se doit d'être au rendez-vous avec

English translation: must get on board to

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:se doit d'être au rendez-vous avec
English translation:must get on board to
Entered by: PB Trans
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

11:22 Oct 25, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Real Estate / Real Estate Company
French term or phrase: se doit d'être au rendez-vous avec
XXX a pour mandat de loger les ministères et organismes publics du gouvernement du Québec et de leur fournir les services connexes au meilleur rapport qualité/prix .

Avec un chiffre d'affaires de 663 M$ au 31 mars 2005, 644 employés, 2,9 M de mètres carrés de superficies et 1 061 immeubles, XXX se doit d'être au rendez-vous avec la réingénierie de l'état.
PB Trans
Local time: 22:36
must get on board
Explanation:
It's rather informal, but then the original expression in French is equally informal. The idea is XXX has an implicit duty to contribute or comply.
Selected response from:

Ana Traversa
Local time: 18:36
Grading comment
Thank you all for your answers. Thanks Ana for the useful link.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2is the ideal company to meet the real estate needs
Jane Lamb-Ruiz
3 +4can't afford to miss out on
Tony M
4 +1is a natural/ideal/automatic candidate to take part in
xxxCMJ_Trans
4 +1cannot afford to miss out on the opportunity to be involved in the State's restructuring
HelenG
4must get on board
Ana Traversa
3rise to the occasion
Jocelyne S
3 -1should be within its capabilities
John Peterson


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
se doit d'être au rendez-vous avec
must get on board


Explanation:
It's rather informal, but then the original expression in French is equally informal. The idea is XXX has an implicit duty to contribute or comply.


    Reference: http://www.cjnr.mcgill.ca/TOC/30_3.html
Ana Traversa
Local time: 18:36
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you all for your answers. Thanks Ana for the useful link.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
se doit d'être au rendez-vous avec
rise to the occasion


Explanation:
Another way to put it...

Jocelyne S
France
Local time: 23:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
should be within its capabilities


Explanation:
or should be able to meet the challenge

John Peterson
Local time: 22:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: I don't honestly think that the construction using 'se doit de...' reflects as 'should be able to..' here, does it?
6 mins
  -> In this context I think it does
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
se doit d'être au rendez-vous avec
can't afford to miss out on


Explanation:
I know it's a bit of a departure from the original, but I can't help thinking this is the sentiment being expressed here: they've clearly got a huge investment, so they really need to get involved...

"can't afford to miss the boat..." would be in line with Ana's informal "on board" analogy, but I have slight reservations about the register here...

Seems to me this is a band-waggon they need to climb on, but don't actually want to say as much!

The equivalent English expression "They owe it to themselves to...", although probably not directly usable here, seems to me to convey the right degree of imperative.

Tony M
France
Local time: 23:36
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 326

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John Peterson: As I see it's not a question of missing out (they've got the contract or whatever) it's the presumption that they've got the resources etc. to deliver
8 mins
  -> Thanks, John! Surely if they were NOT 'au rendez-vous', it would mean they were missing out, no?

agree  NancyLynn: I like both Can't afford to miss out on and Owe it to themselves to
52 mins
  -> Thanks, Nancy! :-)

agree  RHELLER: "owe it to themselves to " is the way I understand the phrase
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rita! I think that gives a good guide to the core meaning, doesn't it?

agree  sporran
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Sporran!

agree  xxxPFB: and with Nabcy and RIta
7 hrs
  -> Merci, Philippe !
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
se doit d'être au rendez-vous avec
cannot afford to miss out on the opportunity to be involved in the State's restructuring


Explanation:
I agree with Dusty for the first part of the phrase but noticed that none of the answers seemed to address the 'rendez-vous' part which seems equally difficult to me.

This is my suggestion which is heavier than the source language sentence but does I believe, convey the same message in an idiomatic way.

HelenG
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:36
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: As I said to JP, my intention was that 'they needed to be involved in' = 'they can't afford to miss out on...' See what I mean?
3 mins
  -> Hi Dusty! I see exactly what you mean. It is just that 'cannot afford to miss out on the State's restructuring' does not sound as idiomatic in English, IMHO.

neutral  John Peterson: I've come across être au rendez-vous as meaning something like meeting/coming up to expectations; so it may be that they have the wherewithal to be up to the job in hand.
41 mins
  -> So have I, but that wouldn't make sense in this context IMHO

agree  xxxfrenchloki
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, anneh
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
is a natural/ideal/automatic candidate to take part in


Explanation:
could hardly fail to be involved in


is a "must" to take part in

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 23:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 48

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sylvia Smith: any one of these captures the idea well!
52 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
se doit d'être au rendez-vous avec
is the ideal company to meet the real estate needs


Explanation:
the government's real estate partner..why not

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 26 mins (2005-10-25 12:49:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

etre au rendez vous means to be in the right place at the right time ie to be the ideal company to do a particular job..that is all it means...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs 47 mins (2005-10-25 20:10:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

se doit etre= is..in this marketing context

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs 48 mins (2005-10-25 20:11:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or
has made it a point to be the ideal company to meet the real estate needs

if you must...:)

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 92

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sue Pasco
19 mins

agree  Elizabeth Lyons
1 hr

neutral  xxxfrenchloki: It's not that simple - "se doit" means "must" or "has a duty to be".
2 hrs
  -> should be..here..this is marketing or journalistic discourse so that se doit de really doesn't matter probably

neutral  Tony M: Jane, your second note refers to 'se doit être', but please note, the whole crux of the matter is that it is 'se doit DE...' -- a different expression entirely!
7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search