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licenciement pour raison économique

English translation: dismissal/redundancy for economic reasons

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:licenciement pour raison économique
English translation:dismissal/redundancy for economic reasons
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09:32 Aug 24, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
French term or phrase: licenciement pour raison économique
Is there a specific term in English for this, or is it just: dismissal for economic reasons?
Havona
Netherlands
Local time: 07:56
dismissal for economic reasons
Explanation:
Absolutely correct.

Ref.(via www.google.com):
The Fourth Study Commission, which was created at the Athens Congress in October 1994 and had its first meeting in Tunis in September 1995, received 23 reports from members coming from the following countries: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Luxembourg, Morocco, Norway, Republic of China (Taiwan), Romania, Senegal, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, Tunisia, United Kingdom.

The subject discussed was "Dismissal for economic reasons".

A questionnaire was previously distributed to the members of the Commission.

From the different reports it emerged that although dismissal for economic reasons is taken into account by the majority of national legislations, in certain countries this type of dismissal is part of the general regulations dealing with legal grounds for dismissal, while in a small number of countries this kind of dismissal is unknown.


HTH
Selected response from:

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 07:56
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
na +2redundancy
jgal
na +1redundancy for economic reasons
Mary Worby
na +1layoff (US) or redundancy(UK)
Theodore Quester
na -1dismissal for economic reasons
Evert DELOOF-SYS
na -1layoff for economic reasons
Germaine A Hoston


  

Answers


14 mins peer agreement (net): -1
dismissal for economic reasons


Explanation:
Absolutely correct.

Ref.(via www.google.com):
The Fourth Study Commission, which was created at the Athens Congress in October 1994 and had its first meeting in Tunis in September 1995, received 23 reports from members coming from the following countries: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Luxembourg, Morocco, Norway, Republic of China (Taiwan), Romania, Senegal, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, Tunisia, United Kingdom.

The subject discussed was "Dismissal for economic reasons".

A questionnaire was previously distributed to the members of the Commission.

From the different reports it emerged that although dismissal for economic reasons is taken into account by the majority of national legislations, in certain countries this type of dismissal is part of the general regulations dealing with legal grounds for dismissal, while in a small number of countries this kind of dismissal is unknown.


HTH


Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 07:56
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 287
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Theodore Quester: redundacy or layoff is more popular term
7 hrs
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21 mins peer agreement (net): +1
redundancy for economic reasons


Explanation:
I'd be tempted to go with 'redundancy' rather than 'dismissal' as it implies less fault on the part of the employee.

In a broader sense, you can talk about job cuts for economic reasons, laying off staff for economic reasons, depends on whether you could work those into your context ...

HTH

Mary


    experience
Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 484

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ashiq mangel
1 hr

agree  Lydia Smith
1 hr

disagree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Redundancy means being made unemployed for economic reasons. "Redundancy" alone does the trick. See Julia's answer.
5 hrs
  -> OK - just checked that and you're right, Nikki, sorry!
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44 mins peer agreement (net): +2
redundancy


Explanation:
in the UK, 'redundancy' on its own is used to mean dismissal for economic reasons, as opposed to 'dismissal' or 'sacking', which would imply some kind of fault or poor performance on the part of the person being laid off...

jgal
Local time: 07:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 897

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Thank you. Redundancy under UK law means very specifically for economic reasons so suffices
4 hrs

agree  Theodore Quester: and layoff is the same way in U.S.
6 hrs
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4 hrs peer agreement (net): -1
layoff for economic reasons


Explanation:
If this is for US English, "discharge" or layoff would fit better, because the term "redundancy" seems rarely used in the US for this.

The key thing is that this is to be contrasted with dismissal 'for cause', i.e., through fault of the employee, such as non-performance, absenteeism, etc.




    James, James, and Tirard, "Dictionnaire des ressources humaines"
Germaine A Hoston
Local time: 22:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 118

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Theodore Quester: layoff by itself does the trick, see below
2 hrs
  -> Not really, because often people in the US use the word "layoff" ambiguously, as a euphemism for being fired.
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7 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
layoff (US) or redundancy(UK)


Explanation:
drop the economic reasons, it is implied in:

layoff (in the U.S.) or

redundancy (UK)
(e.g., there were hundreds of layoffs,

for the U.S.

and, there were hundreds of redundancies,

for the U.K.




    Collins-Robert
Theodore Quester
United States
Local time: 01:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 35

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  dovo
7 hrs
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