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petits cochons, mousquetaires, Nif-Nif, Nouf-Nouf, etc.

English translation: The Three Little Pigs and the Three Musketeers

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13:23 Aug 8, 2000
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: petits cochons, mousquetaires, Nif-Nif, Nouf-Nouf, etc.
This is an example from an article on numbers, intended to illustrate sets and one-to-one correspondence. The whole reference is: "Par exemple, il y a autant de petits cochons que de mousquetaires car on peut associer:
- Nif-Nif avec Porthos,
- Nouf-Nouf avec Athos,
- Naf-Naf avec Aramis."
I get the idea that this is a children's rhyme on the order of "This little piggy went to market." Can someone please give me the whole rhyme (or whatever) and explain it to me? Thanks a lot.
Ronda
Ronda Cunningham
United States
Local time: 02:12
English translation:The Three Little Pigs and the Three Musketeers
Explanation:
You're exactly right:

"For example, there are as many little pigs as there are musketeers, because we can associate:
- Nif-Nif with Porthos,
- Nouf-Nouf with Athos, [and]
- Naf-Naf with Aramis."

The three little pigs are the traditional ones in the children's story, which is mentioned (at the first web site below) thus: "Les trois petits cochons: Il y avait une fois trois petits cochons qui s'appelaient: Nif-Nif, Naf-Naf et Nouf-Nouf ..."

The story is retold in full, in the conventional way, at the second web site. As you may recall, the three little pigs decided to build their houses of straw, wood, and brick, respectively, and only the last house withstood the depredations of the Big Bad Wolf.

However, the story is given a cheerful twist at the following sites:

1) www.ac-amiens.fr/lep60/laforet_chantilly/contespc.htm ("contes réecrits en politiquement correct") and
2) www.citeweb.net/gemini/les_3_petits_cochons.htm

with the wolf ending by "renouncing his gastronomic ambitions..."
Selected response from:

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 01:12
Grading comment
Thanks! Your answer was complete, and your references were great.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nathe three little pigs, the three musketeers,
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
naThe Three Little Pigs and the Three MusketeersHeathcliff
nathe Three Little Pigs and the Three MusketeersRonda Cunningham
nasee belowTelesforo Fernandez


  

Answers


14 mins
see below


Explanation:
You may be able to get some idea from the site given below.


    Reference: http://www.respublica.fr/luciengenin/ddb/char.txt
Telesforo Fernandez
Local time: 13:42
PRO pts in pair: 216

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
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42 mins
the Three Little Pigs and the Three Musketeers


Explanation:
After thinking about it the answer became obvious; Porthos, Athos, and Aramis are the names of the Three Musketeers. And I suppose that in the story of the three pigs, they are named Nif-Nif, Nouf-Nouf, and Naf-Naf in French, although they are usually nameless in English. Can anyone confirm that for me? Thanks.

Ronda Cunningham
United States
Local time: 02:12
PRO pts in pair: 3

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
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1 hr
The Three Little Pigs and the Three Musketeers


Explanation:
You're exactly right:

"For example, there are as many little pigs as there are musketeers, because we can associate:
- Nif-Nif with Porthos,
- Nouf-Nouf with Athos, [and]
- Naf-Naf with Aramis."

The three little pigs are the traditional ones in the children's story, which is mentioned (at the first web site below) thus: "Les trois petits cochons: Il y avait une fois trois petits cochons qui s'appelaient: Nif-Nif, Naf-Naf et Nouf-Nouf ..."

The story is retold in full, in the conventional way, at the second web site. As you may recall, the three little pigs decided to build their houses of straw, wood, and brick, respectively, and only the last house withstood the depredations of the Big Bad Wolf.

However, the story is given a cheerful twist at the following sites:

1) www.ac-amiens.fr/lep60/laforet_chantilly/contespc.htm ("contes réecrits en politiquement correct") and
2) www.citeweb.net/gemini/les_3_petits_cochons.htm

with the wolf ending by "renouncing his gastronomic ambitions..."



    trc2.ucdavis.edu/french/24.html
    Reference: http://www.cc-pays-de-gex.fr/edres01/ecoles/ecsgplio/travaux...
Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 01:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 953
Grading comment
Thanks! Your answer was complete, and your references were great.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Moli?re
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11 hrs
the three little pigs, the three musketeers,


Explanation:
To confirmprevious two entries. I read these stories to my children in English. They also have them in French. I discovered that the pigs had names in the French version, whereas in the English version they are referred to as the first little pig, the second little piag and so on... (Hence the trotter imprint for the clothes made by Naf-Naf!)

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 10:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4416

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
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