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equipement cintre

English translation: flies apparatus

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07:10 Aug 4, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Other / theatre
French term or phrase: equipement cintre
This is a theatre term, but I cannot find it in commom dictionaries, apart from the term "coat-hanger".
Michel Reis
English translation:flies apparatus
Explanation:
Don't know if you know this source : www.granddictionnaire.com - but it's often a good starting point which you can then check out on the web for original language confirmation.

My searches indicate that the term works in US and British English and that it is valid for cinema as well as theatre.


1 - http://www.granddictionnaire.com/btml/fra/r_motclef/index800...

Domaine(s) : - cinéma studio de cinéma - télévision studio de télévision

Français
cintre n. m. Équivalent(s) English fly


Définition :Partie supérieure du studio, au-dessus des décors.



2 – www.campbroadway.com/res-5.html

The Flies -- This is the area above the stage where scenery is rigged and hung. When scenery lifts off the stage in a scene change, it stays in "the flies" until it's needed again. The rigging system is counterweighted and balanced to keep the heavy scenery safely suspended high in the air.


3 - www.britishtheatreguide.info/ otherresources/glossary/glossdf.htm

FLY : Verb: scenery which is raised into the roof (flown out) or lowered on the stage (flown in). The apparatus for doing this consists of a series of ropes and pulleys in the "fly tower" (a very high roof space) and they raise or lower the scenery by means of a counterweight system or by directly pulling on "hemp lines". The men who operate the "flies" are called "flymen" and the area in which they work is called the "fly floor" of, quite simply, the "flies". People can also be flown (as in every production of Peter Pan) in a harness.




Also : Dictionnaire Cinéma-Audiovisuel-Multimédia-Réseaux, Pessis, George & PESSIS PASTERNAK, Guitta., Ed. DIXIT
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 00:57
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2flies apparatus
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
5Duden says:xxxBourth


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
flies apparatus


Explanation:
Don't know if you know this source : www.granddictionnaire.com - but it's often a good starting point which you can then check out on the web for original language confirmation.

My searches indicate that the term works in US and British English and that it is valid for cinema as well as theatre.


1 - http://www.granddictionnaire.com/btml/fra/r_motclef/index800...

Domaine(s) : - cinéma studio de cinéma - télévision studio de télévision

Français
cintre n. m. Équivalent(s) English fly


Définition :Partie supérieure du studio, au-dessus des décors.



2 – www.campbroadway.com/res-5.html

The Flies -- This is the area above the stage where scenery is rigged and hung. When scenery lifts off the stage in a scene change, it stays in "the flies" until it's needed again. The rigging system is counterweighted and balanced to keep the heavy scenery safely suspended high in the air.


3 - www.britishtheatreguide.info/ otherresources/glossary/glossdf.htm

FLY : Verb: scenery which is raised into the roof (flown out) or lowered on the stage (flown in). The apparatus for doing this consists of a series of ropes and pulleys in the "fly tower" (a very high roof space) and they raise or lower the scenery by means of a counterweight system or by directly pulling on "hemp lines". The men who operate the "flies" are called "flymen" and the area in which they work is called the "fly floor" of, quite simply, the "flies". People can also be flown (as in every production of Peter Pan) in a harness.




Also : Dictionnaire Cinéma-Audiovisuel-Multimédia-Réseaux, Pessis, George & PESSIS PASTERNAK, Guitta., Ed. DIXIT



    Reference: http://www.campbroadway.com/res-5.html
    www.britishtheatreguide.info/ otherresources/glossary/glossdf.htm
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 00:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
37 mins

agree  xxxBourth: Confirmed by Oxford-Duden Pictorial
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Duden says:


Explanation:
<<la cage de scène avec la machinerie des cintres et des dessous = stagehouse with machinery (machinery in the flies and below stage)>>

<<brigadier des cintres = fly man>>

xxxBourth
Local time: 00:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 328
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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