Asthmatique et diabétique de type relou

English translation: asthmatic and "heavy" type diabetic

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Asthmatique et diabétique de type relou
English translation:asthmatic and "heavy" type diabetic
Entered by: Charles Davis

14:05 Aug 5, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / Diabetes
French term or phrase: Asthmatique et diabétique de type relou
I am revising the translation of a presentation relating to a device used by diabetics, and the online posts of a group of patients. This phrase is part of a patient post about herself. I know that 'relou' can mean 'stupid', I would welcome suggestions for what it might mean here.
Sue Davis
France
Local time: 18:39
asthmatic and "heavy" type diabetic
Explanation:
It's verlan for "lourd". In other words. That's how it comes to mean "a drag":

"Relou is ‘verlan’ for lourd (literally ‘heavy’ but used to describe someone who is ‘a drag’)."
https://www.frantastique.com/en/french-translation/relou

But here I presume it means prone to overweight.

I suspect that "type relou (lourd)" may be a way of saying type 2 diabetic:

"Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes are overweight or have obesity."
http://tosconnect.obesity.org/obesity/content/weight-diabete...

I'll leave it to you to decide how to express it :-)

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Note added at 38 mins (2018-08-05 14:44:12 GMT)
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There a Parisian woman of 41 whose Instagram profile uses this phrase:

"FR - 41 years old - 🇫🇷 Paris
Lifestyle, Guitar, food, fit, pets, geek, gameuse, pokemon, tattoo, and so many other things. Asthmatique et diabétique de type relou"
http://hotsta.net/pikatchat89

I imagine it's a kind of self-deprecating/humorous/euphemistic expression. But I may be misreading it.

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Note added at 59 mins (2018-08-05 15:05:30 GMT)
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The "fat" type 2 vs "thin" type 1 stereotype is not always true, but it is the popular perception:

"It's not always clear what type of diabetes someone has, despite what many people think.
For instance, the typical assumption is that people with type 2 diabetes will be overweight and not inject insulin, while people with type 1 diabetes will be, if anything, underweight.
But these perceptions just aren't always true. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a healthy weight when diagnosed, and many of them are dependent on insulin.
Similarly, people with type 1 diabetes will in some cases be overweight."
https://www.diabetes.co.uk/difference-between-type1-and-type...

So as I say I think it's fairly likely that "type lourd" may be simply a way of saying "type 2", rather than literally describing oneself as "heavy"/fat.

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Note added at 1 hr (2018-08-05 15:22:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Alex could be right; maybe it simply means that the diabetes (and perhaps the asthma as well) is a drag. I may be barking up the wrong tree with the idea of obesity.

Then again, the following suggests that Tony could be right and "relou" could mean "lourd" is the sense of "serious": i.e. type 1. It's about driving licences:

"Ce décret stipule que les permis définitif ne seront plus délivré aux pathologie de la classe lourde, (diabétique de type 1), (traité par insuline) entre autre que pour être capable de passer le permis nous ne devons pas avoir fait d'hypoglycémie sévère dans les 6 mois précédent l'examen [...]

sont classé (1) dans les pathologies lourdes (liste exhaustive) :
[...]
- diabétiques insulino-dépendant
[...]
Perso, je pense que ce n'est qu'une histoire de fric, en classant le diabète dans le type "lourd", c'est un moyen de pomper le fric, car ils nous obligent maintenant à consulter des médecins de la lois, des médecins spécialistes (Ophtalmo, cardiologue ect/...) dont les dépassements d'honoraires ne sont régit par aucune loi."
http://forum.doctissimo.fr/sante/diabete/conduire-permanent-...

"
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 18:39
Grading comment
Many thanks Charles!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3asthmatic and "heavy" type diabetic
Charles Davis
4 +1of the annoying type
Odette Grille
3dodgy
Melzie
Summary of reference entries provided
Larousse says:
liz askew

Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
dodgy


Explanation:
further context needed for verification

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Note added at 28 mins (2018-08-05 14:34:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

in the sense - not stabalised -

Melzie
Local time: 18:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
asthmatic and "heavy" type diabetic


Explanation:
It's verlan for "lourd". In other words. That's how it comes to mean "a drag":

"Relou is ‘verlan’ for lourd (literally ‘heavy’ but used to describe someone who is ‘a drag’)."
https://www.frantastique.com/en/french-translation/relou

But here I presume it means prone to overweight.

I suspect that "type relou (lourd)" may be a way of saying type 2 diabetic:

"Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes are overweight or have obesity."
http://tosconnect.obesity.org/obesity/content/weight-diabete...

I'll leave it to you to decide how to express it :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2018-08-05 14:44:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

There a Parisian woman of 41 whose Instagram profile uses this phrase:

"FR - 41 years old - 🇫🇷 Paris
Lifestyle, Guitar, food, fit, pets, geek, gameuse, pokemon, tattoo, and so many other things. Asthmatique et diabétique de type relou"
http://hotsta.net/pikatchat89

I imagine it's a kind of self-deprecating/humorous/euphemistic expression. But I may be misreading it.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 59 mins (2018-08-05 15:05:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The "fat" type 2 vs "thin" type 1 stereotype is not always true, but it is the popular perception:

"It's not always clear what type of diabetes someone has, despite what many people think.
For instance, the typical assumption is that people with type 2 diabetes will be overweight and not inject insulin, while people with type 1 diabetes will be, if anything, underweight.
But these perceptions just aren't always true. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a healthy weight when diagnosed, and many of them are dependent on insulin.
Similarly, people with type 1 diabetes will in some cases be overweight."
https://www.diabetes.co.uk/difference-between-type1-and-type...

So as I say I think it's fairly likely that "type lourd" may be simply a way of saying "type 2", rather than literally describing oneself as "heavy"/fat.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2018-08-05 15:22:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Alex could be right; maybe it simply means that the diabetes (and perhaps the asthma as well) is a drag. I may be barking up the wrong tree with the idea of obesity.

Then again, the following suggests that Tony could be right and "relou" could mean "lourd" is the sense of "serious": i.e. type 1. It's about driving licences:

"Ce décret stipule que les permis définitif ne seront plus délivré aux pathologie de la classe lourde, (diabétique de type 1), (traité par insuline) entre autre que pour être capable de passer le permis nous ne devons pas avoir fait d'hypoglycémie sévère dans les 6 mois précédent l'examen [...]

sont classé (1) dans les pathologies lourdes (liste exhaustive) :
[...]
- diabétiques insulino-dépendant
[...]
Perso, je pense que ce n'est qu'une histoire de fric, en classant le diabète dans le type "lourd", c'est un moyen de pomper le fric, car ils nous obligent maintenant à consulter des médecins de la lois, des médecins spécialistes (Ophtalmo, cardiologue ect/...) dont les dépassements d'honoraires ne sont régit par aucune loi."
http://forum.doctissimo.fr/sante/diabete/conduire-permanent-...

"

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 18:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 112
Grading comment
Many thanks Charles!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mchd: En fait, on ne demande pas d'autre précision : le "relou" signifie lourd, parce que le taux est élevé ou contraignant.
2 mins
  -> Merci, mchd !

agree  Tony M: Makes sense, subject to positive confirmation...
14 mins
  -> Thanks, Tony ;-) Hopefully there may be some sort of clue elsewhere in the ST.

disagree  Alex Grimaldi: Not sure extrapolating to heavy or type 2 is relevant here. Especially if this is a description by the patient. I think 8n this case they are just really annoyed by their asthma and diabetes
33 mins
  -> Thanks for the comment. Could be. // But although I have doubts about the body weight/type 2 interpretation, I'm not convinced it means annoying. I've just posted another reference which points to "lourd" meaning "serious" i.e. type 1 (as Tony said).

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: You could say "heavy-duty" diabetes, to keep the meaning but to make it a little idiomatic in English.
2 hrs
  -> That's a thought! Thanks, Nikki :-)

neutral  liz askew: "relou" is a bone fide word, so I think this is a misinterpretation, FWIW
20 hrs
  -> Thanks, Liz. Could be.

agree  Dr Lofthouse
20 hrs
  -> Thanks!
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
of the annoying type


Explanation:
But then, as a more familiar equivalent I offer : pesky or cursed

with pesky asthma and diabetes

or cursed with asthma and diabetes

Odette Grille
Canada
Local time: 12:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 7

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  liz askew: tedious, annoying, irksome, boring, etc. etc. https://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/relou/67916
23 hrs
  -> Merci, surtout avec référence !
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Reference comments


3 hrs
Reference: Larousse says:

Reference information:
https://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais/relou/67916

Familier. Qui est sans finesse ou pénible, ennuyeux : Il répète toujours la même chose, c'est relou son truc !

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Note added at 3 hrs (2018-08-05 17:37:20 GMT)
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https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=ErryHVxTtXkC&pg=PT34&lpg...


tedious/relentless/boring/day after day aspect

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Note added at 3 hrs (2018-08-05 17:38:29 GMT)
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i.e.
diabetic shenanegans

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Note added at 3 hrs (2018-08-05 17:39:53 GMT)
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I quite like "rigmarole" too:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/305536.php
26 Jan 2016 - This regular rigmarole is necessary to keep blood glucose levels within ... The blood sugar monitor takes the glucose levels in the blood every 5 ...

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Note added at 1 day 1 hr (2018-08-06 15:50:53 GMT)
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https://www.lingoda.com/en/blog/french-slang

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Note added at 1 day 1 hr (2018-08-06 15:51:45 GMT)
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https://www.reddit.com/r/French/.../how_to_say_compound_verb...
25 Oct 2015 - 3 posts - ‎1 author
"T'es putain de relou" (verlan for "lourd"=annoying) is used a lot where ... C'est un type d'argot propre au français et je ne vois pas pourquoi les .

liz askew
United Kingdom
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2303
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