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crème fleurette montée

English translation: whipped single cream

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20:24 Jul 10, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
French term or phrase: crème fleurette montée
In a patent relating to the use of cocoa butter as a gelatin substitute in confectionery and catering products; basically a cooking ingredient.

Thanks very much!

Harold
xxxVadney
English translation:whipped single cream
Explanation:
or whipping cream
Good luck!
Ségolène
Selected response from:

chaplin
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:17
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6whipped single cream
chaplin
4 +2whipped light/table creamsuky
4 +1whipped single/whipped table/whipped light creamHelen D. Elliot
5single whipping creamxxxCMJ_Trans
5 -1Just for the record...uparis
4whipped-up single/liquid cream - depending on English
Jean-Luc Dumont
3 -1crème fraîche liquide fouettée
Claudia Iglesias


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
whipped light/table cream


Explanation:
source : Termium

suky
Canada
Local time: 09:17
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter
55 mins
  -> thanks

agree  uparis: That's it. But I suggest just "whipped cream".
2 hrs
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
crème fleurette montée
crème fraîche liquide fouettée


Explanation:
voilà l'explication de ce que c'est. Pour l'anglais je ne peux pas aider. "Fleurette" est l'opposé de "épaisse".

Claudia Iglesias
Chile
Local time: 10:17
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 25

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  uparis: "crème fraîche" is not "crème fleurette" - the first is fermented (sour), the second isn't. See more below.
2 hrs
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
whipped single cream


Explanation:
or whipping cream
Good luck!
Ségolène

chaplin
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:17
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 569
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: As you can't by definition whip single cream, I'd go for simply 'whipped cream'
3 mins

agree  Will Matter: 'whipped cream'
44 mins

agree  margaret caulfield: whipped is right
1 hr

agree  uparis: Yes, "whipped cream"
2 hrs

agree  Jean-Luc Dumont
6 hrs

agree  Ethele Salem Sperling
1 day5 hrs
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53 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
single whipping cream


Explanation:
Like Dusty I thought that single cream could not be whipped until I came across the above (in M&S I seem to remember and you cannot get more basic than that!)

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 15:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5264
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Just for the record...


Explanation:
There was a Kudo recently about "sour cream" used with marinated fish in Sweden. For that one, "sour cream" was finally immortalized as "crème aigre" or maybe "crème acide", despite my valiant attempts to convince people that "sour cream" is "crème fraîche" in France.

So here I go again: if it doesn't have a more or less pronounced sour taste, then it's called "crème fleurette" - and yes, that's what we'd use for whipping cream, which is exactly what they're talking about here. (It's always more or less liquidy - unfortunately nothing in France rivals with "double cream" and all those other wonderful varieties you find in England).

And one more time: "crème fraîche" is NOT what we'd call "fresh cream" or whatever - it's what we'd call "sour cream" !

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-10 23:06:23 (GMT)
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As for the English term here - simply \"whipped cream\" would do it.

uparis
Local time: 15:17
PRO pts in pair: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Helen D. Elliot: by whipped cream, onr would usually understand 35% cream. This cream has much less fat and hence light/table cream (US Canada) or single cream would have to be specified to bring it to the 10% to 20% range
2 days1 hr
  -> I don't know what your sources are - the crème fleurette sold in my neighbourhood is 33-35% cream.
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
whipped-up single/liquid cream - depending on English


Explanation:
the whipped cream

Ingredients
- One litre liquid cream (commonly called crème fleurette)
- 100 gr of sugar (or 150 gr for those who have a sweet tooth)
- Some drops of vanilla extracts



Beat the liquid cream into to whipped cream. Add 1/4 whipped cream to the cooled
coulis and mix well using a whisk until you obtain a homogeneous mixture. ...
www.meilleurduchef.com/cgi/mdc/l/en/ recettes/entremet/framboisier.html - 28k - Cached - Similar pages

Crème fraîche liquide : simplement pasteurisée. On l'appelle aussi "crème fleurette"
ce qui n’a rien de légal mais est joli. Son goût est assez neutre.


To keep whipped up cream in the fridge for up to 2 hours, place cream in
a fine mesh strainer over a cup, loosely cover cream with plastic wrap.. ...
www.pipeline.com/~rosskat/wizzaf.html - 101k - Cached - Similar pages

Goblin Market
... the cows, Aired and set to rights the house, Kneaded cakes of whitest wheat, Cakes
for dainty mouths to eat, Next churned butter, whipped up cream, Fed their ...
www.thecore.nus.edu.sg/landow/victorian/ authors/crossetti/gobmarket.html - 23k - Cached - Similar pages

Proverbs 31 Ministries
... Stuff each half with whipped up cream cheese, then wrap 1/2 slice of bacon around
each half. Bake at 350 or so on a broiling rack until bacon is done. ...
www.gospelcom.net/p31/recipes/stuffed_jalapenos.htm - 14k - Cached - Similar pages


Jean-Luc Dumont
France
Local time: 15:17
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in pair: 1108
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2 days3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
whipped single/whipped table/whipped light cream


Explanation:

depending on the target country.

In Canada we use light cream or table cream meaning cream that has generally has 15% milk fat content.

http://www.xs4all.nl/~margjos/fleurett.htm
FR: crème fleurette 15%
French FR: crème fleurette 15%
- lait condensé (ii)
- crème liquide

English EN: light cream (EN-US)
- table cream (EN-US)
- country cream (15%) (EN-CA)
- single cream (10-20%)

Termium

. Domaine(s)
– Cheese and Dairy Products
Domaine(s)
– Laiterie, beurrerie et fromagerie
table cream Source CORRECT

light cream Source CORRECT crème fleurette Source CORRECT, FÉM OBS – Source: Dictionary of dairy terminology - International Dairy Federation. Source OBS – Source : Dictionary of dairy terminology - International Dairy Federation. Source
1994-03-14

According to Jehane Benoit, it is 15% cream in Canada

1 o - La Nouvelle Encyclopédie De La Cuisine par Madame Jehane Benoit. ...
aujardindelamitie.com/conversion_mesures_metriques.htm - 40k - Cached - Similar pages

Termes
Termes canadiens / américains Termes français
Crème 15% /Crème fleurette ou liquide

Just to add to the confusion, in France it may be heavy whipping cream.

Au Canada, la crème à fouetter contient entre 32 et 40% (généralement 35%) de matières grasses. Aux États-Unis, on distingue la crème à fouetter plus légère (entre 30% et 36% de matières grasses) et la crème à fouetter épaisse (plus de 36% de matières grasses). En Europe, la crème à fouetter est appelée «crème épaisse» et contient au moins 30% de matières grasses.

http://membres.lycos.fr/vpaille/info134.html
La crème de table est plus liquide et contient entre 15 et 18% de matières grasses. En Europe, cette crème se nomme "crème fluide" ou "crème fleurette" et contient entre 30 et 35% de matières grasses.





Helen D. Elliot
Canada
Local time: 09:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 407

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yolanda Broad
1 day3 hrs
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