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retour en équerre

English translation: right-angled leg

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:retour en équerre
English translation:right-angled leg
Entered by: Barbara Cochran, MFA
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13:33 Mar 16, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / Description Of The Piazzetta
French term or phrase: retour en équerre
Description of 18th century painter Canaletto's favorite walk.

"Durant les longues haltes de Canaletto aux alentours de Saint-Marc, sa promenade favorite fut encore la Piazzetta, ce **retour en équerre** que la grande place forme devant la basilique.

Mille Mercis!

femme
Barbara Cochran, MFA
United States
Local time: 02:36
right-angled leg/limb
Explanation:
If St Mark's Square is the bit between the basilica and the canal, then the Piazzetta is the bit "inland", parallel to the canal, that runs off to the left of the square as you stand with the canal behind you.

GoogleEarth will show you.
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 08:36
Grading comment
Merci!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1right-angled leg/limbxxxBourth
4 +1extension at right-angles
Tony M
4the little square around the corner of the Basilica
Mary Carroll Richer LaFlèche
3two faces at right anglexxxgiltal
3 -1orthogon
fourth


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
right-angled leg/limb


Explanation:
If St Mark's Square is the bit between the basilica and the canal, then the Piazzetta is the bit "inland", parallel to the canal, that runs off to the left of the square as you stand with the canal behind you.

GoogleEarth will show you.

xxxBourth
Local time: 08:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 110
Grading comment
Merci!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  cjohnstone
1 hr

neutral  Tony M: I think it's actually the other way round, Alex: St Mark's Square is the big bit, and the Piazzetta is the bit that extends the Square southwards down to the lagoon, past the Campanile and Doge's Palace
1 hr
  -> I was in some doubt on that. Some Web sources suggested it was as I phrased it, but I'm not necess. convinced. Though in my mind the square at the side (?) of the basilica, that runs down to the canal, is the "main" square. Haven't been to V. since 1982
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
two faces at right angle


Explanation:
I'm not sure about my translation. I will give you the definition I found, you can probably come up with something better."Retour en équerre− Rare. [En parlant d'un bâtiment] En retour d'équerre, revenant en équerre. Qui a deux faces formant un angle droit. Un grand corps de logis et deux ailes revenant en équerre, de façon à former une cour d'honneur (Gautier, Fracasse, 1863, p. 88). Là, le bâtiment faisait un retour d'équerre et l'on débouchait dans une longue galerie (Gautier, Fracasse, 1863 p. 380)."

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Note added at 3 hrs (2008-03-16 16:57:29 GMT)
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If you go on the link, you have to type "équerre", then choose "trésor", then for some reason you have to choose the term "équerre".


    Reference: http://www.lexilogos.com/francais_langue_dictionnaires.htm
xxxgiltal
Local time: 03:36
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
orthogon


Explanation:
Lit.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2008-03-16 17:51:00 GMT)
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I've never seen it used. Ever. Although it dates back to 16th century. Some suggestion it may be vertical and not horizontal? Thoughts?

fourth
France
Local time: 08:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Wouldn't make any sense at all in the given context / No, but it's just not what they're talking about; have you actually been there to see it?
6 mins
  -> Why's that Tony, no right angles?

neutral  xxxgiltal: what about orthogonal ?
7 mins
  -> Yes. I think a noun is being requested
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
the little square around the corner of the Basilica


Explanation:
offshoot of Piazza San Marco


    Reference: http://www.igougo.com/attractions-reviews-b61681-Venice-Piaz...
Mary Carroll Richer LaFlèche
Canada
Local time: 02:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Not strictly accurate, Mary. It isn't really 'round the corner of the basilica', and it's a pretty BIG square, actually!
38 mins
  -> it's little in comparison to the Piazza,that's why it ends with 'etta' (diminutive.Having the same name,one is larger than the other,so Piazza and Piazzetta.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
extension at right-angles


Explanation:
or 'short leg of the L-shaped...'

This Wiki article tells you exactly which part it is; the short leg of the L-shaped St Mark's Square, extending southwards to the lagoon, between the Campanile and the Doge's Palace

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Note added at 9 hrs (2008-03-16 22:33:54 GMT)
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Alex, the basilica really and truly opens onto the main piazza; it is more the Doges' Palace that opens literally onto the Piazzetta — if you regard this as ONLY the 'add-on' bit

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Note added at 9 hrs (2008-03-16 22:35:48 GMT)
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See the images in the Wiki article:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mark's_Square

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 128

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: Or even "the (open) square that leads to the lagoon"/Above all (?) it's the one opposite the entrance to the basilica, if I remember right (?)
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Alex! Yes, that would work too. A quick look on Google maps show that the main piazza is indeed the bigger (slightly)
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Changes made by editors
Mar 17, 2008 - Changes made by Barbara Cochran, MFA:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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