KudoZ home » French to English » Other

suspensions à pincettes

English translation: full elliptic(al) suspension (?)

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:suspension à pincettes
English translation:full elliptic(al) suspension (?)
Entered by: Yolanda Broad
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

11:47 May 23, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
/ Horse-drawn vehicles
French term or phrase: suspensions à pincettes
Description of horse-drawn carriage. Type of suspension. Context: "Voiture Marathon à 4 roue bandages pleins avec suspensions à pincettes"
Nicky Over
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:58
full elliptic(al) suspension (?)
Explanation:
Yeah, folks, leave me the hard ones!

I SUSPECT these are full elliptic springs. "Usual" eliptic springs are semi-elliptic. My first car (Austin Healey) had quarter elliptic rear suspension, which introduced a phenomenon of rear wheel steering before the notion was even invented!

In full-elliptic suspension, you have TWO curved leaf (or sets of leaf) springs positioned to form an ellipse, or almond or eye shape. In my minds eye I see a pair of these on each axle, arranged fore-and-aft like the semi-elliptic springs on more modern vehicles. They make a vehicle higher than might otherwise be necessary, but when dealing with wagon wheels it's hardly a problem.

Why I think this may be called "pincettes" in French is that if you look at one end of the suspension, where the two (sets of) leaves come together (ignoring the other and) it looks like the end of a pair of tweezers.

You can see a photo of a full eliptical (their spelling) spring on a horse-drawn carriage at http://www.off-road.com/jeep/tech/Susp.html. In this case it is arranged transversally, beneath the seat.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-23 13:19:28 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Confirmation: there\'s a picture of \"suspension à pincettes\" (the fore-and-aft kind) at http://perso.wanadoo.fr/a.delignieres/rm/rm_9-10_99.htm
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 20:58
Grading comment
Brilliant answer - thanks a million!
Nicky Over
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
2 +1full elliptic(al) suspension (?)xxxBourth


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
full elliptic(al) suspension (?)


Explanation:
Yeah, folks, leave me the hard ones!

I SUSPECT these are full elliptic springs. "Usual" eliptic springs are semi-elliptic. My first car (Austin Healey) had quarter elliptic rear suspension, which introduced a phenomenon of rear wheel steering before the notion was even invented!

In full-elliptic suspension, you have TWO curved leaf (or sets of leaf) springs positioned to form an ellipse, or almond or eye shape. In my minds eye I see a pair of these on each axle, arranged fore-and-aft like the semi-elliptic springs on more modern vehicles. They make a vehicle higher than might otherwise be necessary, but when dealing with wagon wheels it's hardly a problem.

Why I think this may be called "pincettes" in French is that if you look at one end of the suspension, where the two (sets of) leaves come together (ignoring the other and) it looks like the end of a pair of tweezers.

You can see a photo of a full eliptical (their spelling) spring on a horse-drawn carriage at http://www.off-road.com/jeep/tech/Susp.html. In this case it is arranged transversally, beneath the seat.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-23 13:19:28 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Confirmation: there\'s a picture of \"suspension à pincettes\" (the fore-and-aft kind) at http://perso.wanadoo.fr/a.delignieres/rm/rm_9-10_99.htm

xxxBourth
Local time: 20:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 18679
Grading comment
Brilliant answer - thanks a million!
Nicky Over

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: http://www.off-road.com/jeep/images/fullelip.jpg : The disadvatages here are that it puts a *lot* of stress on the axles (hence their "bombé" form & it makes the carriage very high & hard to mount.Second example solves (partly) the first problem.
46 mins
  -> Saw there was a Jeep site but couldn't figure our the connection with horses!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search