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gâteau mignon

English translation: Probably !

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01:57 Apr 26, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
French term or phrase: gâteau mignon
Would you leave this in French (a recipe title) or would you translate it into English?
Clair@Lexeme
France
Local time: 11:09
English translation:Probably !
Explanation:
I always find this a difficult decision; I like to deflate the stuffy pretentiousness of French cuisine, or rather, the English tendecny to give pompous French names to simple dishes! What use is a name if it doesn't tell you anything about what a dish consists of?

So if I am translating something to do with fine restaurants, haute cuisine and the like, i tend to leave in French; but if it is a homely cookk-book intended for thee and me, then I usually try to find a translation that makes it seem more approachable --- and why shouldn't an English name be appealing too?! Like fairy cakes, or butterfly sponges, etc.
Mignon is a nice word, so I might leave it anyway!

Good luck!
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:09
Grading comment
Thanks for your help. I've had 7000 words of recipes to translate and I agree with you about using an appropriate English term where possible.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naleave it as it isBono
naProbably !
Tony M
nagateau mignonZoya ayoz
naYes§
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
naLeave it as it is.Jennifer White


  

Answers


9 mins
Leave it as it is.


Explanation:
No satisfactory translation. Sounds OK in French.

Jennifer White
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 145
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30 mins
Yes§


Explanation:
Leave it as is. It is evry common practice to leave French culinary and gastronomic terms as they are. Sounds chic and intrigues. Go for it!



Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 11:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
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31 mins
gateau mignon


Explanation:
You should definitely leave it as it is.
Cook books abound in French titles. They sound tastier :-)

Zoya ayoz
Israel
Local time: 12:09
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
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1 hr
Probably !


Explanation:
I always find this a difficult decision; I like to deflate the stuffy pretentiousness of French cuisine, or rather, the English tendecny to give pompous French names to simple dishes! What use is a name if it doesn't tell you anything about what a dish consists of?

So if I am translating something to do with fine restaurants, haute cuisine and the like, i tend to leave in French; but if it is a homely cookk-book intended for thee and me, then I usually try to find a translation that makes it seem more approachable --- and why shouldn't an English name be appealing too?! Like fairy cakes, or butterfly sponges, etc.
Mignon is a nice word, so I might leave it anyway!

Good luck!

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14157
Grading comment
Thanks for your help. I've had 7000 words of recipes to translate and I agree with you about using an appropriate English term where possible.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
CLS Lexi-tech
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3 hrs
leave it as it is


Explanation:
I agree that it usually sounds pompous when left in French (and I am French,many thanks to the above English caller)but I would nevertheless never change an actual brand name (or almost like one) for a cake. I do call a christmas pudding a christmas pudding in French. A good cook would know what a gateau mignon is anyway.
In haute cuisine the tendency is no longer to putting every thing in French though (that is for the above caller too) but rather to adopt that yes-pompous way the Fench have in giving fancy names to their ordinnary dishes.


    many years of translating for top restaurants in both languages
Bono
Local time: 11:09
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 142
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