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musique étoilée

English translation: celestial/ethereal music

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12:03 Dec 3, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Music / music
French term or phrase: musique étoilée
En 1989, c'est la recontre avec Robert COINEL et sa musique étoiléé qui a depuis donné naissance à plusieurs oeuvres
bewley
Local time: 19:32
English translation:celestial/ethereal music
Explanation:
I would think "étoilée" might refer to the atmosphere created by the music?

but I would be afraid to use celestial/ethereal without knowing more about his music - might be too new age-y.

might help to know who it was who met M. Coinel in 1989?




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Note added at 9 hrs 45 mins (2003-12-03 21:49:08 GMT)
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if only we could download something! I\'m beginning to think this is a dangerous exercise - we might go from starry to stellar to celestial to star-studded to twinkly and before you know it it\'ll be space music...;0)
Selected response from:

Rachel Vanarsdall
Local time: 14:32
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
1 +3celestial/ethereal music
Rachel Vanarsdall
4glitteringly successful musicCHE124
3 +1starry music
irat56
5 -1much prizedJane Lamb-Ruiz
1 +2"that has won lots of awards"
Tony M
1 +1stellar music
Richard Benham


  

Answers


30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +2
musique étoilée
"that has won lots of awards"


Explanation:
I don't know if this idea is applicable here, but I have originally come across 'étoilé' to refer to chefs who have been awarded Michelin stars; and I think I have subsequently encountered it extended to other domains.

Sorry I can't confirm with a handy reference, but it's just to give you food for thought!


Tony M
France
Local time: 20:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 42

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: A possibility, and not inconsistent with Richard's suggestion, below.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Chris!

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: I agree but it's kinda long, Dusty...it means that has won many prizes as others failed to detect...
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Jane! That's why I used quotes: to suggest the idea, not the term, which I'm sure others will be able to suggest a better version of...
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
stellar music


Explanation:
This is a word often used in this sort of context. I must admit, I don't know what people really mean by it, but then again I'm not too sure about "musique étoilée" either. At least the reference to stars is preserved, for what that's worth.

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Note added at 2003-12-03 16:05:43 (GMT)
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For the benefit of the less intellectual elements of the ProZ.com community, I feel obliged to point out the following. When I say I don\'t know what people mean by something, it is not actually an admission of a defect in my vocabulary (although, unlike some of those unintellectual elements, I do actually admit to needing a dictionary at times). Rather, it is a polite way of saying that the usage is vague and has little connection with the received meaning of the term used.

So, for example, if music is described as \"étoilée\", this cannot be taken literally (sprinkled with stars,...). It could mean, as Dusty suggests, having won some \"stars\" in the form of awards. However, this is just one possibility and, given a vague source-language term, it is better to translate it with a similarly vague target-language term. So I chose \"stellar\", which retains the \"star\" metaphor (for those of us who have at least a high-school education) and is similarly vague but complimentary. It has overtones of \"glittering\", \"star-studded\", etc., without being as concrete. These overtones are obviously also present with \"étoilée\".

I know all this reasoning will be lost on those whose favoured form of argument is to put their fingers in their ears and scream, but I prefer to appeal to the more rational among us.

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Note added at 2003-12-03 17:04:13 (GMT)
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On \"much prized\": even with the requisite hyphen, this would be a blunder. \"Prized\" does not mean \"having won prizes\", it means \"valued\", \"highly esteemed\",.... How this relates to \"étoilée\" is hard to fathom.

On \"starry\": of course it possible to imagine certain sorts of music being described as \"starry\" in English, this would be a rather strong metaphor, and it is difficult to justify it, unless one has some familiarity with monsieur Coinel\'s music. Ash Ra Tempel, perhaps....

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Note added at 2003-12-03 18:46:26 (GMT)
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For those who favour the celestial/starry/ethereal line, what about \"astral\"? Like \"stellar\" and \"étoilée\", has a connection with stars. Personally, I think it is going out on too much of a limb, like some of the other suggestions. I think \"stellar\" is neutral: it suggests glittering prizes as well as starry skies....

Richard Benham
France
Local time: 20:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: A possibility, and not inconsistent with Dusty's suggestion, above.
19 mins
  -> Thanks. Yes. That is one connotation, and one which I intended (cf "stellar career").

disagree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: I have to say that your comment irks me. If you don't know that stellar means outstanding then you shouldn't use it...because your use of it here is quite simply wrong..
43 mins
  -> Of course I know what "stellar" means. It doesn't mean "outstanding", although it may be used figuartively in this sense. It means "concerned with stars".

agree  William Stein: The French is a metaphor, not a cliché, and stellar evokes the same wealth of connotations as "étoilée". (nothing to justify a traffic ticket from the anti-thought police)
1 hr
  -> Thanks William.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
much prized


Explanation:
another way....

I don't understand why people are translators if they don't enjoy sentences such as these...

they should change professions

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Note added at 2003-12-03 15:38:44 (GMT)
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much prized does to English what etoilée does to French...


hah!

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Note added at 2003-12-08 15:38:35 (GMT)
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Note to Richard:

Of course stellar means about or relating to stars but when used journalistically or literarily it means outstanding. An etoile in French does refer to prizes....

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Richard Benham: Much prized? By whom? Where is there even a connection with the original?
16 mins
  -> becaue Richard an étoile is a SYMBOL of an award in French...ergo, much prized...translation is about the meaning of the words not transposition of words!
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
musique étoilée
starry music


Explanation:
Why not?

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Note added at 3 hrs 37 mins (2003-12-03 15:41:10 GMT)
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I\'d rather think it has nothing to do with prizes or whatsoever...

irat56
France
Local time: 20:32
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Richard Benham: Because it doesn't make sense?
2 hrs
  -> Oh yes it does! But not "technical" enough for some, I guess!

neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: no it is simply not meaningful
3 hrs
  -> Your opinion!
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +3
musique étoilée
celestial/ethereal music


Explanation:
I would think "étoilée" might refer to the atmosphere created by the music?

but I would be afraid to use celestial/ethereal without knowing more about his music - might be too new age-y.

might help to know who it was who met M. Coinel in 1989?




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs 45 mins (2003-12-03 21:49:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

if only we could download something! I\'m beginning to think this is a dangerous exercise - we might go from starry to stellar to celestial to star-studded to twinkly and before you know it it\'ll be space music...;0)

Rachel Vanarsdall
Local time: 14:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Richard Benham: Definitely a possibility. Would help to hear some of the music, too....
8 mins
  -> indeed it would...

agree  William Stein: Chopin, la musique étoilée sur un piano qui sombre, émotions diurnes.
43 mins

agree  Laurel Porter: not a bad idea... let's all download an MP3 and put this puppy to bed! (How poetic, Wm!)
1 hr

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: I totally agree with your last comment.
4 days
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11 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
glitteringly successful music


Explanation:
conveys the image of the star as well as that of the highly prized nature of the music, without being too literal.
Or again, his "star-quality music"... but that's a bit boring.

CHE124
New Zealand
Local time: 08:32
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