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tetes blanches

English translation: grey heads

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:tetes blanches
English translation:grey heads
Entered by: Louise Atfield
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11:38 Jan 1, 2001
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: tetes blanches
Gambling context: PMU--a kind of off-treck betting popular in the US, becoming more mainstream in French society.

The sentence: Cette tradition qui ne semblait attirer plus que des tetes blanches se met a la mode du jour.

I would translate the above sentence as: This tradition seemed to no longer only attract -----
is becoming (contemporary) style or en vogue.


By the way, is this sentence grammatically in tune?:
On n'est pas tellement d'accord avec ca ici au Journal Francais (yeah, I know Journal Francais should be in italics)! Though, I am convinced it should read..."chez Journal Francais", not "au Journal Francais."

Thank you for suggestions,
Matt
Matt
grey heads
Explanation:
Hi again Matt,

More and more, at least here in Canada, the term "grey heads" is used to mean older people. You will also hear the term "grey power", when talking about the clout that older people now have with the government, due to their sheer number and to their being more politically active.

"Au Journal Français" is the proper expression. In the same way, you will hear "au Journal de Montréal", "à La Presse", "à l'Hôtel de Ville", "au magasin de La Baie", "au poste de police", etc., etc. It doesn't matter whether "Journal" is part of a proper name, it is still thought of as a journal.

And I disagree: Never, ever, will you use "chez" in this instance. It would sound really wrong. "Chez" will be used when talking about someone's place "chez moi", "chez mes parents", "chez Pierre", and occasionally when talking about a store "j'ai acheté cela chez Provigo", where the name Provigo is used as if it were the name of a person. But, as state above, you would say "au magasin Provigo".

Of course, you use "au" or "à la" depending of whether the name is masculine of feminine". In your case, Journal is masculine, hence the word "au".

Hope this makes sense a little...
Selected response from:

Louise Atfield
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nagrey headsLouise Atfield
nathe older generationAna.uk
naelderly or golden ageMaryse Benhoff


  

Answers


6 mins
elderly or golden age


Explanation:
However, your sentance translation should read as follows:

This tradition which no longer attracts only the elderly (or the golden age crowd) is becoming quite stylish.

Rather than using a double negative.


    Reference: http://www.termium.com
Maryse Benhoff
Local time: 19:46
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs
the older generation


Explanation:
This tradition which no longer seemed to attract anyone other than the older generation is now becoming fashionable.

As for the other question, I think:

On n'est pas tellement d'accord avec ça, ici au Journal Français...

I think a comma after "ça" would be clearer, or it might look like "ça ici", if you see what I mean.

I think either "à" or "chez" would be fine, being a proper noun.
But I wouldn't use "au". You could
use "au" if you were saying "au journal"(common noun).

I did a brief stunt at Sud Ouest newspaper in Bordeaux, and I regularly heard: chez Sud Ouest, à Sud Ouest...

Hope it's helpful. All the best!



Ana.uk
Local time: 00:46
PRO pts in pair: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days 6 hrs
grey heads


Explanation:
Hi again Matt,

More and more, at least here in Canada, the term "grey heads" is used to mean older people. You will also hear the term "grey power", when talking about the clout that older people now have with the government, due to their sheer number and to their being more politically active.

"Au Journal Français" is the proper expression. In the same way, you will hear "au Journal de Montréal", "à La Presse", "à l'Hôtel de Ville", "au magasin de La Baie", "au poste de police", etc., etc. It doesn't matter whether "Journal" is part of a proper name, it is still thought of as a journal.

And I disagree: Never, ever, will you use "chez" in this instance. It would sound really wrong. "Chez" will be used when talking about someone's place "chez moi", "chez mes parents", "chez Pierre", and occasionally when talking about a store "j'ai acheté cela chez Provigo", where the name Provigo is used as if it were the name of a person. But, as state above, you would say "au magasin Provigo".

Of course, you use "au" or "à la" depending of whether the name is masculine of feminine". In your case, Journal is masculine, hence the word "au".

Hope this makes sense a little...

Louise Atfield
PRO pts in pair: 300

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
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