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uniciste

English translation: monist

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:uniciste
English translation:monist
Entered by: Andy Tolle
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13:24 Nov 26, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Science - Psychology
French term or phrase: uniciste
As in: opposite of "dualistic"

Est-ce une théorie uniciste ? Oui, puisqu'elle admet la continuité entre la pensée et la matière, par la transmutation de l'une dans l'autre.

I currently translated it as "unifying theory", but I'd like to hear you take on it, cause I can't seem to find any reference that backs this up.
Andy Tolle
Belgium
Local time: 05:12
monist
Explanation:
Monism is any philosophical view which holds that there is unity in a given field of inquiry, where this is not to be expected. Thus, some philosophers may hold that the Universe is really just one thing, despite its many appearances and diversities: or theology may support the view that there is one God, with many manifestations in different religions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monism

Please consult this article in full as it describes many different forms of monism and I presume you will need to be precise.

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Note added at 26 mins (2008-11-26 13:51:10 GMT)
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Monism is a philosophical term deriving from the Greek "monos," meaning "one," "alone," or "unique." Monism opposes to Dualism and Pluralism in its denial that the appearance of a multiplicity of different phenomena are really aspects of an underlying whole or unity. Ancient Hindu philosophers considered the world of our sensory experience to be illusion [maya], and early Greek philosophers agreed that sensory knowledge is untrustworthy for determining the true nature of things.

Epistemological Monism in its classical form is known as Absolutism. It states that both subject and object are mere apects of a single abstract, unlimited consciousness - or state of being - termed "The Absolute," and is used in describing absolutist forms of monotheism, panpsychism and even reductive materialism (all things that exist are reducible to matter/energy).

Monism is consistent with the universal quality of mysticism, in that it affirms the all-embracing sense of "one-ness" or unity in the experience of mystical states [a.k.a. euphoric vision]. This apprehension of a fundamental unity of being has been reported throughout recorded history by mystics representing the full range of cultural religious/philosophical traditions.
http://www.iscid.org/encyclopedia/Monism

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Note added at 44 mins (2008-11-26 14:08:18 GMT)
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It could well be that in your particular context, 'unifying' would be more appropriate, but it is difficult for us to judge.

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Note added at 8 hrs (2008-11-26 21:35:31 GMT)
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In light of what you have provided as extra context, my sources and the one liz has appended to her agree, I do think it appropriate to use 'monist', since it is not used in an individualised manner, particular only to one theory. I hope this helps.

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Note added at 8 hrs (2008-11-26 21:37:12 GMT)
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Also, 'unifying' is about bringing things together, whereas 'monist' is about considering them as one.

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Note added at 9 hrs (2008-11-26 23:15:29 GMT)
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My comment was based on the sentence you gave originally. If the author believes in a continuity between things then in one key sense they are indivisible; thus 'monist' is appropriate. I suppose you will have to determine whether that is what you are looking for. If things, for him, were completely distinct and he was concerned with finding a way to bring them together then that would be 'unifying'. To use your instance of North and South Poles: he would have to make one pole out of both of them to be unifying. Monism is believing a common thread runs through all things, that everything is of the Maker, for instance.

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Note added at 5 days (2008-12-01 14:57:52 GMT) Post-grading
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Thank you for the points, Andy - interesting discussion, all in all.
Selected response from:

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:12
Grading comment
Thanks for all thoughts, suggestion, references and considerations each of you provided.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +1monist
Helen Shiner
4unicist
Drmanu49


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
unicist


Explanation:
15 May 2006 ... He is the creator and developer of The Unicist Theory, which is based ... Education, Epistemology, Psychology, Sociology and Life Sciences. ...
www.unicist-library.org/en/unicistwiki_library/index.php/Pe... - 16k -

.. alliance and analysability, has led to an «unicist» approach. ..... (Eds): The Concept of Defense Mechanisms, in: Contemporary Psychology: Theoretical, ...
www.cairn.info/article_p.php?ID_ARTICLE=PSYS_021_0021 -

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 39 mins (2008-11-26 14:03:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

16 Dec 2006 ... The area is commonly referred to as organisation theory, ... Labour Process Theory; Critical Management Studies; Unicist Natural ...
en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Introduction_to_Sociology/Organizations - 42k -

Belohlavek, P. (2006) The Unicist Theory of Evolution. ... Shah, I. (1978) Learning how to learn: Psychology and spirituality in the sufi way. ...
www.unicist.org/es/papers/ukm_mining_es.pdf

The Unicist Theory of Evolution The ontology of evolution ... TOPICS The Unicist Theory of Evolution applied to the evolution of: ...
www.theoryofevolution.net/wiute_form_fr.html - 37k

It is the result of a future research study grounded on the unicist theory of evolution and the unicist methodology for scenario building. ...
www.unicistinstitute.net/ - 35k



Drmanu49
France
Local time: 05:12
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 58

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Helen Shiner: One of your references is a translation from the FR and it may therefore be unreliable. The other refers to one particular theory which may or may not be appropriate here.
26 mins
  -> These are not the only ones...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
monist


Explanation:
Monism is any philosophical view which holds that there is unity in a given field of inquiry, where this is not to be expected. Thus, some philosophers may hold that the Universe is really just one thing, despite its many appearances and diversities: or theology may support the view that there is one God, with many manifestations in different religions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monism

Please consult this article in full as it describes many different forms of monism and I presume you will need to be precise.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2008-11-26 13:51:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Monism is a philosophical term deriving from the Greek "monos," meaning "one," "alone," or "unique." Monism opposes to Dualism and Pluralism in its denial that the appearance of a multiplicity of different phenomena are really aspects of an underlying whole or unity. Ancient Hindu philosophers considered the world of our sensory experience to be illusion [maya], and early Greek philosophers agreed that sensory knowledge is untrustworthy for determining the true nature of things.

Epistemological Monism in its classical form is known as Absolutism. It states that both subject and object are mere apects of a single abstract, unlimited consciousness - or state of being - termed "The Absolute," and is used in describing absolutist forms of monotheism, panpsychism and even reductive materialism (all things that exist are reducible to matter/energy).

Monism is consistent with the universal quality of mysticism, in that it affirms the all-embracing sense of "one-ness" or unity in the experience of mystical states [a.k.a. euphoric vision]. This apprehension of a fundamental unity of being has been reported throughout recorded history by mystics representing the full range of cultural religious/philosophical traditions.
http://www.iscid.org/encyclopedia/Monism

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 44 mins (2008-11-26 14:08:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It could well be that in your particular context, 'unifying' would be more appropriate, but it is difficult for us to judge.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2008-11-26 21:35:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In light of what you have provided as extra context, my sources and the one liz has appended to her agree, I do think it appropriate to use 'monist', since it is not used in an individualised manner, particular only to one theory. I hope this helps.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2008-11-26 21:37:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also, 'unifying' is about bringing things together, whereas 'monist' is about considering them as one.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs (2008-11-26 23:15:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

My comment was based on the sentence you gave originally. If the author believes in a continuity between things then in one key sense they are indivisible; thus 'monist' is appropriate. I suppose you will have to determine whether that is what you are looking for. If things, for him, were completely distinct and he was concerned with finding a way to bring them together then that would be 'unifying'. To use your instance of North and South Poles: he would have to make one pole out of both of them to be unifying. Monism is believing a common thread runs through all things, that everything is of the Maker, for instance.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 days (2008-12-01 14:57:52 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thank you for the points, Andy - interesting discussion, all in all.

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 26
Grading comment
Thanks for all thoughts, suggestion, references and considerations each of you provided.
Notes to answerer
Asker: In a way what this author does is he unifies opposing couples by finding the link between these couples: One could say for example that North and South pole are connected and created from the same source, however: they remain different. So in a way, he never considers two individual parts of one couple 'as one', he just unifies them trough a common law, a common ground from where they sprout. Rather than 'making one', I'd say he 'brings things together' by finding that common ground while still remaining the individuality of all different originating couples. Here's an analogy that might help: light trough a prism: when you consider all individual colors, if you know how a prism creates this spectrum, you can easily show that these colors have in fact a common source. The emphasis remains on the different colors, since they clearly have different properties to some extend, but what brings them together, what makes them homologous, is this one beam of white light that goes trough a prism. Rather than trying to find 'just' this source, the author shows all three: individual colors, prism and source... I get the impression that 'bringing together' is closer than 'consider as one'... how do you feel about it?

Asker: I ended up using 'monistic': It's contrasting to 'dualistic', gives a feeling of motion as well and it fits nicely between all other used terms: "spiritualistic", "materialistic", "monistic", "dualistic"


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  liz askew: http://216.239.59.132/search?q=cache:tIvMfuB97dUJ:www.panthe...
39 mins
  -> Thank you, liz - a useful source.

neutral  Melissa McMahon: monism is certainly the usual contrasting term to dualism, which is why it bothers me that he doesn't use it. The other incidences of "unicism" on the net sound as esoteric as this, so I think it may be a special theory./Yes, agree, see discussion note.
13 hrs
  -> I have wondered the same thing. I guess Andy will have to determine this based on the no. of occurrences of the term. Difficult for us to advise without seeing the whole text.
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