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démesure

English translation: immoderation

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:démesure
English translation:immoderation
Entered by: Rimas Balsys
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

00:26 Nov 12, 2008
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Marketing - Philosophy
French term or phrase: démesure
This is actually a financial commentary urging that we not view the current economic crisis as the end of the world. The sentence is "Ce n’est donc pas la fin du monde, l’hubris que décrit Aristote, **la démesure**, le franchissement des limites raisonnables ne va pas détruire le système capitaliste..."
I have a possiblity somewhere on the tip of my tongue but would greatly appreciate any ideas :-)
Rimas Balsys
Local time: 15:38
immoderation
Explanation:
I wonder if you think this would do?

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Note added at 11 mins (2008-11-12 00:38:00 GMT)
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Moderation would seem to be a more private pursuit, but Aristotle's paradigm of immoderation is a king, and "many people in positions of power (exousiais) feel the same way as Sardanapallus" (I.4.1195b21-22; Irwin trans.). Since those who exercise political authority are most able to gratify their desires for pleasure, they exercise the greatest degree of moderation in choosing not to do so. Among the so-called social virtues of book IV, magnanimity and proper pride are realized by attaining some suitable position of superiority, and though he does not quite say so, Aristotle surely has in mind positions of political leadership. In short, Aristotle clearly thinks the paradigmatic exercises of courage and justice are in political activities and hints, at least, that the greatest exercise of moderation as well as the exercise of magnanimity and proper pride also occur in the exercise of political power.
http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Anci/AnciHal2.htm

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=x9BXxPsfLA0C&pg=PA139&lpg...

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Note added at 5 days (2008-11-17 13:58:29 GMT) Post-grading
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Thank you for the points, Rimas
Selected response from:

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:38
Grading comment
Although 'excesses' is perhaps more natural current English, I've gone for 'immoderation' as it's more evocative of the accepted English for things Aristotelian. Thanks to all!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2excessNicole Pennebaker
3 +1immoderation
Helen Shiner
4overabundanceMatthewLaSon


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
excess


Explanation:
I'm sure there are other ways to phrase it too.

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Note added at 7 mins (2008-11-12 00:33:49 GMT)
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or maybe "excessiveness"

Nicole Pennebaker
United States
Local time: 16:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kelly L'Archevêque: Excess hits it right on traget.
1 hr
  -> Thanks Kelly!

agree  EJP
9 hrs
  -> Thanks EJP!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
overabundance


Explanation:
Hello,

I think this is the word you're after.

démesure (here) = overabundance

I hope this helps.

MatthewLaSon
Local time: 18:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
immoderation


Explanation:
I wonder if you think this would do?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2008-11-12 00:38:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Moderation would seem to be a more private pursuit, but Aristotle's paradigm of immoderation is a king, and "many people in positions of power (exousiais) feel the same way as Sardanapallus" (I.4.1195b21-22; Irwin trans.). Since those who exercise political authority are most able to gratify their desires for pleasure, they exercise the greatest degree of moderation in choosing not to do so. Among the so-called social virtues of book IV, magnanimity and proper pride are realized by attaining some suitable position of superiority, and though he does not quite say so, Aristotle surely has in mind positions of political leadership. In short, Aristotle clearly thinks the paradigmatic exercises of courage and justice are in political activities and hints, at least, that the greatest exercise of moderation as well as the exercise of magnanimity and proper pride also occur in the exercise of political power.
http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Anci/AnciHal2.htm

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=x9BXxPsfLA0C&pg=PA139&lpg...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 days (2008-11-17 13:58:29 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thank you for the points, Rimas

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:38
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Although 'excesses' is perhaps more natural current English, I've gone for 'immoderation' as it's more evocative of the accepted English for things Aristotelian. Thanks to all!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cath St Clair
16 mins
  -> Thank you, Cath
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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