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une Schadenfreude

English translation: Schadefreude

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06:19 Oct 19, 2001
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: une Schadenfreude
.. une Schadenfreude que le monde musulman a ressenti devant l\'écroulement des Twin Towers.

A German word in a French sentence. What does it mean.
Sita
English translation:Schadefreude
Explanation:
Commonly used in English also -pleasure at their misfortune
Selected response from:

mckinnc
Local time: 08:09
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4Schadefreudemckinnc
4 +3you should leave it in German, because...
CLS Lexi-tech
4 +2schadenfreude
Mary Worby
4 +1... perverse pleasure ...
Parrot
4malicious gleexxxAbu Amaal
2Schadenfreude - here in a French sentence, though more often found in the same way in English, too.
Jacqui s


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Schadefreude


Explanation:
Commonly used in English also -pleasure at their misfortune

mckinnc
Local time: 08:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 922

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maya Jurt
36 mins

agree  Sheila Hardie
59 mins

agree  xxxninasc
2 hrs

agree  athena22
5 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
schadenfreude


Explanation:
Schaden means pain and Freude is pleasure, so schadenfreude means pleasure at someone else's pain. You can leave it as it English, or paraphrase it into 'malicious pleasure' if you're happier with that.

HTH

Maru

Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 484

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  VBaby
12 mins

agree  aggeliki: malicious pleasure
1 hr
  -> Now if only I could spell my name right, I'd have cracked it! (-:
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
you should leave it in German, because...


Explanation:
because the term is a reference to a concept expressed by Kafka, Freud and Nietzche and others.
I found this interesting site which explains the term, with reference to a current book in English "When Bad Things Happen to Good People"

The title of Portmann's clever and insightful book is a play upon "When Bad Things Happen to Good People," the 1981 bestseller that sought to find, in the most brutal of personal tragedies, evidence that God is compassionate in spite of it all. Portmann's work seeks to defend not God, but spiteful humanity: "Schadenfreude," he writes, "Represents one form of solace in a pain-filled existence," while it remains interior. Don't beat yourself up about it if you giggle when Mikey falls down the stairs; just don't push him.

Portmann is a philosopher, and his book erects the same hurdles to the layperson that any philosophy book does; though the topics are as universal in import as Plato's or Kierkegaard's, his writing can also be as difficult to read. Philosophical writing can appear, to those of us untrained in its careful nature, overly and unnecessarily complicated—when Portmann spends the first ten pages of his treatise on the precise definition and derivation of the word "schadenfreude," it is because such careful articulation is necessary to a sound philosophical argument; but the rest of us might be wishing that something bad would happen to him by the time he gets from the OED to Kafka and back.

But "When Bad Things" is worth sticking with, as it treads bravely in a section of the emotional swamp that is rarely visited. And Portmann—who cites with great intelligence not only Kafka, Freud and Nietzsche (whose sublime ravings are always a hoot), but also non-philosophers like Toni Morrison—is capable of an affecting profundity. The important thing to remember, after all, is that "we are ourselves the good things that happen to some people, and the bad things that happen to other people."




    Reference: http://www.newcitychicago.com/chicago/words-1999-12-30-25.ht...
CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 02:09
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 162

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maya Jurt
2 mins

agree  Sheila Hardie
46 mins

agree  athena22
5 hrs
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40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Schadenfreude - here in a French sentence, though more often found in the same way in English, too.


Explanation:
A word used in German philosophy, from 2 compounds, Schade - pain, Freude - pleasure and joy, so it means pleasure at another's misfortunes ... a bit like Sturm und Drang with stress, and a few other similar words and expressions.

Jacqui s
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
malicious glee


Explanation:
I don't feel that the phrase is readily recognized in English. And there is a ready equivalent.

btw ... the proverb says "Die beste Freude ist eine Schadenfreude",
which I've heard rendered as:
"The best joke is one at someone else's expense."

In any case, just another thought ...

xxxAbu Amaal
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 51
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
... perverse pleasure ...


Explanation:
2 cents worth in common English. While I'd love to say, leave it in German, I think it would be easier to identify with this since, even when one believes that we are talking about an endless litany of injustice on both sides, we have to admit that whatever pleasure felt can only be perverse, since it harms us as well (SM?)

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 08:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1861

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yolanda Broad
22 hrs
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