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quart de brie

English translation: 90° segment

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:quart de brie
English translation:90° segment
Entered by: Gregory Flanders
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16:34 Feb 13, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Manufacturing
French term or phrase: quart de brie
"Déssynchronisation des pignons d'avance (quart de brie)"

"Re-synchroniser les pignons dans le quart de brie"

I can't seem to find anything that isn't about the cheese. ;)
Gregory Flanders
France
Local time: 10:47
90° segment
Explanation:
Q de B is a quarter of a circle. The Brie obviously being round. Brie is often used in engineering for a whole host of items. Just to confuse you a little, I have today carried out quality control on what are called "pancakes"! I leave you to imagine what they are.
Selected response from:

Bashiqa
France
Local time: 10:47
Grading comment
That's it! Thanks for the explanation.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
490° segmentBashiqa
1 +1pie-shapeEd Friesen
2(some kind of accessory ?)
Jean-Christophe Helary


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
(some kind of accessory ?)


Explanation:
I found that: http://www.panavision.fr/index.php?id_enfant=WFD3229512290ZM...

Jean-Christophe Helary
Japan
Local time: 17:47
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
pie-shape


Explanation:
A "pignon d'avance" could be a feed gear (like on a lathe, or a film projector), or possibly a pinion driving a rack.

It could be that your authors are talking about the correct position of a pinion that is geared to a gear that is not a whole wheel, but only a sector of it (hence pie-shaped, or cheese-slice-shaped if you're French). Presumably "syncronisation" is required because there is some way of disengaging the pinion from the pie-shaped gear (which is only free to turn over a limited angle, and therefore is a sort of rocker). Does tha tmake sense? A drawing would explain all of that much more elegantly.

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-02-13 17:41:50 GMT)
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Also, it just struck me that it could be that there is a rack with a pie-shaped pinion on it. Perhaps for linear positioning over an extremely limited range of movement? I'm not a mechanical engineer so I'm guessing.

Ed Friesen
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  askell: http://www.camera-forum.fr/lofiversion/index.php?t1882.html
1 hr
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1 day2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
90° segment


Explanation:
Q de B is a quarter of a circle. The Brie obviously being round. Brie is often used in engineering for a whole host of items. Just to confuse you a little, I have today carried out quality control on what are called "pancakes"! I leave you to imagine what they are.

Bashiqa
France
Local time: 10:47
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 7
Grading comment
That's it! Thanks for the explanation.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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