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fruits et des légumes

English translation: fruits and vegetables

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14:51 Aug 11, 2002
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Medical
French term or phrase: fruits et des légumes
In American English,

Fruits and Legumes? or
Fruits and Pulses?

I've never heard the word Pulses in the U.S. Which one is the correct translation? This was translated by an English translator. Perhaps in England the word pulse is used but is it also in the US?
Maria
English translation:fruits and vegetables
Explanation:
pulses are dry items, such as chick peas, lentils etc
Selected response from:

Peter Bagney
Spain
Local time: 08:44
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +17fruits and vegetablesPeter Bagney
4 +3fruit and vegetablesDPolice
5Fruit(s) and Vegetables depending on context...xxxkmreder


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +17
fruits and vegetables


Explanation:
pulses are dry items, such as chick peas, lentils etc

Peter Bagney
Spain
Local time: 08:44
PRO pts in pair: 219
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Thierry LOTTE
3 mins
  -> Thx Thierry

agree  spencer
9 mins
  -> Thx Spencer

agree  Therese Nichols: Pulse is a "legume sec" for your information. This word is utilized in the U.S. and is very adequate in a recipe book!!!
9 mins
  -> quite right! Thx Therese

agree  Florence B
13 mins
  -> Thx Oddie

agree  Jennifer White: but we would say "fruit and vegetables"
50 mins
  -> Jennifer: fruits & veg outpolls fruit and veg by a margin of 5 to 2...

agree  Trudy Peters
2 hrs
  -> Thx Trudy

agree  Diane Fontainebleau Pochй: To be safe, you may want to check the ST to make sure it does include all veggies, and not just the dried beans.
3 hrs

agree  jerrie
4 hrs

agree  Deborah James
4 hrs

agree  Yolanda Broad
5 hrs

agree  Karina Pelech
7 hrs

agree  Sue Crocker
8 hrs

agree  xxxPaulaMac: Also depends on context - in a supermarket "produce" covers fruit and veg.
12 hrs

agree  xxxswani
16 hrs

agree  Linda Jarosiewicz
21 hrs

agree  evelyn evans: Does not the English term 'legumes' translate into French as légumineuses? (See Petit Robert:Famille de plantes...dont le fruit est une gousse.'
1 day8 mins

neutral  gad: does this still translate as "fruits and vegetables" in a medical context?
1 day3 hrs

agree  Ben Gaia
1 day6 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
fruit and vegetables


Explanation:
see below


    Reference: http://www.ams.usda.gov/fv/mncs/
DPolice
Local time: 08:44
PRO pts in pair: 454

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Helen Genevier
17 mins

agree  MafaldaDec
21 mins

agree  Sarah Ponting: yes, fruit not fruits
17 hrs

neutral  gad: does this still translate as "fruit(s) and vegetables" in a medical context?
1 day1 hr
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2 days7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Fruit(s) and Vegetables depending on context...


Explanation:
If you see a sign on the side of the road in France that states, "Fruits et Legumes" you can be sure to find a variety of fruits and vegetables at a roadside stand. "Legume" in English and French are false friends. They may look like they mean the same thing, but they do not. In English, it's anything in the group of foods containing bean and peas. In French, it's just vegetables. So, neither 'pulses' nor 'legumes' is correct. One translator says it should be fruitS while another wants to leave out the 's' and make it fruit. Either could be correct. True, if we're talking about peaches, for example, it's just a lot of fruit (no 's'), no matter whether there are 50 or just one. If we are talking about a number of different varieties of fruit, however, we can use the 's'. Such as a doctor telling a patient to eat a variety of fruits and vegetables in order to have good health. "Fruit" is what we call a "mass count noun" and generally does not need an 's' to be pluralized (like fish, cheese, etc.), but it can be pluralized with an 's' in contexts where many varieties of the noun are being talked about ("the fishes of the sea", for example)

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Note added at 2002-08-14 09:25:37 (GMT)
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Check your context. If the word \"secs\" appears after \"legumes,\" then your original translator did just fine. \"Legumes secs\" translates as \"Legumes\" in English, or \"Pulses\".

xxxkmreder
France
Local time: 08:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 10
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