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courtier

English translation: courtier

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:courtier
English translation:courtier
Entered by: Evert DELOOF-SYS
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13:20 Nov 17, 2001
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
/ French History
French term or phrase: courtier
The rule of Louis XIV and the switch from the nobility of the sword to the nobility of the robe.
dj ptkilla
courtier
Explanation:
remains 'courtier' in English.

"... The Courtier's Life. by Sir Thomas Wyatt In court to serve decked with fresh array,
Of sug'red meats feeling the sweet repast: The life in banquets, and sundry ..."

www.luminarium.org/renlit/court.htm
Selected response from:

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 01:13
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +5courtier
Evert DELOOF-SYS
5courtisan, gens de la Cour
irat56
5brokerMarcos Serrano
4courtier
Nikki Scott-Despaigne


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
courtier


Explanation:
remains 'courtier' in English.

"... The Courtier's Life. by Sir Thomas Wyatt In court to serve decked with fresh array,
Of sug'red meats feeling the sweet repast: The life in banquets, and sundry ..."

www.luminarium.org/renlit/court.htm

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 01:13
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 287
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  VBaby
0 min

agree  Helen D. Elliot: courtier: a person often present at the court of a king, queen, etc. cf Gage
2 mins

disagree  Marcos Serrano: French "courtier" is English "broker".
2 hrs
  -> disagree - 'broker' and 'courtier'

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4 hrs

agree  reliable: Reliable
10 hrs

agree  mckinnc
17 hrs

agree  xxxAbu Amaal: See also Castiglione's "The Courtier", still in print after all these years
1 day 7 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
broker


Explanation:
courtier in French means broker, a financial or commercial transaction broker. It derives from "courratier", from an older form of "courir", "courre", conveying the idea that the broker is one who "runs" between the parties involved in the transaction

The French word which goes into English as "courtier" is "courtisan, homme ou dame de cour"


    usage, etymological dictionaries
Marcos Serrano
Australia
Local time: 11:13

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Yes, it can and does mean "broker", but not exclusively. See below.
2 hrs
  -> Nikki, the original question by DJ Ptkilla is: translate the French "courtier" into English: "broker". The English "courtier" is in French "courtisan", feminine "dame de cour" since the original "courtisane" acquired a pejorative connotation.
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
courtier


Explanation:
I agree with Elvert's posting. Note that "courtesan" would appear to be a female version of "courtier", the connotation of the latter being wholly derogatory, which is not the case for the former - hmmm. Sheer flattery for the chaps and prostitution for the girls. Food for thought!


http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary

One entry found for courtier.

Main Entry: cour·tier
Pronunciation: 'kOr-tE-&r, 'kor-; 'kOrt-y&r, 'kort-; 'kOr-ch&r, 'kor-
Function: noun
Date: 14th century
1 : one in attendance at a royal court
2 : one who practices flattery


http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?va=courtesan

One entry found for courtesan.

Main Entry: cour·te·san
Pronunciation: 'kOr-t&-z&n, 'kor-, -"zan also 'k&r-, -"zän; esp British "kor-t&-'zan
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle French courtisane, from northern Italian dialect form of Italian cortigiana woman courtier, feminine of cortigiano courtier, from corte court, from Latin cohort-, cohors
Date: 1533
: a prostitute with a courtly , wealthy, or upper-class clientele


http://www.bartleby.com/215/1412.html

The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
Volume V. The Drama to 1642, Part One.

XIV. Some Political and Social Aspects of the Later Elizabethan and Earlier Stewart Period.

§ 12. Education of the Courtier.

In this sketch of the complete training of an English gentleman, as in the early life of the actual Sidney and the Hamlet of the tragedy, the element of foreign travel must not be over-looked. There was not much travelling at home (partly in consequence of the state of the roads, which forced even the queen to make most of her progresses on horseback). Even more than in the earlier days of the English renascence, Italy, with all its great memories and treasures, and with all its charms and seductions, was the favourite resort of English travellers, and such it remained during the long reach of years which bridge the interval between the times of Ascham and those of Milton. 31 The frequency with which the Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists lay the scenes of their plays in Italy, no doubt, was originally due to the use made by them of Italian fiction; but we often find a play localised in Italy for no better reason than deference to custom, or the possibility of greater freedom of movement.


http://www.bankeside.org/history.html

A Brief History of Rapier Fighting in 16th century England
Castigliones book, The Courtier , had an enormous impact on the Elizabethans. From it the English ruling class derived much of its ideal of the soldier / poet / scientist / statesman ideal. The first and foremost for the courtier must be their abilities with manly weapons:

"I hold that the principal and true profession of the Courtier must be that of arms."


Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 01:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
courtisan, gens de la Cour


Explanation:
These noble gentlemen used to 'court" the King for...kudos!

irat56
France
Local time: 01:13
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 380

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Marcos Serrano: but "irat56" is offering an answer in the wrong direction: from English into French. DJ Ptkilla's question is French into English. Courtier, as a French word, not an English word. Courtier means broker or middleperson.
1 day 13 hrs
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