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plouf

English translation: turkey, sled

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:plouf
English translation:turkey, sled
Entered by: Sheila Wilson
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21:50 Dec 21, 2010
French to English translations [PRO]
Science - Meteorology / cumulus clouds / thermals / gliding
French term or phrase: plouf
There's one reference to "plouf" in KudoZ Eng>Fr, here: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/english_to_french/general_conversa...

However, I'm sure "dunking booth" doesn't fit the context here and I can't really see how to treat it as onomatopoeic e.g. splash. It's used three times in a long text about how paragliders can make the best use of the thermals found in and around cumulus clouds.

Here is the context around each usage:

3°) Avec un écart faible et se résorbant en 1000 à 1500m d’élévation:
Il faut beaucoup de soleil pour produire des thermiques mais qui s’étiolent avec l’altitude. Les cumulus ont un développement vertical faible à moyen. La, c’est faiblement instable, attention aux *** ploufs. ***

4°) Avec un écart inexistant ou très faible (se résorbant sur quelques centaines de mètres):
Ce sera juste *** un plouf. ***

....

b) L’iso-thermie est épaisse, au dessus existe un gradient thermique peu favorable à la croissance d’un thermique, et l’ensoleillement est modeste : il est fort probable que cela produise les mêmes effets qu’une situation stable, ou avec inversion. Ca sent *** le plouf *** à plein nez.
Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 21:58
turkey, land in the turkey patch
Explanation:
But only if you're South African, I think.

• Plouf: nom masc. bruit caracteristique d'aquarissage d'un parapentiste qui préfère se poser dans une rivière, un lac , la mer plutôt que de faire comme tout le monde, un atterrissage sur l'attéro officiel Voir sens homonyme du mot "tas" plus haut, à la rubrique <faire un "tas"> (remarque: comme aurait dit ©Descartes: "toutes les hypothèses se recoupent")
http://desencyclopedie.wikia.com/wiki/Parapente

Un plouf est un vol durant lequel LE PARAPENTE NE FAIT QUE PERDRE DE L'ALTITUDE.
On peut faire un plouf PARCEQU'ON N'A PAS REUSSI A TROUVER/EXPLOITER LES ASCENDANCES ou en LES FUYANT VOLONTAIREMENT pour faire un tranquille vol contemplatif ou des exercices de pilotage. Tout parapentiste débute sa carrière par quelques dizaines de ploufs pour acquérir un niveau de pilotage suffisant pour se frotter aux turbulences associées aux ascendances thermiques.
Dans une masse d'air stable ou en début de journée lorsque la convection thermique n'est pas encore suffisamment en place les vols se résument souvent à des ploufs.
Le plouf s'intègre très bien dans la pratique du vol rando, lorsqu'après une longue montée il est agréable de faire un vol tranquille en contemplant le paysage plutôt que de consacrer de l'énergie à exploiter des ascendances.
http://www.wiki-parapente.fr/wiki/Plouf

I found that the "turkey patch" is the designated landing zone for people that don't find lift, so looked for "turkeying" and found this :

On several flights at Porterville and other sites in Cape Town, I managed to get away where others TURKEYED, topped out higher than the rest, and made transitions I would have thought impossible on my Jumbe.
http://www.paraglidingforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=2326

However, "turkey patch" and therefore "turkey" as a verb seems to be distinctly South Offrikan:

as a rule, on days that i am dressed in arctic clothing, i usually end up sweating and cursing in the TURKEY PATCH at the bottom
http://www.paraglidingforum.com/viewtopic.php?p=71935

If you are a mega competitive racing pilot you get to bomb out in TURKEY PATCH on the first day and ...
www.eternitypress.co.za/freshair/compclass.htm

The possibilities are endless but I in the meantime would just be happy to “foefie” (fly straight down to landing) down to THE TURKEY PATCH [ ... ] The real pilots were waiting for the ‘conditions to be right’. Finally I get the all clear and get airborne without publicly humiliating myself. I fly out and immediately hit some lift which my brother on take off assured me drew a gasp from the crowd who noticing the lift suddenly got eager to get airborne. I floated high above the endless fields of the farmlands, ALL TOO SOON LOSING HEIGHT (unlike those real pilots now circling high above) AND LANDING IN THE TURKEY PATCH. Rather chuffed with my ‘little foefie I returned to takeoff and with conditions getting considerably stronger, my flying was done – time to watch the pros in action
http://www.livecapetown.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/Lea...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 45 mins (2010-12-21 22:36:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, I realize that first ref. IS in the Désencyclopédie, but I still can't help thinking it's true to at least some extent.
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 22:58
Grading comment
Spot on, Bourth, with "turkey" and "foefie" being used in S.Africa. "Sled" turns out to be the more general jargon verb. Thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5air pocketjardinero
4turkey, land in the turkey patchxxxBourth
4downdraftcc in nyc
3air pocket
B D Finch
Summary of reference entries provided
ploufpolyglot45

Discussion entries: 10





  

Answers


40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
turkey, land in the turkey patch


Explanation:
But only if you're South African, I think.

• Plouf: nom masc. bruit caracteristique d'aquarissage d'un parapentiste qui préfère se poser dans une rivière, un lac , la mer plutôt que de faire comme tout le monde, un atterrissage sur l'attéro officiel Voir sens homonyme du mot "tas" plus haut, à la rubrique <faire un "tas"> (remarque: comme aurait dit ©Descartes: "toutes les hypothèses se recoupent")
http://desencyclopedie.wikia.com/wiki/Parapente

Un plouf est un vol durant lequel LE PARAPENTE NE FAIT QUE PERDRE DE L'ALTITUDE.
On peut faire un plouf PARCEQU'ON N'A PAS REUSSI A TROUVER/EXPLOITER LES ASCENDANCES ou en LES FUYANT VOLONTAIREMENT pour faire un tranquille vol contemplatif ou des exercices de pilotage. Tout parapentiste débute sa carrière par quelques dizaines de ploufs pour acquérir un niveau de pilotage suffisant pour se frotter aux turbulences associées aux ascendances thermiques.
Dans une masse d'air stable ou en début de journée lorsque la convection thermique n'est pas encore suffisamment en place les vols se résument souvent à des ploufs.
Le plouf s'intègre très bien dans la pratique du vol rando, lorsqu'après une longue montée il est agréable de faire un vol tranquille en contemplant le paysage plutôt que de consacrer de l'énergie à exploiter des ascendances.
http://www.wiki-parapente.fr/wiki/Plouf

I found that the "turkey patch" is the designated landing zone for people that don't find lift, so looked for "turkeying" and found this :

On several flights at Porterville and other sites in Cape Town, I managed to get away where others TURKEYED, topped out higher than the rest, and made transitions I would have thought impossible on my Jumbe.
http://www.paraglidingforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=2326

However, "turkey patch" and therefore "turkey" as a verb seems to be distinctly South Offrikan:

as a rule, on days that i am dressed in arctic clothing, i usually end up sweating and cursing in the TURKEY PATCH at the bottom
http://www.paraglidingforum.com/viewtopic.php?p=71935

If you are a mega competitive racing pilot you get to bomb out in TURKEY PATCH on the first day and ...
www.eternitypress.co.za/freshair/compclass.htm

The possibilities are endless but I in the meantime would just be happy to “foefie” (fly straight down to landing) down to THE TURKEY PATCH [ ... ] The real pilots were waiting for the ‘conditions to be right’. Finally I get the all clear and get airborne without publicly humiliating myself. I fly out and immediately hit some lift which my brother on take off assured me drew a gasp from the crowd who noticing the lift suddenly got eager to get airborne. I floated high above the endless fields of the farmlands, ALL TOO SOON LOSING HEIGHT (unlike those real pilots now circling high above) AND LANDING IN THE TURKEY PATCH. Rather chuffed with my ‘little foefie I returned to takeoff and with conditions getting considerably stronger, my flying was done – time to watch the pros in action
http://www.livecapetown.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/Lea...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 45 mins (2010-12-21 22:36:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, I realize that first ref. IS in the Désencyclopédie, but I still can't help thinking it's true to at least some extent.

xxxBourth
Local time: 22:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 10
Grading comment
Spot on, Bourth, with "turkey" and "foefie" being used in S.Africa. "Sled" turns out to be the more general jargon verb. Thanks.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Actually, I found your first ref really useful. A lot of terms from my text are in there correctly, if somewhat weirdly, defined. I think the turkey is actually a red herring, though.:-)

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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
air pocket


Explanation:
"The plane hit an "air pocket" which caused it to drop 300 feet. Nine passengers including one pregnant woman and three crew members suffered ..."
www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread398591/pg1

Though they don't really exist:

"The first type of turbulence is found at high altitudes, often referred to as ‘air pockets’. There is no such thing as an air pocket, it is not physically possible to get a ‘pocket’ of air, but it is a commonly used term that describes the feeling of a sudden drop when flying."
http://www.fearfreeflying.co.uk/why-turbulence-not-usually-d...

B D Finch
France
Local time: 22:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
air pocket


Explanation:
not usual way in french ,we would better say "trou d'air " than plouf that is used here for the fun and give "life" to the story ,

jardinero
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in French Middle (ca.1400-1600)French Middle (ca.1400-1600)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  B D Finch: I realise you are new to the site, but it is usual to agree with or comment on an answer already given rather than post the same proposed answer oneself. Might be worth looking at the KudoZ rules.
1 day 2 hrs
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1 day 16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
downdraft


Explanation:
Ah, so the context is paraskiing (not plane gliding).

Still... my answer is entirely prosaic, and without onomatopoeia.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day16 hrs (2010-12-23 14:20:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or perhaps a downwind landing? " Shifting winds can cause a crosswind or downwind landing which have a higher potential for injury due to the wind speed adding to the landing speed." (same Reference)

Example sentence(s):
  • In conditions of strong winds, and turbulence during hot days the parachutist can be caught in downdrafts close to the ground.

    Reference: http://www.reference.com/browse/para-ski
cc in nyc
Local time: 16:58
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
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Reference comments


8 mins
Reference: plouf

Reference information:
Plouf - WikipédiaPlouf » est une onomatopée reproduisant le bruit émis par un objet tombant ... L'Abord-à-Plouffe désigne une partie du quartier de Chomedey à Laval, Québec. ...
fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plouf - En cache - Pages similaires

polyglot45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
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