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tanta va la cruche a l'eau qu'a la fin elle se casse

English translation: The pitcher that goes oftenest to the well is the soonest broken

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15:51 Aug 24, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
French term or phrase: tanta va la cruche a l'eau qu'a la fin elle se casse
This is a French proverb which I have not been able to find an English equivalent for.
apancake
United States
Local time: 20:16
English translation:The pitcher that goes oftenest to the well is the soonest broken
Explanation:
Proverb, meaning that eventually the law of averages catches up. The more frequently a risk is run, the quicker disater occurs. This is the traditional English version.
Selected response from:

Peter Freckleton
Australia
Local time: 12:16
Grading comment
Thanks!
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +6don't push your luck
Angela Arnone
na +2No matter how often a pitcher goes to the water it is broken in the end
CLS Lexi-tech
na +1If you keep playing with fire, you must expect to get burnt
Poornima Iyengar
naThe pitcher went once too often to the well.Pattie Kealy
naThe pitcher will go to the well once too often.xxxJon Zuber
naThe pitcher that goes oftenest to the well is the soonest broken
Peter Freckleton
naEnough is enough.
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
na -1(he) went to the well one time too many/once too often
Guy Bray


  

Answers


5 mins peer agreement (net): -1
(he) went to the well one time too many/once too often


Explanation:
(or words to that effect): more a saying than a proverb

Guy Bray
United States
Local time: 17:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 819

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  BOB DE DENUS: Guy's interpretation is more in context than Amgela's as it remains aqueous and proverbial
3 hrs

disagree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Too literal by far
7 hrs

disagree  Angela Arnone: just curious about who "he" is?
14 hrs
  -> (or she)
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12 mins peer agreement (net): +6
don't push your luck


Explanation:
Literally "if you dip the old jug into the well too often it will crack"
Basically it means "don't push your luck".
The Italian version is identical "tanto va la brocca alla fontana che alla fine si rompe"

There is also a reference to equivalent versions in other languages in: http://www.aatranslations.com/italiano/workshop/proverbs.htm...

Angela


Angela Arnone
Local time: 02:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jenniclair
3 mins

agree  Anna Beria: IT: Tanto va la gatta al lardo che ci lascia lo zampino
56 mins

agree  Kateabc
2 hrs

agree  Albert Golub: rien à redire, très complet
6 hrs

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Much more like it, perhaps too colloquial for some contexts though.
6 hrs

agree  Bertha S. Deffenbaugh: ESP: Tanto va el cántaro al agua que termina por romperse.
1 day 30 mins
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7 hrs
Enough is enough.


Explanation:
Angela's "Don't push your luck" is absolutely right although it might just be too contemporary a saying for some contexts.

http://french.about.com/library/express/blex_proverb.htm

English : Enough is enough.

French : Tant va la cruche à l'eau qu'à la fin elle se casse.

Literal : So often the pitcher goes to the water that in the end it breaks.


http://www.shu.ac.uk/cgi-bin/tp_post2.cgi?w=proverb


http://perso.club-internet.fr/degomix/english/proverbes.html

"Tant va la cruche à l'eau qu'à la fin elle se casse (ou qu'enfin elle se brise)."

Meanings :
- tout finit par s'user
- à force de braver un danger, on finit par y succomber
- à force de faire la même faute, on finit par en pâtir.




Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 02:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  dovo
1 hr

disagree  Bertha S. Deffenbaugh: Peter Freckeleton's is the right one.
17 hrs
  -> Perhaps, but for British English audience, the comments I made remain valid
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10 hrs
The pitcher that goes oftenest to the well is the soonest broken


Explanation:
Proverb, meaning that eventually the law of averages catches up. The more frequently a risk is run, the quicker disater occurs. This is the traditional English version.

Peter Freckleton
Australia
Local time: 12:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 722
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: oftenist? (pmost often) ; soonest? (first) ; quicker? (here 'sooner') - GB for English anyway!
3 hrs

agree  Bertha S. Deffenbaugh: Good one, Peter. Pity not everyone can appreciate it. :(
14 hrs
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11 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
No matter how often a pitcher goes to the water it is broken in the end


Explanation:
As an Irish proverb, found in many sites including
http://www.irishabroad.com/Culture/Proverbs/
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bj333/HomePage.proverbs.html

Also found as a Sicilian proverb
ciacca
Tantu va la quartara all'acqua, fina chi si rumpi o si ciacca.
Eng. No matter how often a pitcher goes to the water, it is broken in the end.

In a paper on European proverbs:
The pitcher goes so long to the well, until it breaks.
http://www.mek.iif.hu/porta/szint/tarsad/nyelvtud/european/e...

Romanian
Ulciorul nu merge de multe ori la apã.
The pitcher goes so often to the well, that is comes home broken at last.
The put goes so long to the water that it is broken at last

This was a very interesting research

regards

paola l m


CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 20:16
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 162

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  VBaby
1 hr

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: ... it breaks in the end / it gets borken in the end / it will break in the end
1 day 14 hrs
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13 hrs
The pitcher will go to the well once too often.


Explanation:
or whatever version you like best. This one is from the Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs.

xxxJon Zuber
PRO pts in pair: 24
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18 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
If you keep playing with fire, you must expect to get burnt


Explanation:
This is what I found in my Collins Robert dictionary.
HTH
-Poornima

Just one more to add to the list of interpretations given above.

Poornima Iyengar
Local time: 06:46
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 174

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  CLS Lexi-tech: very interesting, thanks. the beauty of proverbs is that they say something w/out actually saying it!
1 day 9 hrs
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19 hrs
The pitcher went once too often to the well.


Explanation:
From "Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable": "The dodge wast ried once too often and utterly failed. The sentiment is proverbial in most European languages."


    Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 15th edition, HarperCollins
Pattie Kealy
Local time: 17:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 6
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