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Ca vous dit, une cuisse de pouletfrites?

English translation: See below

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22:03 Apr 21, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
French term or phrase: Ca vous dit, une cuisse de pouletfrites?
From a website for children of the name "POULETFRITES". The paragraph goes:
"Alors, si l'envie d'avoir votre rond de serviette à notre table vous tente, si vous avez des bannières dans un tiroir qui ne demandent qu'à sortir, si votre talent souhaite s'épanouir sur un joli site, ou que vos produits concernent nos publics, contactez-nous, nous étudierons volontiers toutes vos propositions. Ca vous dit, une cuisse de pouletfrites?"
bharg
India
Local time: 07:31
English translation:See below
Explanation:
Pouletfrite is obviously the name of the site. Normally you would not translate. However it would be a shame for the site to keep the French name and drop the semantic power of that name. If the owner of the site considers an English version of the name, why not "Chickan'fries". The "cuisse" is there to carry the image of "sinking your teeth" into what the site has to offer. English would have a harder time than French with the "thigh", or even a "drumstick" metaphore, where it does accept quite well the teeth sinking one.
My suggestion:
"How about sinking your teeth in Chickan'fries" (or "pouletfrites")
It carries 100% of the meaning.
I chose "in" rather than "into" because the latter would have called for a more countable noun group such as "into a piece of...", and precision would play against the metaphore.

Hope this helps

Hoffwell
Selected response from:

Christian Wellhoff
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for your help. It was very useful and appropriate. Your suggestions are very valid.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naso do you fancy a bite at a chicken and chips? and more afterBono
naare you interested?ashiq mangel
nachicken'n'chipsGrace Kenny
natypo: c'est poulet-fritesAlbert Golub
naDo you feel like a piece of pouletfrites?
Madeleine van Zanten
naSee belowChristian Wellhoff
naWould you care for a fried chicken leg? How'd you like a fried chicken leg?


  

Answers


56 mins
Would you care for a fried chicken leg? How'd you like a fried chicken leg?


Explanation:
Obviously, this is a play on words. The site name "pouletfrites" means "fried chicken" or chicken with fries". The ad is offering advertisers a chance to put their banners or other ads on the site. So, "how'd you like a chicken leg?" is offering a part of the "plate".


Native speaker of:

2 hrs
Do you feel like a piece of pouletfrites?


Explanation:
or:
How about a piece of pouletfrites?

Madeleine van Zanten
Switzerland
Local time: 03:01
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 65
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3 hrs
See below


Explanation:
Pouletfrite is obviously the name of the site. Normally you would not translate. However it would be a shame for the site to keep the French name and drop the semantic power of that name. If the owner of the site considers an English version of the name, why not "Chickan'fries". The "cuisse" is there to carry the image of "sinking your teeth" into what the site has to offer. English would have a harder time than French with the "thigh", or even a "drumstick" metaphore, where it does accept quite well the teeth sinking one.
My suggestion:
"How about sinking your teeth in Chickan'fries" (or "pouletfrites")
It carries 100% of the meaning.
I chose "in" rather than "into" because the latter would have called for a more countable noun group such as "into a piece of...", and precision would play against the metaphore.

Hope this helps

Hoffwell

Christian Wellhoff
PRO pts in pair: 32
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for your help. It was very useful and appropriate. Your suggestions are very valid.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs
typo: c'est poulet-frites


Explanation:
impossible d'accoler les 2 mots sauf pour faire une création
la proposition précédente me parâit bien conserver cet effet "chicken an' fries"


Albert Golub
Local time: 03:01
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in pair: 359
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5 hrs
chicken'n'chips


Explanation:
If your target audience/readership is English (rather than North American), chicken and chips (or the above abbreviation) is the accepted phrase. The common idiomatic expression is "Do you fancy a chicken'n'chips?" (not "some", which would be too correct!).

Grace Kenny

Grace Kenny
Local time: 02:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 11
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6 hrs
so do you fancy a bite at a chicken and chips? and more after


Explanation:
in spoken French this would mean: fancy a chicken and chips? Or what about a chicken and chips?
But in your case they areplaying on the words, between an invitation to a bite and having a share on that site .
So that is why I would tend to use "fancy" and then either "bite" (to keep as close as possible to the original) or "share" to let no-one with any doubts left as to the actual meaning.

Fancy a bite yourself?
Enjoy

Bono
Local time: 03:01
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 142
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6 hrs
are you interested?


Explanation:
I would rather drop the attempt of translating pouletfrite and concentrate on the meaning, because in fact it means are you interested?
So i go for something much simpler in order to avoid confusion. I suggest:
Are you interested?
or
Would you go for it?
or
Let yourself be tempted and click here!
Something of this stuff.
Bon appétit


    own perspicacity
ashiq mangel
Pakistan
Local time: 07:01
PRO pts in pair: 30
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