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bouffées de trinitrine

English translation: puff (dose) of nitroglycerin

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:bouffée de trinitrine
English translation:puff (dose) of nitroglycerin
Entered by: Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Options:
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09:54 Jan 21, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Medical
French term or phrase: bouffées de trinitrine
In a medical report. "Bouffées" seems commonly translated as "flushes" or "flushing". I'm just not certain what's best in this context or exactly how trinitrine is administered...2 flushes/doses/puffs??? Help gratefully appreciated.
Sarah Walls
Australia
Local time: 17:52
inhalations of nitroglycerine
Explanation:
I lay claim to absolutely no speciality whatsoever in this domain. Never the less, here is what I have found, which from my general reading and knowledge sounds highly likely.

Confidence rating is low, not because I'm guessing - I wouldn't dare answer if that were the case, but because I have no specialist knowledge of the field to knwo whether my findings are right.

http://www.granddictionnaire.com/_fs_global_01.htm

médecine
pharmacologie

anglais : nitroglycerin Syn.nitroglycerine, trinitrine, glyceryl trinitrate

français : nitroglycérine n. f. Syn. trinitrine n. f., trinitrate de glycéryle

Déf. :
Médicament qui procure une vaso-dilation des artères coronaires et qui est utilisé dans le traitement de l'angine de poitrine. (R)

Note(s) :
La nitroglycérine peut être administrée sous forme de comprimé, d'injection, d'onguent, de vaporisateur sublingual ou de timbre transdermique. (R)
Elle est commercialisée sous les marques déposées suivantes : Nitro-Dur, Nitrol, Nitroglycérine, Nitrong, Nitrolingual, Transderm-Nitro et Tridil. ®


1 - www.cdc.gov/niosh/idlh/55630.html

Acute nitroglycerine poisoning. Can Med Assoc J 50:199202. 6. Stein W [1956]. Mechanism of action of chronic inhalation of nitroglycol.

2 - www.rsu.edu/faculty/cohman/images/ general%20pharmacology.ppt

Trade names: Nitrostat. Official name: nitroglycerine tablets, USP. 11/5/02. Routes
of Administration. Sublingual. Oral. Inhalation. Injection. 11/5/02.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-21 10:11:59 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

3 - http://www.manbit.com/PAC/chapters/P35.cfm

Vasoactive drugs:
The American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Privileges in Cardiology 1 has recommended that users of pulmonary artery catheters have a \"Knowledge of the pharmacologic effects of the drugs that alter preload, afterload, and inotropic state.\" Accordingly, thumbnail sketches of some of the relevant vasoactive drugs are given below.
Vasodilators.
Vasodilator drugs are now available which can specifically \'target\' different sites in the circulation (Figure 1). Some drugs, such as hydralazine, exert their primary effects on the arterial capacitance vessels - reducing both afterload and blood pressure. In contrast, nitroglycerine (glyceryl trinitrate) acts predominantly as a venodilator and reduces preload while having little effect on afterload. Sodium nitroprusside is a potent, \'mixed\', vasodilator which reliably reduces both afterload and preload. Drugs such as nitric oxide and adenosine, which have extremely short half-lives, can effectively be used to target the pulmonary circulation.
[…]
Nitroglycerine.
As a vasodilator, nitroglycerine acts predominantly on the venous side of the circulation to reduce preload. The reduction in preload is accompanied by a decrease in LV wall tension with a secondary reduction in myocardial oxygen utitilisation (Figure 4). Nitroglycerine is also a specific coronary arterial vasodilator and spasmolytic. Thus it acts beneficially on both the supply and demand sides of the myocardial oxygenation equation. In addition to increasing venous capacitance, the drug reduces PVR and tends to increase venous admixture (Figure 5). At higher dosages, nitroglycerine also reduces afterload and blood pressure and, as a result, tends to cause a reflex tachycardia.
The drug has other unwanted effects apart from the potential to cause hypoxia and tachycardia. - Tolerance to the drug may develop after a relatively short period of exposure 10, it may interfere with the anticoagulant effect of heparin 11 and may also depress platelet aggregation 12.
The use of intravenous nitroglycerine was not described until 1976 13 over a 100 years after the first reports of the use of the organic nitrates in the treatment of angina pectoris 14, 15. The drugs are still of primary importance in the treatment of acute myocardial ischaemia. Intravenous nitroglycerine is given by constant infusion in the dose range 0.5 - 5 mcg/kg/min.
It should be noted that a considerable amount of nitroglycerine may be absorbed onto the surface of a PAC if this route is chosen for the administration of the drug 19. If the same administration channel is subsequently used for the delivery of another infusion, clinically significant amounts of nitroglycerine may be eluted into the new infusion for a period of 30-60 minutes.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-22 07:23:45 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, I agree that the spray form does indeed appear to be the most common form of administration, rather than inhalation. \"Bouffée\" in that case is probably best translated as


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-22 07:29:43 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

\"dose\", although do bear in mind that a dose may mean two short sprays, one long one, three little ones... not necessarily one, if you see what I mean. One of the examples states not to inhale the spray (oops for my suggestion!) and another does in fact refer to puffs of spray.

Example :

http://www.rxmed.com/b.main/b2.pharmaceutical/b2.1.monograph...

Dosage And Administration: Do not shake canister. Not for inhalation.

Upon initiating therapy with Nitrolingual Spray, especially when changing from another form of nitroglycerin administration, patients should be followed closely by their physicians in order to determine the minimal effective dose for each patient.

With the onset of an acute attack of angina pectoris, 1 or 2 metered doses (0.4 or 0.8 mg) of nitroglycerin, as determined by experience, may be administered onto or under the tongue, without inhaling. The optimal dose may be repeated twice at 5 to 10 minute intervals. Dosage must be individualized and should be sufficient to provide relief without producing untoward reactions.


http://www.everybody.co.nz/docsa_c/angina.html

Nitrolingual spray

Nitrolingual spray delivers a measured dose of nitrate into your mouth. The droplets are absorbed quickly, giving an immediate effect. To use it effectively you should be sitting or lying down. Do not shake the canister, hold it upright and spray one or two puffs on or under your tongue, then close your mouth. Rest for a few minutes and resume activity gently. Repeat up to three times as necessary. If angina persists, call an ambulance. If you have not used your spray recently, be sure it still sprays.
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 07:52
Grading comment
It would have been nice to be able to share points on this one, as Nikki's answer and references suggests "trinitrine" is probably best translated as "nitroglycerin", but from the other answers it's clear the drug is usually given as spray, not an inhalation. Thanks to everyone for suggestions.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2nitroglycerine spray
jkjones
4 +2trinitrine puff
Francis MARC
5nitroglycerin dose
Louise Dupont
5a puff of nitroglycerin
Anne Pietrasik
3trinitrine surges
Arthur Borges
2inhalations of nitroglycerine
Nikki Scott-Despaigne


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
trinitrine surges


Explanation:
Am unsure of "trinitrine" but there's a 50%+ chance it's right.

Arthur Borges
China
Local time: 14:52
PRO pts in pair: 404
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
trinitrine puff


Explanation:
[PDF]Comparaison de l'efficacité de deux traitements thrombolytiques ...
Format de fichier: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Version HTML
... divers cycles. Une seconde acquisition était réalisée après administration d'un "puff" sublingual de trinitrine. Le traitement ...
www.hbroussais.fr/Broussais/InforMed/ InforSante/Volume2/pdf2/2-10.pdf

Francis MARC
Lithuania
Local time: 08:52
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 6500

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  cjohnstone
1 min

agree  Pascale Dahan: puff or spray
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
inhalations of nitroglycerine


Explanation:
I lay claim to absolutely no speciality whatsoever in this domain. Never the less, here is what I have found, which from my general reading and knowledge sounds highly likely.

Confidence rating is low, not because I'm guessing - I wouldn't dare answer if that were the case, but because I have no specialist knowledge of the field to knwo whether my findings are right.

http://www.granddictionnaire.com/_fs_global_01.htm

médecine
pharmacologie

anglais : nitroglycerin Syn.nitroglycerine, trinitrine, glyceryl trinitrate

français : nitroglycérine n. f. Syn. trinitrine n. f., trinitrate de glycéryle

Déf. :
Médicament qui procure une vaso-dilation des artères coronaires et qui est utilisé dans le traitement de l'angine de poitrine. (R)

Note(s) :
La nitroglycérine peut être administrée sous forme de comprimé, d'injection, d'onguent, de vaporisateur sublingual ou de timbre transdermique. (R)
Elle est commercialisée sous les marques déposées suivantes : Nitro-Dur, Nitrol, Nitroglycérine, Nitrong, Nitrolingual, Transderm-Nitro et Tridil. ®


1 - www.cdc.gov/niosh/idlh/55630.html

Acute nitroglycerine poisoning. Can Med Assoc J 50:199202. 6. Stein W [1956]. Mechanism of action of chronic inhalation of nitroglycol.

2 - www.rsu.edu/faculty/cohman/images/ general%20pharmacology.ppt

Trade names: Nitrostat. Official name: nitroglycerine tablets, USP. 11/5/02. Routes
of Administration. Sublingual. Oral. Inhalation. Injection. 11/5/02.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-21 10:11:59 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

3 - http://www.manbit.com/PAC/chapters/P35.cfm

Vasoactive drugs:
The American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Privileges in Cardiology 1 has recommended that users of pulmonary artery catheters have a \"Knowledge of the pharmacologic effects of the drugs that alter preload, afterload, and inotropic state.\" Accordingly, thumbnail sketches of some of the relevant vasoactive drugs are given below.
Vasodilators.
Vasodilator drugs are now available which can specifically \'target\' different sites in the circulation (Figure 1). Some drugs, such as hydralazine, exert their primary effects on the arterial capacitance vessels - reducing both afterload and blood pressure. In contrast, nitroglycerine (glyceryl trinitrate) acts predominantly as a venodilator and reduces preload while having little effect on afterload. Sodium nitroprusside is a potent, \'mixed\', vasodilator which reliably reduces both afterload and preload. Drugs such as nitric oxide and adenosine, which have extremely short half-lives, can effectively be used to target the pulmonary circulation.
[…]
Nitroglycerine.
As a vasodilator, nitroglycerine acts predominantly on the venous side of the circulation to reduce preload. The reduction in preload is accompanied by a decrease in LV wall tension with a secondary reduction in myocardial oxygen utitilisation (Figure 4). Nitroglycerine is also a specific coronary arterial vasodilator and spasmolytic. Thus it acts beneficially on both the supply and demand sides of the myocardial oxygenation equation. In addition to increasing venous capacitance, the drug reduces PVR and tends to increase venous admixture (Figure 5). At higher dosages, nitroglycerine also reduces afterload and blood pressure and, as a result, tends to cause a reflex tachycardia.
The drug has other unwanted effects apart from the potential to cause hypoxia and tachycardia. - Tolerance to the drug may develop after a relatively short period of exposure 10, it may interfere with the anticoagulant effect of heparin 11 and may also depress platelet aggregation 12.
The use of intravenous nitroglycerine was not described until 1976 13 over a 100 years after the first reports of the use of the organic nitrates in the treatment of angina pectoris 14, 15. The drugs are still of primary importance in the treatment of acute myocardial ischaemia. Intravenous nitroglycerine is given by constant infusion in the dose range 0.5 - 5 mcg/kg/min.
It should be noted that a considerable amount of nitroglycerine may be absorbed onto the surface of a PAC if this route is chosen for the administration of the drug 19. If the same administration channel is subsequently used for the delivery of another infusion, clinically significant amounts of nitroglycerine may be eluted into the new infusion for a period of 30-60 minutes.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-22 07:23:45 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, I agree that the spray form does indeed appear to be the most common form of administration, rather than inhalation. \"Bouffée\" in that case is probably best translated as


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-22 07:29:43 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

\"dose\", although do bear in mind that a dose may mean two short sprays, one long one, three little ones... not necessarily one, if you see what I mean. One of the examples states not to inhale the spray (oops for my suggestion!) and another does in fact refer to puffs of spray.

Example :

http://www.rxmed.com/b.main/b2.pharmaceutical/b2.1.monograph...

Dosage And Administration: Do not shake canister. Not for inhalation.

Upon initiating therapy with Nitrolingual Spray, especially when changing from another form of nitroglycerin administration, patients should be followed closely by their physicians in order to determine the minimal effective dose for each patient.

With the onset of an acute attack of angina pectoris, 1 or 2 metered doses (0.4 or 0.8 mg) of nitroglycerin, as determined by experience, may be administered onto or under the tongue, without inhaling. The optimal dose may be repeated twice at 5 to 10 minute intervals. Dosage must be individualized and should be sufficient to provide relief without producing untoward reactions.


http://www.everybody.co.nz/docsa_c/angina.html

Nitrolingual spray

Nitrolingual spray delivers a measured dose of nitrate into your mouth. The droplets are absorbed quickly, giving an immediate effect. To use it effectively you should be sitting or lying down. Do not shake the canister, hold it upright and spray one or two puffs on or under your tongue, then close your mouth. Rest for a few minutes and resume activity gently. Repeat up to three times as necessary. If angina persists, call an ambulance. If you have not used your spray recently, be sure it still sprays.



    Reference: http://www.granddictionnaire.com
    www.rsu.edu/faculty/cohman/images/ general%20pharmacology.ppt
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 07:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4459
Grading comment
It would have been nice to be able to share points on this one, as Nikki's answer and references suggests "trinitrine" is probably best translated as "nitroglycerin", but from the other answers it's clear the drug is usually given as spray, not an inhalation. Thanks to everyone for suggestions.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
nitroglycerine spray


Explanation:
sprayed under tongue - many patients with heart disease carry it

jkjones
Local time: 06:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 21

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Pascale Dahan: spray since it is vaporised
20 mins

agree  Deborah James
9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
nitroglycerin dose


Explanation:
Cardiac husband.....
It is not inhalation because you don't inhale it. It's a sublingual spray you keep under your tongue for a while,

Louise Dupont
Canada
Local time: 01:52
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in pair: 179
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days 12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
a puff of nitroglycerin


Explanation:
The French word "bouffée" is a precise dosage indication. It is true that it is a sublingual administration route but the French text does not say "une bouffée sublinguale de trinitrine" and anyhow, everyone in the medical world knows that a nitroglycerin puff is systematically sublingual.
It is certainly not an inhalation

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-23 22:35:14 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

As for the translation of \"bouffées\" by \"flushes\" or \"flushing\", this is a different sense of the word, generaly used to indicate hot flushes in menopausal women. The French will then often say \"bouffées vasomotrices\" or \"bouffées de chaleur\" in this case.

Anne Pietrasik
France
Local time: 07:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 79
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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