force, e.g, climbing over a fence. I don't know what the technical term would be, and trespass is "intrusion" or "violation de propriete", butit sounds like trespass or illegal entry.

Guy Bray
United States
Local time: 23:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 819

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Alexandra Hague: The text indicates that the entry was indeed forced.
18 mins

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: This is an essential element of the crime of the offence of burglary, but is not the whole story.
32 mins
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1 hr
climbing up the external/outside walls (of the premises)


Explanation:
First thing to point out here is the translation of the term “Vol commis par effraction extérieure » which, in a word, is « burglary » (with or without intent, depending on context).

The offence committed here is that of "burglary". Under the Theft Act 1968 this is defined as :
- entering a building (for example) as a trespasser with the intention of committing one of four specified crimes (theft, inflicting GBH, criminal damage or rape) = "burglary with intent" ;
- entering a building as a trespasser only but subsequently committing one of two specified crimes : stealing or attempting to steal, inflicting or attempting to inflict GBH = “burglary without intent”.

As an entry can only be made from the inside, then this covers the "effraction extérieure".

“escalade des locaux” just means that the person entered the premises from the outside (which makes it a burglary under the English legal meaning) either by climbing up the walls of the premises or by forcing entry using false keys.

Extracts of the Act easily available on the web if you fancy some late-night reading!



    Oxford Dictionary of Law, OUP
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 08:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
Grading comment
Thanks, Nikki,

I'm on the verge of sending you the whole thing! ;-D
It's for Monday, but as I've got a pile of other work to do, I'm trying to get this one out of the way ASAP...

Bonne nuit,

Julia
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
Extra bits


Explanation:
PS : Third type of burglary, aggravated burglary, (with firearm), not relevant here form infor given.

Just a couple of zillions of sources out there for you to check out my previous answer :


http://law.rainertech.co.uk/theft.htm

s9 Theft Act 1968 - "Burglary"
This offence is committed by any person who enters any building or part of a building as a trespasser with intent to steal, inflict GBH on any person therein, rape any woman or cause damage therein OR having entered in such circumstances steals, attempts to steal or inflicts GBH on any person therein.

This is an Arrestable Offence.


http://www.sweetandmaxwell.co.uk/academic/nutshells/Criminal...

Has he committed burglary? Theft Act 1968, s. 9. Section 9(1)(a) requires entry as a trespasser with intent to commit theft. What was his intent when he entered? If on entering he did not intend to commit theft, did he commit theft subsequently so as to make him guilty of burglary under section 9(1)(b)?



Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 08:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
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