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Il est sûr d'être rapidement sur pied

English translation: they're sure they'll soon be better

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Il est sûr d'être rapidement sur pied.
English translation:they're sure they'll soon be better
Entered by: Tony M
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18:46 Dec 10, 2016
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Social Sciences - Psychology / Essays
French term or phrase: Il est sûr d'être rapidement sur pied
Avec enthousiasme, saute par-dessus les objections qu’on lui présente et voit immédiatement le projet réalisé pour la plus grande satisfaction de tous. Le pessimiste se sent toujours guetté par la maladie : à la moindre indisposition, il pense à l’hôpital et même au cimetière ; il a évidemment fait son testament et il est prêt à convoquer ses amis pour leur dire un dernier adieu. L’optimiste se sent toujours bien portant et, s’il tombe malade, il est sûr d’être rapidement sur pied.
Et puisque le monde va mal, que les gens sont méchants et que tous les bons projets sont plus ou moins voués à l’échec, le pessimiste en conclut qu’il ne vaut pas tellement la peine d’agir ni de travailler pour les autres. Il se contente de régler ses propres affaires, abandonnant les humains à leur triste sort.
Chakib Roula
Algeria
Local time: 00:25
they're sure to soon be better
Explanation:
In more colloquial language, probably closer to the FR, one could say 'to soon be up and about again'



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Note added at 54 minutes (2016-12-10 19:40:19 GMT)
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There is to me a potential ambiguity in the source text that perhaps our FR native-speaker colleagues might wish to comment upon.

As I see it, this construction with "Il est sûr..." could be some kind of impersonal construction, conveying the idea "we are sure to see them back..." — if this is truly the intended meaning, then I'd tend to take my translation more in the direction of something like "They're bound to be up-and-about again soon".

HOWEVER, the 'il' COULD also be more personal, and refer directly to the optimist: they are sure in their own mind they won't be ill for long.

I do think it's important to consider both of these possibilites, since it could certainly make a nice difference in the EN translation.

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Note added at 4 heures (2016-12-10 23:24:27 GMT)
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I am astonished at the response to "my" split infinitive — I really thought those went out with aspidistras and antimacassars! OK, some split infinitives simply don't work, and that's en end to it; but ever since 'Star Trek' brought them into the public eye in the '60s, I thought they had more or less gone out of fashion, like saying 'I/we shall'
However, it's a shame that the position I happened to choose for 'soon' has become a key issue in some people's minds — of course, you can try it in various positions and see which one works for you. I just felt where I put it was the most accurate way of conveying the idea that was in my head; the construction I used with 'sure to' does somwhat rstrict the number of places it can go, and I personally felt that pushing it right to the end subtly changes the meaning, or at least feel.

I suppose in my mind, I was think of expressions like even the person's saying to themsleves: "Oh, you'll soon be better!" which to me sounds more appropriate here than "Oh, you'll be better soon!"
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:25
Grading comment
Thank you Tony.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2are bound to make a quick recovery
Marc Quantin
4 +2they're sure to soon be better
Tony M
4she or he is sure to recover almost immediately
Barbara Cochran, MFA


Discussion entries: 17





  

Answers


31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Il est sûr d\'être rapidement sur pied.
she or he is sure to recover almost immediately


Explanation:
From illness, which is what is being described here.

Barbara Cochran, MFA
United States
Local time: 19:25
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you Barbara.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Oh, I see 'immediately' isn't over-used here then?
18 mins
  -> No, not at all, but one could use "right away" interchangeably, in this instance.
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
il est sûr d'être rapidement sur pied.
they're sure to soon be better


Explanation:
In more colloquial language, probably closer to the FR, one could say 'to soon be up and about again'



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 54 minutes (2016-12-10 19:40:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

There is to me a potential ambiguity in the source text that perhaps our FR native-speaker colleagues might wish to comment upon.

As I see it, this construction with "Il est sûr..." could be some kind of impersonal construction, conveying the idea "we are sure to see them back..." — if this is truly the intended meaning, then I'd tend to take my translation more in the direction of something like "They're bound to be up-and-about again soon".

HOWEVER, the 'il' COULD also be more personal, and refer directly to the optimist: they are sure in their own mind they won't be ill for long.

I do think it's important to consider both of these possibilites, since it could certainly make a nice difference in the EN translation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 heures (2016-12-10 23:24:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I am astonished at the response to "my" split infinitive — I really thought those went out with aspidistras and antimacassars! OK, some split infinitives simply don't work, and that's en end to it; but ever since 'Star Trek' brought them into the public eye in the '60s, I thought they had more or less gone out of fashion, like saying 'I/we shall'
However, it's a shame that the position I happened to choose for 'soon' has become a key issue in some people's minds — of course, you can try it in various positions and see which one works for you. I just felt where I put it was the most accurate way of conveying the idea that was in my head; the construction I used with 'sure to' does somwhat rstrict the number of places it can go, and I personally felt that pushing it right to the end subtly changes the meaning, or at least feel.

I suppose in my mind, I was think of expressions like even the person's saying to themsleves: "Oh, you'll soon be better!" which to me sounds more appropriate here than "Oh, you'll be better soon!"

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11
Grading comment
Thank you Tony.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you Tony.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: "up and about" is by far the most natural solution. //The split infinitive gets me too, but it can be corrected. "... is sure to be up and about in no time".
37 mins
  -> Thanks, Nikki! Yes, I was hesitating about the register, but it does seem to be fairly chatty and describing the character types using everyday language, so I do believe it would fit in well here./Yes, getting rid of 'soon' solves the problem!

neutral  Barbara Cochran, MFA: Awfully vague, really bland-sounding expression, as opposed to that which is literary in style, which would engage the reader a great deal more.
38 mins
  -> Luckily, I don't have to immediately concern myself with other people's amount of satisfaction with that which is too literal of an interpretation. I just try to convey what the author wrote in a similar, concise, reader-friendly manner.

agree  Jennifer White: agree (but, for the purist - a split infinitive??!!)/ Nothing vague about it!
56 mins
  -> Thanks, Jennifer! Oh, I think those have been debunked a long time ago now... I was one of the first fools "to boldly go" where angels fear to tread ;-) Just try moving 'soon', it changes the meaning. / Thanks, again, Jennifer!

neutral  ormiston: your split infinitive really grates. why not say '(the optimist) is convinced he'll be up and about in no time'? You virtually posted that yourself
4 hrs
  -> Well, you can play with the word order to suit your own taste; personally, I felt it sat best where it is... and the old 'split infinitive' myth was debunked years ago.

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: agree with others about split infinitive and don't agree it was "debunked", "to soon be" is really awkward imo so with Nikki's rearrangement and "up and about"
18 hrs
  -> Well, the substance of my suggestion is fine, you just need to change the position of 'soon' to suit your own taste; however, Nikki's solution is the best.
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Il est sûr d\'être rapidement sur pied.
are bound to make a quick recovery


Explanation:
"... when taken ill, are bound to make a quick recovery."

Marc Quantin
France
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: As I discussed in my answer above, I believed this was one possible interpretation of the potential ambiguity in the S/T — though as Polyglot has since pointed out, no such ambiguity actually exists.
1 hr

agree  Yvonne Gallagher
6 hrs

agree  Verginia Ophof
8 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Dec 12, 2016 - Changes made by Yolanda Broad:
Term askedIl est sûr d\\\'être rapidement sur pied. » Il est sûr d\'être rapidement sur pied
Dec 11, 2016 - Changes made by Tony M:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/1845319">Chakib Roula's</a> old entry - "Il est sûr d\\\'être rapidement sur pied." » "they\'re sure to soon be better"


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