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"Le nom s'ajoutera a la liste" a la difference de "Le nom sera ajoute a liste."

English translation: They have the same meaning: "The name will be added to the list."

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Le nom s'ajoutera a la liste" and "Le nom sera ajoute a liste
English translation:They have the same meaning: "The name will be added to the list."
Entered by: Kenn Lambing
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08:32 Dec 29, 2000
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: "Le nom s'ajoutera a la liste" a la difference de "Le nom sera ajoute a liste."
I have been doing this translation into English, and am wondering why I the French in some cases use the reflexive in the future (s'ajoutera in this instance) and other times use the future of "etre" + past participle (e.g. le colis sera envoye). They would not say "le colis s'enverra." Or is there perhaps a difference of meaning that I have never taken notice of?
Same situation goes with "la voiture a ete impliquee dans l'accident" as compared to "la voiture etait impliquee." What is going on here?
There is a difference of meaning in this case?

Thanks for any suggestions,
Matt
Mkbug209@cs.com
Matt
They have the same meaning
Explanation:
In the case of "Le nom s'ajoutera a la liste" and "Le nom sera ajoute a liste" they mean the same thing. The first construction merely avoids the passive voice which many people try to avoid.
In the other case: "la voiture a ete impliquee dans l'accident" and "la voiture etait impliquee", these are two different tenses. The first is the passive passe compose and the second is in the imperfect. The first sentences indicates a completely finished act. The second indicates an act that was occuring WHILE another act was occurring.

Selected response from:

Kenn Lambing
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3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naThey have the same meaningKenn Lambing
na[picky footnote on "impliquer"]Heathcliff
naI have observed that
Parrot
napassive voiceSamanda
naétait and a étéSamanda


  

Answers


19 mins
était and a été


Explanation:
Etait is imparfait and a été is passé composé.
I would translate the first sentence:
"The car was implicated (implied. . .) in the accident."
The second would be, "The car was being implicated in the accident."

Imperfect communicates a descriptive, narrative, or habitual action, where Passé composé expresses a distinct, point-in-time action.

I am checking on the reflexive + future vs. the future perfect. I am not sure but will be with you asap.

Bonne chance.

Samanda
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42 mins
passive voice


Explanation:
Your question puzzled me - I didn't remember anything about reflexive and future ensemble! But I believe the answer lies in the voice of your verb It is possible to use a reflexive to make a verb passive in French. I believe that is happening here. You could translate the first sentence: "The name will be added to the list." You could translate the second sentence in the same way. Likely, I would choose the second way, although the first might be more "slick" to the French ear.

Bonne chance.


    French for Oral and Written Review, 5th ed. Charles Carlut and Walter Meiden. (Harcourt Brace) p. 205-206.
Samanda
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1 hr
I have observed that


Explanation:
the passé composé is more frequently used in spoken French, whereas in written French, when a sustained time period is implied, it is the imparfait.
With regards to the future, the two tenses mean just about the same thing, but the English rendering should take into account whether the grammatical future ("the package will be sent") is implied, or whether it is 3rd person imperative future ("the package shall be sent" - because it HAS TO BE SENT).

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 12:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1861
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6 hrs
[picky footnote on "impliquer"]


Explanation:
It's another of those annoying "false friends." In English, cars are _ involved_ in collisions or accidents -- rarely "implicated" (that would refer, if at all, to the driver rather than to the vehicle) and never "implied."

Yours for meaning-based translation,
HC



Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 03:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 953
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3 days 6 hrs
They have the same meaning


Explanation:
In the case of "Le nom s'ajoutera a la liste" and "Le nom sera ajoute a liste" they mean the same thing. The first construction merely avoids the passive voice which many people try to avoid.
In the other case: "la voiture a ete impliquee dans l'accident" and "la voiture etait impliquee", these are two different tenses. The first is the passive passe compose and the second is in the imperfect. The first sentences indicates a completely finished act. The second indicates an act that was occuring WHILE another act was occurring.



Kenn Lambing
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