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Mesure du profil/prox/mil/dis

English translation: A suggestion

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14:21 Oct 11, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
Medical
French term or phrase: Mesure du profil/prox/mil/dis
Tableau de résultats du contrôle fonctionnel des stents à sertir

Mesure du profil
prox
mil
dis
Carol Lagler-Kolusheva
Local time: 09:52
English translation:A suggestion
Explanation:
You must be dealing with internal abbreviations--not something "standard." What a pain! The obvious thing to do is to ask whoever hired you to find out what the heck those abbreviations stand for. People who hire translators are generally more than glad to make sure that you have the necessary info. But I know it isn't always possible to get hold of someone who can track down the info...

I recently had a translation that involved abbreviations that were clearly internal to the organization. I didn't have access to the company the document was from, and I knew that the agency that sent me the job had all gone home, and, moreover, were going to be on holiday until the day the translation was due. What to do?

Luckily, the document was from the Mexican branch of a very big company and my brother in law had just retired from the US part of the company. I contacted him, and got the terminology that would fit in each of the slots. So... several suggestions, since I don't expect you have a brother-in-law floating around out there who just happens to have been involved in that same company:

Figure out exactly what kind of business this is, and go looking on the Internet for some other company in the same business, and find some document where functional checking or operational checking is taking place, and see what they've got **spelled out** for the same context; they're not likely to be using the same abbreviations, and maybe you can put two and two together.

The other approach is to take as much of the immediate context as you've gotten translated, and do an internet search with key words **in English** from that context. Then go take a look at the document and see if you can turn up anything already in English that would fit those abbreviations.

And, by the way, I do find some sites in English that include some of the terms together. For instance:

MD&M East 2000 - Product Preview - Contract Manufacturing
... feature a dual functioning check valve, male and ... offers machining of stents, laser welding of ... balloon cuffs are functioning properly during use ... 1,100 volts/mil). ...
www.devicelink.com/expo/east00/contractman.html

Also, the site, below, is a SURGICAL PATHOLOGY DATABASE: RAW WORDS. It has all the terms you have listed, above. I'm also giving you the URL for Google, just in case (although I expect you're alreayd amply familiar with the latter).
Selected response from:

Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 04:52
Grading comment
Thank you very much for all the trouble you took and the web-links.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1proximal middle distal (segments)xxxAbu Amaal
1 +1A suggestion
Yolanda Broad


  

Answers


5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
A suggestion


Explanation:
You must be dealing with internal abbreviations--not something "standard." What a pain! The obvious thing to do is to ask whoever hired you to find out what the heck those abbreviations stand for. People who hire translators are generally more than glad to make sure that you have the necessary info. But I know it isn't always possible to get hold of someone who can track down the info...

I recently had a translation that involved abbreviations that were clearly internal to the organization. I didn't have access to the company the document was from, and I knew that the agency that sent me the job had all gone home, and, moreover, were going to be on holiday until the day the translation was due. What to do?

Luckily, the document was from the Mexican branch of a very big company and my brother in law had just retired from the US part of the company. I contacted him, and got the terminology that would fit in each of the slots. So... several suggestions, since I don't expect you have a brother-in-law floating around out there who just happens to have been involved in that same company:

Figure out exactly what kind of business this is, and go looking on the Internet for some other company in the same business, and find some document where functional checking or operational checking is taking place, and see what they've got **spelled out** for the same context; they're not likely to be using the same abbreviations, and maybe you can put two and two together.

The other approach is to take as much of the immediate context as you've gotten translated, and do an internet search with key words **in English** from that context. Then go take a look at the document and see if you can turn up anything already in English that would fit those abbreviations.

And, by the way, I do find some sites in English that include some of the terms together. For instance:

MD&M East 2000 - Product Preview - Contract Manufacturing
... feature a dual functioning check valve, male and ... offers machining of stents, laser welding of ... balloon cuffs are functioning properly during use ... 1,100 volts/mil). ...
www.devicelink.com/expo/east00/contractman.html

Also, the site, below, is a SURGICAL PATHOLOGY DATABASE: RAW WORDS. It has all the terms you have listed, above. I'm also giving you the URL for Google, just in case (although I expect you're alreayd amply familiar with the latter).


    Reference: http://www.autopsydb.org/iadbsrwl.htm
    Reference: http://www.google.com
Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 04:52
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1551
Grading comment
Thank you very much for all the trouble you took and the web-links.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Practical advice is always welcome!
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
proximal middle distal (segments)


Explanation:
natural abbreviations ...

xxxAbu Amaal
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 51

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sktrans
2 days 23 hrs
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