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Dulce es decorum est pro patria mori.

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19:45 Aug 29, 2000
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Medical
French term or phrase: Dulce es decorum est pro patria mori.
i need to know for a parper I am writting.
clay
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Summary of answers provided
4Wilfred Owen's most famous poem
Lucy-Jane Michel
naSweet and honorable (noble) it is, to die for one's countryLouise Atfield
naAs my colleagues have noted, the meaning of this Latin motto is...Heathcliff
naIt is proper and good to die for one's country. See below.Toña Morales-Calkins
naIt is right and proper to die for one's country
Yolanda Broad


  

Answers


11 mins
It is right and proper to die for one's country


Explanation:
This is Latin. It doesn't usually get translated. Folks who are willing to lay down their lives for their country are, of course, well-versed in the classics (wink, wink).

Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 08:41
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1551
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1 hr
It is proper and good to die for one's country. See below.


Explanation:
This phrase is Latin, not French, and is generally not translated. The more commonly used English phrase for the same meaning is that one "makes the ultimate sacrifice for his/her country."

Toña Morales-Calkins
United States
Local time: 05:41
PRO pts in pair: 6
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2 hrs
As my colleagues have noted, the meaning of this Latin motto is...


Explanation:
..."It is sweet and honorable to die for one's country." The phrase originally appeared in the Odes of Horace (III, ii, 13), and the proper Latin spelling is "Dulce et decorum est..." (that is, "et" ("and"), not "es").

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 05:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 953

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Louise Atfield
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9 hrs
Sweet and honorable (noble) it is, to die for one's country


Explanation:
Heathcliff's version seems to me the most accurate so far. Dulce (dulcis, e adjective) means "sweet" or "pleasant". In French, you would say "doux". Decorum (decorus, a, um, adjective) means "beautiful" or "noble" or "honorable" or "proper".

"Patria" doesn't quite mean the same thing as "country", although it is usually translated with that word. Patria comes from the word "pater" (father), and literally means "fatherland". "Native land" would be a better translation than country if you wanted to preserve the original meaning. But "country" will do...

Of course, as others have already pointed out, the sentence is latin and is a known classic, so it usually stands on its own, in the original, with maybe the translation in parenthesis if deemed necessary.

Louise Atfield
PRO pts in pair: 300
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2725 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Wilfred Owen's most famous poem


Explanation:
Can't resist - Wilfred Owen uses this in his poem 'Dulce et Decorum Est'...the irony is heartbreaking and always brings tears to my eyes.


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Note added at 2725 jours (2008-02-15 10:40:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

DULCE ET DECORUM EST

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind.

Gas! Gas! Quick, boys! – An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling,
And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime . . .
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.
In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
Pro patria mori.



Lucy-Jane Michel
France
Local time: 14:41
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 52
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