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foie gras mi-cuit

English translation: lightly cooked

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:mi-cuit
English translation:lightly cooked
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05:33 Nov 22, 2000
French to English translations [PRO]
French term or phrase: foie gras mi-cuit
It's a wonderful French specialty.

If I translate it into "half-cooked fat goose or duck liver" it sounds disgusting!!

I know I should probably keep "foie gras" but what about mi-cuit?

Thanks
Meriem
mi-cuit
Explanation:
A Google search on the whole phrase with language set to English shows it left in French most of the time. I think most people who would eat such a thing would know what "mi-cuit" means. If you really want a nice-sounding English equivalent, how about "lightly cooked"? Wish I could take credit for that one, but I saw it in one of the hits.
Selected response from:

xxxJon Zuber
Grading comment
Thanks for your answer, I'll use it!

Meriem
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nami-cuitxxxJon Zuber
nafoie gras (semi-boiled)
Evert DELOOF-SYS
nalightly-cooked / part-cooked foie gras
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
na -1foie gras (parboiled)Robin Salmon


  

Answers


12 mins
foie gras (semi-boiled)


Explanation:
foie gras: leave it as such

http://eurodic.ip.lu:8086

mi-cuit is indeed half-cooked or half-boiled; I would use 'semi boiled/cooked' (sounds less 'harsh') and put it between brackets

HTH


Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 10:37
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 287

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Frenchloki: Definitely wouldn't put "boiled". Foie gras is cooked gently in a bain-marie. "Boiled" to an English speaker is placed in boiling water and the connotations are not very nice...:-)
5383 days
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1 hr peer agreement (net): -1
foie gras (parboiled)


Explanation:
"Parboiled" is a common English cookery term (although it usually refers to potatoes!)

It still might be better than "semi-boiled".

Robin Salmon
Australia
Local time: 19:37
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 164

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Frenchloki: See my remarks above. anything that suggests the foie gras has been placed in water, whether boiling or not, is sacrilege to a food lover.
5383 days
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2 hrs
mi-cuit


Explanation:
A Google search on the whole phrase with language set to English shows it left in French most of the time. I think most people who would eat such a thing would know what "mi-cuit" means. If you really want a nice-sounding English equivalent, how about "lightly cooked"? Wish I could take credit for that one, but I saw it in one of the hits.

xxxJon Zuber
PRO pts in pair: 24
Grading comment
Thanks for your answer, I'll use it!

Meriem

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Ana.uk
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs
lightly-cooked / part-cooked foie gras


Explanation:
Depends what they have done with it...

In any event, don't translate foie gras. My Dictionnaire Gastronomique (La Maison du Dictionnaire (1997), Bernard LUCE, leaves it as is. Translating it would be sacriligious!

Nikki


    Dictionnaire Gastronomique, Bernard LUCE
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 10:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
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