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accompagnement temoin

English translation: carer

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:accompagnement temoin
English translation:carer
Entered by: Pascale Dahan
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20:39 Dec 11, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Psychology / Psychiatry
French term or phrase: accompagnement temoin
Someone who would take a psychotic patient in for treatment.

It obviously sounds like a legal term.

Would 'legal guardian' fit in this context? Not sure at all.

Thanks for your help.
Pascale Dahan
United States
Local time: 12:03
carer
Explanation:
In the UK at least, a "carer" (i.e. someone who cares) is a sort of catch-all word for adults who are looking after someone else.
Not necessarily a guardian, which has legal connotations, although the person may perform some of a guardian's tasks - looking after the finances, for example.
It usually applies to people looking after someone who cannot, for whatever reason, look after themselves. Usually at home, unpaid, usually a family member, and yes, they would usually get involved in medical decision-making (e.g. go with the person to hospital, doctor) if only to help explain what is going on, maybe offer (lay) advice.

Since you refer to "taking in" for treatment, it seems to me that the person is not a healthcare professional, more likely to just be someone who helps the 'patient' (or patient-to-be), hence the word "carer" sprang to mind.

Anyway, without more context (i.e. in French) it's hard to be sure, but, for the UK at least, I would be tempted to use "carer", faute de mieux.
Selected response from:

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 20:03
Grading comment
Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5please note the GRAMMARJane Lamb-Ruiz
3 +1witness/companionRHELLER
4supported by/with the support of a witnessZIL
3carerCharlie Bavington
2caretaker witnesstoubabou


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
caretaker witness


Explanation:
only a suggestion as more context would be needed here

toubabou
Local time: 15:03
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
supported by/with the support of a witness


Explanation:
'support' is used a lot now and conveys the 'accompagnement' bit. I don't like 'witness' but the FRench seems to call for it.

ZIL
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
witness/companion


Explanation:
what is their purpose?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 41 mins (2003-12-11 21:21:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In response to your note, this could be the guardian. This is the legal term. I am the guardian for my mother and I had to go to court to make it official. Some states in the U.S. might use the term \"conservator of the person\".

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 13:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: that's a tuteur from tutelle
4 hrs
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50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
please note the GRAMMAR


Explanation:
accompagnement means to accompany, to follow IT IS A NOUN

TEMOIN after that word is an adjective NOT A NOUN

so this is not a PERSON. It is a process.

the process of witnessing the illness or something of that nature...

the noun is compagnon...NOT

that's All I can tell you....

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Note added at 2003-12-11 21:32:00 (GMT)
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I do not believe it is a legal term....

I think you got this out of some longer text and as such I can make no sense of it without more context...

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Note added at 2003-12-12 01:35:46 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think this is what is called a

PATIENT ADVOCATE

more to come

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Note added at 2003-12-12 01:40:42 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In Iowa, I found this definition, but that\'s the general idea anyway:

***The advocate\'s role is to protect the respondent\'s rights during the involuntary hospital***ization process. ***The advocate is a person who must have an \"informed concern for the welfare and rehabilitation of the mentally ill\" and who is not an officer or employee of the Department of Human Services*** nor of any agency providing care or treatment to persons with mental illness

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Note added at 2003-12-12 01:52:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Now, here\'s something in French:
Description du projet: L\'IMS de Ciney est un centre qui accueille des handicapés mentaux sévères et profonds. L\'Institut propose un service résidentiel avec un accompagnement individualisé et spécialisé en collaboration avec les familles.

This means individual support...

So, I am now thinking your term is:

SUPPORT ADVOCACY

where accompagnement is support and temoin is advocacy...to be an advocate for someone...



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Note added at 2003-12-12 01:53:58 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

the support ADVOCATE would then be in French

accompagnaTEUR témoin

Of course, I could be wrong

Anyway, it\'s not guardian...guardian in French is tuteur (tutelle) or garde (children)

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Note added at 2003-12-12 13:27:47 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Legal: (support) advocate
Non-legal: caregiver (I might say)


Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  toubabou: whatever!
3 hrs
  -> 'What I said about the structure is not incorrect..sorry it makes you so hangry

neutral  CHE124: I don't see why this can't be translated closely as an "accompanying witness". But it is hard to tell whose side this person is on : is she/he a "collaborative witness" or what one might call a "support person"?
3 days 4 hrs
  -> because there is no such thing....AND, accompagnement temoin would NOT be accompanying witness...that would be temoin accompagnateur...that's why i got the other idea...temoin here is to advocate, I'm 90% sure....:)

agree  jlrsnyder: I appreciate the extensive research you have done for this question. I think your suggestions are helpful.
2538 days
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
carer


Explanation:
In the UK at least, a "carer" (i.e. someone who cares) is a sort of catch-all word for adults who are looking after someone else.
Not necessarily a guardian, which has legal connotations, although the person may perform some of a guardian's tasks - looking after the finances, for example.
It usually applies to people looking after someone who cannot, for whatever reason, look after themselves. Usually at home, unpaid, usually a family member, and yes, they would usually get involved in medical decision-making (e.g. go with the person to hospital, doctor) if only to help explain what is going on, maybe offer (lay) advice.

Since you refer to "taking in" for treatment, it seems to me that the person is not a healthcare professional, more likely to just be someone who helps the 'patient' (or patient-to-be), hence the word "carer" sprang to mind.

Anyway, without more context (i.e. in French) it's hard to be sure, but, for the UK at least, I would be tempted to use "carer", faute de mieux.

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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