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comptant

English translation: including

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03:20 Aug 15, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
French term or phrase: comptant
Le solde, comptant le jour de la signature de l'acte authentique

I just want to check if they are asking for the balance in cash or if the comptant has something to do with 'a compter de'??
Agius Language & Translation
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:21
English translation:including
Explanation:
If there were an error in the punctuation, then it could be taken to read "Le solde comptant" but then the rest would not fit. It would have to read "au jour de la signature..." for example.

comptant (adverb) = cash, in cash
ex : payer comptant = pay cash, pay in cash

comptant (noun) = cash
ex : payer au comptant = pay in cash

Two different ways of saying the same thing. But that is beside the point here.

I think sense can best be made of this one taking the verb "compter" as a starting point, from which "comptant" meaning "counting" ie : "including" is to be understood. When you think about it, whenever a payment is to be made, the amount to be paid over at a given date has to be estblished. Those concerned need to know where they stand.

It cannot be "à partir de". How can you have a balance outstanding/due starting from a particular date? The whole idea behind this phrase is that a fixed point in time is being established.
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 09:21
Grading comment
Thanks - sorry I caused such a debate!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +2including
Mats Wiman
na +2Robert on this: Comptant = 1. Qu'on compte sur-le champ.
Parrot
nataking into accountmckinnc
naFurther comments - partiularly for Paola!
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
naas of
Germaine A Hoston
naas at, on
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
naincluding
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
naTo Mr Dusty,
Mats Wiman
na -1the balance in cash on the day of completion
Tony M
na -2consideringMarcus Malabad
na -2starting from
CLS Lexi-tech


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


2 mins peer agreement (net): -2
considering


Explanation:
I think it comes from the verb 'compter' (your second choice).

The amount, considering the date of signing...

Marcus Malabad
Canada
Local time: 09:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TagalogTagalog
PRO pts in pair: 390

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: WRONG !
27 mins
  -> no shouting! ;-)

disagree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: It comes from the vb 'compter' but means 'taking into account', 'including'. With sums due, the right terms-"as at" "on"
2 hrs
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6 mins peer agreement (net): -2
starting from


Explanation:
starting from

Syn.
as from


Terme(s) apparenté(s)
reckoning from
counting from
take effect on, to
with effect from
Déf. :
À partir de, à dater de.

Grand dictionnaire terminologique

regards

Paola L M



CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 03:21
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 162

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Sorry, I think this is wrong again!
23 mins

disagree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: No, the date is being fixed, stopped. It is not a date from which something is to run. Interest runs, balances are set.
1 hr
  -> Do you mean, counting from, taking effect from as in GDT above?
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13 mins peer agreement (net): +2
including


Explanation:
The balance, including the day of signing the ....


    MMI
Mats Wiman
Sweden
Local time: 09:21
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
PRO pts in pair: 133

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  roberhenri: This has the most sense per the given context.
12 mins

disagree  Tony M: I don't believe so!
17 mins

agree  CLS Lexi-tech: I had looked up "à compter de" to give meaning of "compter" but Mats has it right. Paola
45 mins

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Right meaning wrong word - Cecilia gets it right
2 hrs
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31 mins peer agreement (net): -1
the balance in cash on the day of completion


Explanation:
usually, in this context, the cash balance paid is one of the conditions for proper completion of the sale.

At least, that's the way I've always understood it!

Tony M
France
Local time: 09:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14157

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  CLS Lexi-tech: Wouldn't this be "en comptant" to mean "cash"?
27 mins

disagree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: on the day is the right meaning. But this has nothing to do with cash!
46 mins

agree  VBaby: Payer comptant has always meant pay in cash, as opposed to payer à crédit; it has everything to do with cash!
5 hrs
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45 mins
To Mr Dusty,


Explanation:
Dear Mr Dusty,
No one is interested in your condemnations. The asker is the only judge.
Comments in this community are in most cases friendly and/or encouraging.
Critical comments are also welcome, but they should edify, not condemn and preferably be accompanied by a constructive counter-proposal, hopefully more enlightened.

Yours sincerely
Mats Wiman
German-Swedish Moderator

Mats Wiman
Sweden
Local time: 09:21
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
PRO pts in pair: 133

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  CLS Lexi-tech
14 mins

disagree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Perhaps not very constructive either!
1 hr
  -> You say it's inconstructive to ask somebody to be constructive?
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1 hr peer agreement (net): +2
Robert on this: Comptant = 1. Qu'on compte sur-le champ.


Explanation:
Argent comptant: payés sur l'heure et en espèces.

I suggest "Balance as of".


    Robert
Parrot
Spain
Local time: 09:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1861

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Bingo! balance due as at/as of
4 mins

agree  CLS Lexi-tech: Does "as of" mean "starting from", à compter de? http://www.xrefer.com/entry.jsp?xrefid=629111&secid=.-
19 mins
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1 hr
including


Explanation:
If there were an error in the punctuation, then it could be taken to read "Le solde comptant" but then the rest would not fit. It would have to read "au jour de la signature..." for example.

comptant (adverb) = cash, in cash
ex : payer comptant = pay cash, pay in cash

comptant (noun) = cash
ex : payer au comptant = pay in cash

Two different ways of saying the same thing. But that is beside the point here.

I think sense can best be made of this one taking the verb "compter" as a starting point, from which "comptant" meaning "counting" ie : "including" is to be understood. When you think about it, whenever a payment is to be made, the amount to be paid over at a given date has to be estblished. Those concerned need to know where they stand.

It cannot be "à partir de". How can you have a balance outstanding/due starting from a particular date? The whole idea behind this phrase is that a fixed point in time is being established.

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 09:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
Grading comment
Thanks - sorry I caused such a debate!
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1 hr
as at, on


Explanation:
"as at", "on" : are common accounting terms. "Balance sheets, profit and loss accounts, balances outstanding, sums due" are always stated in reference to a fixed date. Interest is "starting from" for example. The whole idea of a balance is to know just where you stand! In Claire's extract, "comptant" means sums due "as at/on" (including) the completion date.



Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 09:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
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1 hr
taking into account


Explanation:
I think it means including all right but for me the above sounds better

mckinnc
Local time: 09:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 922
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2 hrs
Further comments - partiularly for Paola!


Explanation:
http://ww6.investorrelations.co.uk/psion/hardcode/yr2000/acc...

Paola you are absolutely right to differentiate between "as of" and "as at" meaning "on".

Have a look at the balance sheet above. This is standard format for the presentation of company acounts in the UK. I'm just using it by way of an example to indicate terms used with monies due. The same term is often used when invoices and bills are presented : "amount due as at XX/XX/XX".

Youare absolutley right though about "as of".

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 09:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
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9 hrs
as of


Explanation:
I agree that there is a need for more context, but on the basis of what I have seen, normally this would mean "the balance as of the date of the signature...". "Comptant de" would not normally fit in this context, but again, I would need the full context to be sure.

Germaine A Hoston
Local time: 00:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 118
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