KudoZ home » French to English » Psychology

habitacle et habitant

English translation: habitation and inhabitant/ compartment and passenger

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
08:21 Nov 18, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Psychology / Psychology
French term or phrase: habitacle et habitant
Le concept de rencontre entre habitacle et habitant développé par Ajuriaguerra, peut permettre de décrire une évolution développementale chez l'enfant de la relation entre douleur, corps, emotion et pensées.
Amanda Grey
France
Local time: 19:03
English translation:habitation and inhabitant/ compartment and passenger
Explanation:
This seems like a Lacanian usage, "habitacle" amounting to "container" in this case.

This seems to be the sort of jargon used in that circle and best quoted in French with English equivalents supplied. There is an element of wordplay here, trivial but still to be retained.

The meaning is more or less compartment and passenger. "habitation" is not very literal but the usage is a metaphor to begin with.

I'd prefer a pair that does both jobs - haven't found it.


Selected response from:

xxxAbu Amaal
Grading comment
Thanks everyone
1 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +1habitation and inhabitant/ compartment and passengerxxxAbu Amaal
4 +1dwelling place/ abode - occupant
Maya Jurt
4between dwelling place/binnacle and dweller
Evert DELOOF-SYS


  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
between dwelling place/binnacle and dweller


Explanation:
would suit rather nicely here.

Ref.:

Hab"it*a*cle (hăb"&ibreve_;t*&adot_;*k'l), n. [F. habitacle dwelling place, binnacle, L. habitaculum dwelling place. See Binnacle, Habit, v.] A dwelling place. Chaucer. Southey.

> [1913 Webster]


Ha`bi`tan" (&adot_;`b&euptack_;;`tä&nsmallcapp_;"), n. Same as Habitant, 2.

> [1913 Webster]


“General Arnold met an emissary . . . sent . . . to ascertain the feelings of the habitans or French yeomanry.”” W. Irwing.

> [1913 Webster]


Hab"it*ance (hăb"&ibreve_;t*&aitalic_;;ns), n. [OF. habitance, LL. habitantia.] Dwelling; abode; residence. [Obs.] Spenser.

> [1913 Webster]


Hab"it*an*cy (hăb"&ibreve_;t*&aitalic_;;n*s&ybreve_;), n. Same as Inhabitancy.

> [1913 Webster]


Hab"it*ant (hăb"&ibreve_;t*&aitalic_;;nt), n. [F. habitant. See Habit, v. t.]

> [1913 Webster]


1. An inhabitant; a dweller. Milton. Pope.

> [1913 Webster]


2. [F. pron. &adot_;`b&euptack_;;`tä&nsmallcapp_;"] An inhabitant or resident; -- a name applied to and denoting farmers of French descent or origin in Canada, especially in the Province of Quebec; -- usually in the plural.

> [1913 Webster]


“The habitants or cultivators of the soil.”” Parkman.

> [1913 Webster]


Hab"i*tat (hăb"&ibreve_;*tăt), n. [L., it dwells, fr. habitare. See Habit, v. t.] 1. (Biol.) The natural abode, locality or region of an animal or plant.

HTH



Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 19:03
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
dwelling place/ abode - occupant


Explanation:
Juan de Ajuriaguerra is a well known figure in psychology and psychiatry.
See the link below, it may help you with your translation. I should appear in the English version.

The sentence

The concept of the occupant's encounter with his abode, as developped by Ajuriaguerra, permits to describe a developmental evolution between pain, body, emotion and thought, occuring to the child.

That is the way I understand it.

HTH


    Reference: http://www.psychomedia.it/apr/index2.htm
Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 19:03
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxAbu Amaal: works. I'd play more with "permits" and "evolution", but those are details.
11 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
habitation and inhabitant/ compartment and passenger


Explanation:
This seems like a Lacanian usage, "habitacle" amounting to "container" in this case.

This seems to be the sort of jargon used in that circle and best quoted in French with English equivalents supplied. There is an element of wordplay here, trivial but still to be retained.

The meaning is more or less compartment and passenger. "habitation" is not very literal but the usage is a metaphor to begin with.

I'd prefer a pair that does both jobs - haven't found it.




xxxAbu Amaal
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Thanks everyone

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maya Jurt: Don't forget, this is Ajuriaguerra talking.
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search