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s’immisçant de pétales en feuillages

English translation: insinuating itself between the petals and leaves

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:s’immisçant de pétales en feuillages
English translation:insinuating itself between the petals and leaves
Entered by: Carol Gullidge
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

14:30 Dec 7, 2010
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / flowery description of scenery
French term or phrase: s’immisçant de pétales en feuillages
Sorry to be boring and repetitive, but this does save potential helpers from having to refer back to previous questions for the context
__________________________________

Tout a commencé pour l’auteur en ce 16 juin 2006. L’orage menaçait sur Gréoux-les-bains, une charmante cité thermale aux tuiles plates et orangées, enclavée dans son écrin de verdure provençal à quelques encablures de Manosque.

Cette terre chaude et rustique, embaumée des suavités les plus subtiles, s’alanguissait au souffle impérieux d’Eole ******s’immisçant de pétales en feuillages****** et de montagnes en vallées.

_________________

The very beginning of a lengthy foreword to a novel. Any help with actually deciphering this would be much appreciated as I'm more concerned about finding the correct meaning than about a wonderfully-crafted ready-made answer - which I'd be quite happy to concoct myself once I knew what is actually being said! Not that beautiful turns of phrase ever go amiss on KudoZ, and they are a wonderful resource for the Glossary...

PS, in case it's not obvious, the register here is fairly high/literary

Many thanks in advance for any suggestions!
Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:27
insinuating itself into the petals and leaves
Explanation:
Though s’immiscer would usually be to interfere or to get too involved with, that is clearly not quite the right meaning here.

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Note added at 1 hr (2010-12-07 15:47:17 GMT)
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One could even add "very":
"insinuating itself into the very petals and leaves".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2010-12-07 16:08:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The subject of s'immiscer is "le souffle impérieux d’Eole".
Selected response from:

B D Finch
France
Local time: 06:27
Grading comment
thanks to BD and everyone, especially for the explanations, which were most helpful! I shan't be editing/proofreading this text until the whole of the first draft is completed - some time next month, so there's a chance this may be modified very slightly, in which case, I'll duly amend the Glossary entry if need be. Meanwhile, it's the meaning that's really important, and which I'm really grateful to you for supplying - along with your lovely renditions!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4insinuating itself into the petals and leaves
B D Finch
4 +1fluttering amongst the blossoms and foliagecc in nyc
2urging/pushing its way through petals and leaves
Rachel Fell


Discussion entries: 12





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
insinuating itself into the petals and leaves


Explanation:
Though s’immiscer would usually be to interfere or to get too involved with, that is clearly not quite the right meaning here.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2010-12-07 15:47:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

One could even add "very":
"insinuating itself into the very petals and leaves".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2010-12-07 16:08:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The subject of s'immiscer is "le souffle impérieux d’Eole".

B D Finch
France
Local time: 06:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 39
Grading comment
thanks to BD and everyone, especially for the explanations, which were most helpful! I shan't be editing/proofreading this text until the whole of the first draft is completed - some time next month, so there's a chance this may be modified very slightly, in which case, I'll duly amend the Glossary entry if need be. Meanwhile, it's the meaning that's really important, and which I'm really grateful to you for supplying - along with your lovely renditions!
Notes to answerer
Asker: thanks BD! I had in fact worked out the subject/verb relationship, but was nevertheless stumped re the meaning of "s'immiscer". I like "insinuating..." - one that hadn't occurred to me!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sandra Mouton: Thanks for your comment about "wriggling" but I think "insinuating" is better here
37 mins
  -> Thanks Sandra. I didn't think that "wriggling" would work as an answer, but it is useful as explanation.

agree  Veronica Coquard: I like "insinuating itself into the very petals and leaves". Nice one!
47 mins
  -> Thanks versanglais

agree  cc in nyc: It's not that I don't like my own entry, but I also like yours. (Not so enthusiastic though about "the very"; leaves and trees are where we usually see the wind.)
54 mins
  -> Thanks cc. The suggestion of "very" was to emphasise the imagery of entering into, becoming part of, rather than just blowing over.

agree  xxxSMcG: spot on at keeping at keeping it tad high-brow: insinuating as in sliding slowly and smoothly into a position
3 hrs
  -> Thanks
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
fluttering amongst the blossoms and foliage


Explanation:
I steered away from "swirling" because of "s'alanguir.

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Note added at 1 hr (2010-12-07 16:17:38 GMT)
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At least I would not be languid or languorous if the wind were swirling about me.

BTW, I posted the wiki mostly because I liked the picture. (Of course it has some information as well, and can be toggled to the English wiki, which differs from the French one.)


    Reference: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eole
cc in nyc
Local time: 00:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
Notes to answerer
Asker: thanks cc! Good point re "s'alanguir"!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philippe vandevivere: really beautiful, so is 'swirling', you're a poet
49 mins
  -> Thank you! We do what we can with our poor tools.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
urging/pushing its way through petals and leaves


Explanation:
suggestion -

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Note added at 6 hrs (2010-12-07 20:50:43 GMT)
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or, if using "Aeolus", then "his way"- and maybe flowers rather than petals, if you have any idea what plants are around.

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: many thanks Rachel - this is nice too!

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Changes made by editors
Dec 8, 2010 - Changes made by Stéphanie Soudais:
Field (specific)Other » Poetry & Literature


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