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taux tarifaire

English translation: tariff rate

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09:33 Feb 10, 2009
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Media / Multimedia
French term or phrase: taux tarifaire
From a media analysis application (allowing the user to calculate the rate paid by a sponsor for a specific ad placement time)

1.1.2.5 Gestion des taux tarifaire pour placement spécifique des spots
L'administrateur doit pouvoir définir le taux à appliquer aux tarifs si la campagne est optimisée avec un placement spécifique des spots:
• En première position dans le Break,
• En dernière position dans le Break,
• En première et/ou dernière position dans le Break
Ysabel812
English translation:tariff rate
Explanation:
you just want a term to describe the variable rates at which a tariff (cost) is levied, I think.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day8 hrs (2009-02-11 18:24:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tariff states that a tariff is either a price, or a price rate. Thus when I combine ‘tariff” and “rate” I think it adequately points to the idea of a rate applied to a tariff. It is not explicit, but that’s okay because the point of the second sentence is to make this explicit…which is why ‘mark up rate’ is good in that context.

I agree mark up rate is the right term for the adjustment factor to be applied to the basic rate.
To me it seems perfect translation for ‘taux a appliquer’…see below:

Lets try both options for the heading:

1. Management of ** mark-up rates** for selected placement of spots.
2. Management of ***tariff rates*** for selected placement of spots.

1. The first assumes too much, I think. But only context can tell whether the first ‘taux tarifaire’ means the basic rate adjusted by the mark-up rate, or the adjustment factor (i.e. mark up rate) alone.

2. I assumed it was talking about the final, single definite rate applied to the spot (basic rate plus mark up). And that this is what is meant by ‘taux tarifaire’. So in that case, ‘tariff rate’ could work.
Also since ‘taux a appliquer’ is not the heading title, I think a simple ‘tariff rate’ captures what is meant here.

...
Selected response from:

S.J.
France
Local time: 22:53
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3tariff rate
S.J.
4mark-up rate
Robin Levey
4tariff scales
kashew
4rate
RemyUK


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
rate


Explanation:
I think "rate" is enough.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 minutes (2009-02-10 09:51:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

well, "rates" in this context

RemyUK
Spain
Local time: 21:53
Native speaker of: French

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Robin Levey: No, 'rate' is certainly not enough here (pse see my answer for explanation).
1 hr
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
tariff scales


Explanation:
* another option

kashew
France
Local time: 22:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
mark-up rate


Explanation:
In this specific context, where the text says "le taux à appliquer aux tarifs", it it referring to the mark-up rate, i.e. an extra charge added to the basic tarrif when the client wants extra exposure at the start of the ad break, etc.

Note that at the start of the source text extract (Gestion des taux tarifaire ...), 'taux' is singular, but in 'le taux à appliquer aux tarifs' it is singular. There will usually be a different mark-up rate (%) for each of the privileged placements mentioned.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2009-02-10 11:14:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is important to retain the idea, embedded in the French text, that there are two scales involved here: one concerns the time of day (or day of the week) at which the ad break is broadcast; the second one concerns the position of an individual ad within its break.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2009-02-10 11:18:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oops: "(Gestion des taux tarifaire ...), 'taux' is singular"
should read
"(Gestion des taux tarifaire ...), 'taux' is plural"

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 17:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 58

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  S.J.: I see your point; your suggestion might be more explicit in that way. By that logic, you would also have to use 'mark up rate' for 'taux a appliquer' , yes?
1 day6 hrs
  -> Yes, by my logic (and experience in this field) 'taux à appliquer' would be 'mark-up rate to be applied'.
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
tariff rate


Explanation:
you just want a term to describe the variable rates at which a tariff (cost) is levied, I think.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day8 hrs (2009-02-11 18:24:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tariff states that a tariff is either a price, or a price rate. Thus when I combine ‘tariff” and “rate” I think it adequately points to the idea of a rate applied to a tariff. It is not explicit, but that’s okay because the point of the second sentence is to make this explicit…which is why ‘mark up rate’ is good in that context.

I agree mark up rate is the right term for the adjustment factor to be applied to the basic rate.
To me it seems perfect translation for ‘taux a appliquer’…see below:

Lets try both options for the heading:

1. Management of ** mark-up rates** for selected placement of spots.
2. Management of ***tariff rates*** for selected placement of spots.

1. The first assumes too much, I think. But only context can tell whether the first ‘taux tarifaire’ means the basic rate adjusted by the mark-up rate, or the adjustment factor (i.e. mark up rate) alone.

2. I assumed it was talking about the final, single definite rate applied to the spot (basic rate plus mark up). And that this is what is meant by ‘taux tarifaire’. So in that case, ‘tariff rate’ could work.
Also since ‘taux a appliquer’ is not the heading title, I think a simple ‘tariff rate’ captures what is meant here.

...



    Reference: http://www.intracen.org/tfs/docs/glossary/tf.htm
S.J.
France
Local time: 22:53
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  kashew
4 mins

neutral  Robin Levey: No, this does not correctly convey the duality of the tariff system.
1 hr
  -> Actually, I think it does...a tariff is one price, a rate is another. Hence I did not put simply 'tariff' or 'rate'. the phrase does not contain the definition, its true, but it means that in most contexts.

agree  Michel F. Morin
7 hrs

agree  atche84
7 hrs
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