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(last query!) crumble croustillant à la cardamome

English translation: crispy cardamom crumble topping

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:crumble croustillant à la cardamome
English translation:crispy cardamom crumble topping
Entered by: Marcus Malabad
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00:01 Aug 9, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
French term or phrase: (last query!) crumble croustillant à la cardamome
Ok, this is the last one. My apologies for dominating Kudoz this morning.

Tarte croustillante aux cerises et pistaches (pâte brisée, crème d’amandes à la pistache, cerises griottes, crumble croustillant à la cardamome)

Why all of a sudden there's an English word there (crumble)? Has French borrowed it?

cardamom flaky crust? If that's a crust then is that apart from the pâte brisée mentioned first?
Marcus Malabad
Canada
Local time: 14:37
crispy cardamom crumble topping
Explanation:
I think this is the topping that goes over the cherries. In American English, we say "topping". A "crumble" or a "crisp", is fresh fruit that is sliced, placed in a baking pan and topped with crumble topping: a crumbly mixture of flour, sugar, butter and usually cinammon.
So "rhubarb crisp" is sliced rhubarb with the crumble topping.
In your case, there is a pie crust on the bottom, then the cherries, then the crumble topping.
I think this topping is also sometimes called "streusel topping".
Selected response from:

Alexandra Hague
Local time: 14:37
Grading comment
thanks Alix!
I finally finished the text
btw, it was about the Pierre Herme pastry shop in Paris
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1crisp cardoman crumble topping (here)
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
na +1crispy cardamom crumble topping
Alexandra Hague
na +1crumbleGrace Kenny
nacardamom streusel topping
Alexandra Hague


  

Answers


28 mins peer agreement (net): +1
crumble


Explanation:
It looks like it is a borrowing. But beware, crumble is not like a pastry; it is not homogeneous. It is a mixture of butter, flour and sugar which remains in the form of crumbs, or "crumble".

Grace Kenny
Local time: 13:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY: that is the way the cookie crumbles
8 mins
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1 hr peer agreement (net): +1
crispy cardamom crumble topping


Explanation:
I think this is the topping that goes over the cherries. In American English, we say "topping". A "crumble" or a "crisp", is fresh fruit that is sliced, placed in a baking pan and topped with crumble topping: a crumbly mixture of flour, sugar, butter and usually cinammon.
So "rhubarb crisp" is sliced rhubarb with the crumble topping.
In your case, there is a pie crust on the bottom, then the cherries, then the crumble topping.
I think this topping is also sometimes called "streusel topping".

Alexandra Hague
Local time: 14:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 116
Grading comment
thanks Alix!
I finally finished the text
btw, it was about the Pierre Herme pastry shop in Paris

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne
20 hrs
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1 hr
cardamom streusel topping


Explanation:
OED:
"noun a crumbly topping or filling made from fat, flour, sugar, and often cinnamon."

see above answer

Alexandra Hague
Local time: 14:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 116
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
crisp cardoman crumble topping (here)


Explanation:
This is one of those curiously difficult ones!

In England, an "apple crumble", for example is (generally) stewed apple with crumble topping. The very term crumble refers both to the dish itself AND to the topping. Straight forward crumbles have no pastry underneath.

Your example however sounds like a delicious invention, a hybrid, a crumble pie, a crumble tart. A description follows so your target reader will know what they are eating adn so I think you can be a little creative yourself.

"A crispy cherry and pistachio crumble pie (shortcrust pastry, pistachio almond cream, morello cherries, crispy cardoman topping)."

Crumbles are becoming known in France and there is such a thing as "le crumble". French is full of adopted terms as we all know. Examples :
- "le cookie" (generally referring to hard enormous chocolate chip cookies, altho' cookie, I thought, was just what the English call a biscuits. More often than not, the French refer to bicuits as "gateaux", which for English people are cakes...)
- "le brownie"
- "le pudding" - a soggy cake affair to the French butthe word northern English people use to describe any desert

The "tarte" is often used in my experience as a generic term for a desert which has any sort of crunchy, crumbly, crispy topping on it, pastry case underneath it, or all round it, come to that! I think you have a bit of licence here and that you should use it!



Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 14:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michelle Johnson: I think I have tried it! Bought cold from boulangeries. The "crumble topping" is crunchier than on UK crumbles.
8 hrs
  -> I've tried something similar in our local boulangerie and you're right, the crumble is harder - because thinner?
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