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cooperatives

English translation: cooperatives

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:cooperatives
English translation:cooperatives
Entered by: DPolice
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03:41 Dec 6, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
French term or phrase: cooperatives
le developpement des cooperatives-is it spelt co-operatives or cooperatives in English?
mclawlor
cooperatives
Explanation:
both spellings are accepted in The New Collins Concise dictionay but "cooperatives" is given as the "Standard" spelling, whatever that may mean nowadays.
Selected response from:

DPolice
Local time: 12:37
Grading comment
thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3cooperative
Sheila Hardie
4 +2cooperativesDPolice
5both
Parrot
4cooperatives
Patricia Posadas


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
cooperatives


Explanation:
Merriam Webster gives that

Patricia Posadas
Spain
Local time: 11:37
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 4
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
both


Explanation:
with "cooperatives" statistically doubling "co-operatives". (135,000 to 65,000).


    Google check
Parrot
Spain
Local time: 12:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1861
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
cooperatives


Explanation:
both spellings are accepted in The New Collins Concise dictionay but "cooperatives" is given as the "Standard" spelling, whatever that may mean nowadays.

DPolice
Local time: 12:37
PRO pts in pair: 454
Grading comment
thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Zaltys: Good concise answer!
2 hrs

agree  sujata
4 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
cooperative


Explanation:
I would say both are acceptable, but prefer cooperative without the hyphen myself. I am Scottish, by the way. However, my Word spell-checker for British English insists I put a hyphen in. Here are a few references from various sources. Interestingly enough, the Guardian (a UK newspaper) style guide advises writers to use cooperative WITHOUT the hyphen.

Hope this helps anyway!

Sheila


http://www.rit.edu/~932www/style_guide/abbreviations.html

US Style Guide

Cooperative Education

"Co-op" is acceptable as an abbreviation, but remember, it's "cooperative" without a hyphen. " The Office of Cooperative Education and Career Services" should always be spelled out.

http://www.pr.ufl.edu/w_style/b-c.htm

The UFCN Writing Stylebook

Compiled for the
University of Florida Communications Network
by the
Office of News & Public Affairs.

Updated on 08/24/00

co- -- Retain the hyphen when forming nouns, adjectives and verbs that indicate occupation or status:

* co-author 
* co-pilot
* co-chairman 
* co-respondent (in a divorce suit)
* co-defendant 
* co-signer
* co-host 
* co-star
* co-owner 
* co-worker
* co-partner


(Several are exceptions to Webster's New World in the interests of consistency.) Use no hyphen in other combinations:

* coed 
* cooperate
* coeducation
* cooperative
* coequal 
* coordinate
* coexist 
* coordination
* coexistence


Cooperate, coordinate and related words are exceptions to the rule that a hyphen is used if a prefix ends in a vowel and the word that follows begins with the same vowel.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/styleguide/page/0,5817,184841,00.h...
cooperate, cooperative, cooperation
no hyphen, but the store is the Co-op


CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
Kenneth G. Wilson (1923–).  The Columbia Guide to Standard American English.  1993.
 
co- (prefix)
 
http://www.bartleby.com/68/97/1297.html
 
Three usage questions frequently arise: (1) Does co- mean “equal to” or “subordinate to” when it occurs with words such as coworker and copilot? Answer: it means either and both, and the referents and context will control. A coworker usually is neither subordinate nor superior to a fellow worker, but the copilot is always subordinate to the pilot. (2) Do newly created words using the prefix always begin as slang, or are words such as cohost and co-agent Standard from the start? Answer: such words, and nonce words using the co- prefix as well, are usually Standard almost at once, so long as the concept is clear: for example, sled-dog drivers and their codrivers are probably in the same relationship to their enterprise as pilot and copilot are to theirs: one is captain and in overall charge, and the other is the mate; and only one can actually be at the controls at any given time. (3) How should the co- prefix be attached to the base word, with a hyphen or without? Answer: usually without a space or hyphen (coincidence, coordinate), but occasionally when the base word begins with o (co-opt, co-own—but see also DIERESIS) or when a word is so new as to look odd and risk misreading without a hyphen (co-anchor or co-belligerent), a hyphen will help. The prefix co- means “together, joint,” as in co-owner; “equally, mutually,” as in coextensive, cooperative; “partner with, associate to,” as in coauthor, coproducer, or to cosign [a note]; and “assistant or subordinate to,” as in coadjutor. And sometimes the “equal or subordinate” issue is ambiguous, as in cohost, coanchor. (There are also mathematical senses meaning “complement,” as in cosine, cotangent.) Three other forms occur: col- (before l, as in collaborate); com- (before b, p, and m, as in combine, companion, and commiserate); and con- (before other sounds, as in contaminate).   1
 

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 12:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 679

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carole Muller: about your interesting comment with Word: Word is simply NOT reliable for spell checks. Word is so bothersome in Danish ( W. refuses Danish words, many constructed like "mothertongue",not mother tongue)and Word leaves out MANY spell.mistakes in French
23 mins
  -> that's interesting news Carole, and a bit worrying too, thanks for pointing it out:)

agree  Yolanda Broad: Hyphenization/hyphenisation is on its way out. :-)
2 hrs
  -> yes, it looks like it:)

agree  Saleh Ayyub
4 hrs
  -> thanks:)
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