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auberge espagnole

English translation: melting pot of contemporary European cuisine

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:auberge espagnole
English translation:melting pot of contemporary European cuisine
Entered by: xxxpumpkin pie
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

15:05 Feb 19, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Marketing / Market Research / description of a restaurant
French term or phrase: auberge espagnole
Very famous restaurant in Paris run by an equally famous Head Chef.

L'ambition pour le déjeuner à XXX est ainsi de proposer un mix d'en-cas et de plats plus gastronomiques: "c'est l'auberge espagnole du XXIe siècle" aime à déclarer le jeune chef!

TIA
xxxpumpkin pie
Local time: 07:53
melting pot
Explanation:
He may be referring to the Franco-British film of the same name in which a group of international Erasmus students share a flat in Barcelona. In which case he means mixing different tastes, from different cultures.
Selected response from:

Emma Paulay
France
Local time: 07:53
Grading comment
Thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +5melting pot
Emma Paulay
5 +2a potluck
Priscilla Whitaker
4 +1smorgasbord
Priscilla Whitaker
4 +1fusion melting pot /pot luckkaty hannan
4 +1a European multicultural crossroads (for the 21st century)
Steven Capsuto
3a (modern) blend of cultures and gastronomic delights / cultures and cooking stylesPB Trans
3Euro-friendly fusion food / Erasmus programme
Andreas THEODOROU
4 -1Spanish innCarlos Segura


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Spanish inn


Explanation:
Regards.

Carlos Segura
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:53
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  juliebarba: it doesn't mean anything though......
42 mins
  -> I haven't seen the film, and it's hard to imagine that you have to bring your own food to the restaurant.

disagree  Priscilla Whitaker: word for word, and more linked to the film than the context
1 hr
  -> I haven't seen the film, and it's hard to imagine that you have to bring your own food to the restaurant.

agree  Sheila Wilson: I think he's saying he's re-inventing the tapas dishes traditionally served in Spain. I've never seen the film so I don't see that side to it.
3 hrs
  -> Many thanks.
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Euro-friendly fusion food / Erasmus programme


Explanation:
Presumably this is a reference to the film, which has "semi-cult" status in France but is virtually unknown in the UK. I can't think of a suitable cultural reference.

Furthermore, it's not clear what the chef is saying - fusion food or snacks from different countries??




Andreas THEODOROU
Spain
Local time: 07:53
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 7

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Alanna Wilson-Duff: not sure how much "Erasmus" means in English, especially to non-European English speakers...
22 mins
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
melting pot


Explanation:
He may be referring to the Franco-British film of the same name in which a group of international Erasmus students share a flat in Barcelona. In which case he means mixing different tastes, from different cultures.

Emma Paulay
France
Local time: 07:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 75
Grading comment
Thanks.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: Has to be a reference to the film since an "auberge espagnole" is originally a primitive one, with nothing but what you bring.
3 mins
  -> Thanks Bourth

agree  translator_15
12 mins
  -> Hi Emma, thanks!

agree  Alanna Wilson-Duff: I like this too, but feel that something should be added: maybe "melting pot of contemporary European cuisine" to capture the hip and funky aspect of the auberge espagnole
20 mins
  -> Yes indeed, thank you Alanna.

agree  Assimina Vavoula
54 mins
  -> Thanks Assimina

neutral  ormiston: they all sat round the table but was there much focus on food ? my only hesitation with 'melting pot' is that it sound as if it's all chucked into the same cauldron rather than what I presume it is - exotic tapas !
1 hr
  -> Hi ormiston, no there was no particular focus on food in the film. However, the term is currently used to describe a mixture of cultures. However, you're right - I think Alanna's addition above is necessary to make it sound appealing.

agree  PB Trans: I like Alanna's suggestion
3 hrs
  -> Thanks Pina
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
a European multicultural crossroads (for the 21st century)


Explanation:
I agree... It has to be a reference to that wonderful movie.

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Note added at 22 mins (2007-02-19 15:27:46 GMT)
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Wording it this way would preserve the original ambiguity as to whether the chef is referring to the cuisine, the clientele, or both.

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Note added at 23 mins (2007-02-19 15:28:43 GMT)
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Or perhaps a Pan-European crossroads?

Steven Capsuto
United States
Local time: 01:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alanna Wilson-Duff: I have to agree with this one- pot luck is too negative, as is 'mad house', although correct. I think what we're trying to get across here is the harmonious fusion of European culture and food. I think is also the most natural way of expressing this idea.
12 mins

neutral  juliebarba: a mix maybe, but the it's not stated that it's just European food.....
25 mins
  -> I suppose it depends how literally they're extending the metaphor from the film, which is about Erasmus students from across the E.U. sharing a flat in Barcelona. (Although eventually an American gets thrown into the mix.)
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
a potluck


Explanation:
"c'est l'auberge espagnole"
repas: everyone's bringing some food along | it's potluck (US)
situation chaotique: it's a madhouse *
Straight from Collins-Robert CD Rom, so I am quite sure

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Note added at 1 hr (2007-02-19 16:10:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Although I don't necessarily consider Wikipedia the ultimate source, it does seem to support the friendly idea, as well as its 16th century origins. When my French clients request "international" English, American English is used as the default, not British English - though that is a matter for personal consideration. Here's the Wikipedia entry:

A potluck, also called potluck dinner, or covered dish supper, is a gathering of people where each participant is expected to bring a dish of food to be shared among the group. These gatherings are often organized by churches, mosques, covens and other community groups since they simplify the meal planning and distribute the costs among the participants. Smaller, more informal get-togethers may also occur in the form of potlucks.

In Indiana, the term "potluck" is virtually unkown. The appropriate term used is a "pitch-in".

The only traditional rule for dishes is that they be large enough to be shared among a good portion (but not necessarily all) of the anticipated guests. In the United States, jello salads and casseroles are popular, often as Italian-style dishes.

Such events can also go by the name "Jacob's join", in which each participant brings along as much food as he or she is likely to want to eat, but puts it into a common stock for the communal meal.

Another variation on potlucks is "rota" meals, short for rotation. With rota, rather than each person bringing a dish, participants take turns providing food for the entire group. For regular potlucks (e.g. daily, weekly or monthly) amongst a fairly consistent set of participants, this dramatically reduces the amount of preparation effort required. One popular and long-standing implementation of this approach can be found at Sirius, an intentional community in rural Massachusetts.

The word potluck is sometimes erroneously thought to originate from the Native American custom of potlatch but, in fact, is of English origin.

The word potluck dates from the sixteenth century, and the earliest written citation is 1592 - in England. ("That that pure sanguine complexion of yours may never be famisht with pot lucke", Thomas Nashe, see the Oxford English Dictionary for full reference). It is a portmanteau word formed from pot and luck.

A secondary use of the term is to refer to whatever food happens to be available, especially when offered to a guest. Another use also mentioned in dictionaries is "that which is tendered or available in certain circumstances or at a certain time".
****
Must get back to work, friends! Good luck with potluck!


Priscilla Whitaker
France
Local time: 07:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Alanna Wilson-Duff: quite negative connotations though, I don't know that I'd want to eat anywhere that asked me to take potluck on their food!! ... I shall correct myself then Priscilla, this meaning of potluck not having reached British English!
16 mins
  -> it's not a question of taking potluck - in American culture it simply means an eating event where everyone brings something - it's is a positive, friendly, neighborhood kind of experience, not related to the "take your chances" term.

agree  Natasha Dupuy
16 mins

neutral  juliebarba: I agree with Alanna. I read your response to her and understand why you put it, but in UK English it means 'taking your chances' so it's not an expression that could be used internationally for marketing .......
25 mins

agree  katy hannan: But the actual meaning IS bringing along something and each one making their contribution...and that doesn't seem appropriate in a menu :-) However- since the chef is french... and the expression is a VERY common french expression, well before the film..
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
smorgasbord


Explanation:
How about a 21st-century smorgasbord? We've gone from Spanish inn to British English to American potluck, but maybe the Germans got it right!

Priscilla

Priscilla Whitaker
France
Local time: 07:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  PB Trans: Unless the client objects to the use of a Swedish reference, this is an equally idiomatic way of expressing the idea (a mix of snack-type dishes and more sophisticated ones). "It's a real smorgasborg!" could work. Note: the anglification is smorgasborG
1 hr
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
fusion melting pot /pot luck


Explanation:
I agree with these terms proposed: (couldnt fit my comment in below) would definitely go along these lines- also because the chef is french and explained that he was making a mix of gastronomic dishes- The term "Auberge spagnol" is VERY COMMON in French- well before the movie was made- so unless there is some direct reference or theme in the article I would not take it as read that it refers to the film. It simply means you get what is put on the table. (actually- it traditionally means that each one brings something along and makes a contribution) but it doesnt seem to go well with a restaurant menu- unless it refers to different dishes prepared by different chefs and served all together- In that case that is the true meaning.

katy hannan
Italy
Local time: 07:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ormiston: I think melting pot and pot luck aren't quite right. Fusion would mean a blend so perhaps the chef should be consulted;
45 mins
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
a (modern) blend of cultures and gastronomic delights / cultures and cooking styles


Explanation:
I don't think you can translate this literally. You may wish to add "modern" to refer to the part about the 21st century.

"L'auberge espagnole" literally translates as the Spanish inn, but it's also a French expression for a place where cultures are mixed together like a stew.
http://www.calendarlive.com/movies/reviews/cl-et-espagnole16...

TimesDispatch.com | No storm can wash away the flavor of New Orleans
Richmond, Va.- Monday, Jan. 29, 2007. Keyword Site. News. ... The gumbolike blend of cultures and cooking styles is also infused with local flavor since ...
www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD/MGArt....


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Note added at 3 hrs (2007-02-19 18:17:11 GMT)
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Another word for "blend" = "fusion"

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Note added at 3 hrs (2007-02-19 18:24:51 GMT)
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The mix, blend, fusion... refers to the types of dishes, from snack types to more sophisticated dishes. I wasn't referring to mixing together the different ingredients of the various dishes.


PB Trans
Local time: 06:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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