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09:59 Nov 13, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Marketing / Market Research
French term or phrase: prescription
The translation is a marketing plan for switch disconnectors. The company wants to increase its market share in industry as opposed to the residential sector. One way is to impose the use of their brand in certain types of installation. "L'animation et le succès de ces ventes impose une forte prescription auprès des utilisateurs finaux." "Seuls les ventes auprès de XXX sont satisfaisantes et en légère amélioration. L'explication est simple : XXX est dans une logique de prescription des produits qu'il distribue". "Son succès est lié à la qualité de son réseau commercial (bonnes prescriptions)". "Très forte prescription sur les marchés des énergies nouvelles (PV et éolien) avec une offre globale", et, "La formation produit en interne et chez nos clients est un véritable vecteur de prescription".
The resulting "prescripteur" corresponds to "specifier" in English, but I can't come up with a term for "prescription" that corresponds to these different elements. In previous posts, "specifications", "recommendations", "thought leader networks", "initiative leadership" and "referral networks" have been proposed for "prescription", but I don't see how I can them here. The only possibility I can find for the moment is the idea of "imposing our products" : "XXX imposes the products it distributes", ""product training ... helps us (?) to impose our products", "Successful sales drives are based on our ability to impose our products on end users", but I'm not entirely satisfied with these solutions.
Rosemary Kneipp
Local time: 00:20
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Summary of answers provided
4 +1Promotion/promoters etc and its derivatives where necessary
Andrew Mason
3recommend
Emma Paulay


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Promotion/promoters etc and its derivatives where necessary


Explanation:
I feel sure this is the meaning here

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Note added at 36 mins (2008-11-13 10:36:42 GMT)
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Roesemary, were ina marketing scenario here, where promotion is the name of the game. 'Specifying' does not really work, and is not a very good marketing term.

Andrew Mason
France
Local time: 00:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you for your answer, but I would like to include the idea that the company is a "specifier" in the sense that it gives technical reasons for using the product.

Asker: The idea really is to give the end user no choice but to use that product. This is an internal marketing plan and is not a question of promotion. I agree that "impose" is not satisfactory, but I need to convey an idea here of user guidance.

Asker: It might possibly include the idea but the aim of an in-house marketing plan is to give the sales reps specific guidelines and they would not know that "promotion" necessarily includes the idea of "prescription".


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Philippa: I agree that "promote" in all its forms would work best, and it can easily include the "specifying" idea. I'd keep well clear of "impose".
29 mins
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
recommend


Explanation:
Works in all your phrases I think. Imposing sounds rather too strong to me.

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Note added at 37 mins (2008-11-13 10:37:09 GMT)
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But imposing means leaving no alternative, no choice. You could say "strongly recommends" but not imposes.
When you buy a washing machine there's often a label with "Washpuddle recommends Avial".

Emma Paulay
France
Local time: 00:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 75
Notes to answerer
Asker: I don't consider that imposing is too strong, because the idea is to ensure that the customer will choose that product and not another. For example, a competitor uses design software to propose solutions that only use their product because of certain functionality. Promotion for me does not convey that meaning.

Asker: As I indicated to Andrew, it is a question of leaving no alternative. It doesn't correspond to "Washpuddle recommends Avial" but Avial getting Washpuddle to say "only 1 cm diameter green and red tablets should be used" when you know that the only corresponding brand is Avial. This may not be the way that "prescription" is used by everyone in the business, but it is definitely the idea that my client wants to convey. It includes the idea that the Avial reps are going to talk to the people at Washpuddle and explain why the green and red tablets are the best solution for Washpuddle machines because of their specific characteristics. I wonder whether "user guidance" might not be a possibility.

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