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Official letter of certification / certifying a technical translation

English translation: It's not terribly complicated --

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05:35 Oct 5, 2000
French to English translations [PRO]
Medical
French term or phrase: Official letter of certification / certifying a technical translation
I would be grateful if anyone could help me by explaining to me what exactly is involved when one must send a "letter of certification" (ultimately for the FDA) for a technical translation from French into English for a pharmaceutical company here in Ireland.
The certification procedure is one that is not yet in place here in this country.
I guess it involves a stamp by a notary public... But I am not sure what else, or how exactly it must be done.. Any info on the subject would be most welcome !!
Wivine de BECO
Local time: 17:27
English translation:It's not terribly complicated --
Explanation:
I do a lot of pharmaceutical work that eventually gets to the FDA, and over the years have developed a two-paragraph statement that starts "I, the undersigned, hereby certify..." and mentions my status as a professional translator, my ATA accreditation(s), the address of my offices, and my familiarity with the source and target languages.

The next 'graf describes the particular document(s) that I've translated (not in excessive detail -- just enough to identify the docs), and ends with a confirmation, under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing remarks are true and correct.

The statement ends with the place and date, and my signature and ATA membership number. If the client has requested it, I have the statement notarized. That's all there is to it. To date (after more than a decade at it) I've never had a certification statement challenged...

Hope this helps! -- HC
Selected response from:

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 09:27
Grading comment
Many thanks. Your comments were really useful. I have been able to devise a letter which I can use every time.. I am very grateful.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naAn educated guess:
Evert DELOOF-SYS
naIt's not terribly complicated --Heathcliff


  

Answers


11 mins
It's not terribly complicated --


Explanation:
I do a lot of pharmaceutical work that eventually gets to the FDA, and over the years have developed a two-paragraph statement that starts "I, the undersigned, hereby certify..." and mentions my status as a professional translator, my ATA accreditation(s), the address of my offices, and my familiarity with the source and target languages.

The next 'graf describes the particular document(s) that I've translated (not in excessive detail -- just enough to identify the docs), and ends with a confirmation, under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing remarks are true and correct.

The statement ends with the place and date, and my signature and ATA membership number. If the client has requested it, I have the statement notarized. That's all there is to it. To date (after more than a decade at it) I've never had a certification statement challenged...

Hope this helps! -- HC

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 09:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 953
Grading comment
Many thanks. Your comments were really useful. I have been able to devise a letter which I can use every time.. I am very grateful.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad

Glen McCulley
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22 mins
An educated guess:


Explanation:
As I suppose the pharmaceutical company already has all English certificates needed for their products to be accepted by the FDA in Ireland, all you have to do is to take your French translation to a court magistrate (at the Court where you're 'certified' as a translator)and have the document legalized.
Underneath the translation (and I'm sure you know all this) you should write something like: 'The undersigned,... (name + address), certified translator at the Court of..., hereby certifies that the above is a verbatim translation into French of the original document made out in the English language. (Date, place etc + signature)'.
This will then be legalized at the registrar's or clerk's office of the court and duly signed by a court magistrate.
If you're not a certified translator, then I suggest you look for somebody who is.
This is by far the easiest method.

A notary public can only legalize your signature, but unless you prove you're an official translator, he/she will not be able to judge the contents of your translation.
A certified translator at a court doesn't have to prove anything anymore, as he/she has to prove he/she masters certain languages before he/she can become an accredited/sworn translator.

If there's an official translation association in Ireland (eg the Irish version of ATA) and you're an accredited member (which I assume is not the case), then, of course, you'd know what you have to do.

And if I got your question wrong, please forgive me:-)
HTH

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 18:27
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 287

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad
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