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suppression des 6ème et 7ème étages d'une tour

English translation: removal of 6th and 7th storeys of a tower-block

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16:53 Feb 18, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Real Estate / real estate
French term or phrase: suppression des 6ème et 7ème étages d'une tour
avec redressement du comble du 4ème étage, création de circulations verticales et suppression des 6ème et 7ème étages d'une tour, situés 37/39 avenue Montaigne.
Many thanks,
Linebyline
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:01
English translation:removal of 6th and 7th storeys of a tower-block
Explanation:
Well, it sounds as if they are actually going to demolish them completely!

If you know it is only offices (i.e. non-residential), you might prefer to say 'tower office-block' or 'tower of offices', to avoid the negative connotation of 'tower-blocks' = low-quality, dated housing in the UK.

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Note added at 3713 jours (2016-04-20 14:42:50 GMT) Post-grading
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As Bourth so rightly said, 'floor' is better; as BDF has kindly just pointed out, using the word 'storey' here is actually a little odd, as well as introducing an inadvertent potential ambiguity.

While we're on the subject, do note that the way floors are numbered is different between EN-US and EN-GB — my answer would only be correct for GB, and then only if talking about 'floors', not 'storeys'.

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Note added at 3713 jours (2016-04-20 16:16:34 GMT) Post-grading
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Ah yes, B, but I didn't have spce to explain below!
What I meant was, we'd never call the ground-floor "the first storey" — in this specific situation, 'storey' normally means 'upper storey' (just like 'étage', as you say); BUT as you so rightly say, we DO talk about an 'n-storey building', where the 'n' count includes the g/f!
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:01
Grading comment
Thanks very much for your help,
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +9removal of 6th and 7th storeys of a tower-block
Tony M
4 +1demolitionxxxBourth
4 -4erasing the 6th and 7th stages of a tower (building)
Bogdan Popovici


  

Answers


52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -4
suppression des 6ème et 7ème étages d'une tour
erasing the 6th and 7th stages of a tower (building)


Explanation:
it is not very different of the previous answer, it is a matter of taste...

Bogdan Popovici
Local time: 09:01
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Sorry, but no, it ISN'T just a matter of taste! For one thing, in English we don't talk about the 'stages' of a building, and for another, it's not really the sort of thing that can be 'erased', like a pencil mark.
1 hr

disagree  Josephine79: As Dusty says, in English neither "erase" or "stage" is appropriate here.
2 hrs

disagree  writeaway: with Dusty. it's just incorrect English in the context.
3 hrs

disagree  xxxdf49f: "a matter of TASTE"??... maybe more a matter of accuracy, correct understanding of French and correct English writing! :)) this sentence makes no sense - try back-translating: "effacer les étapes d'une tour"?? :((
3 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
suppression des 6ème et 7ème étages d'une tour
demolition


Explanation:
Demolition. Dusty said so himself!!!

I can't see them "removing" the storeys (lifting them off with a crane and putting them on top of a building somewhere else that has shrunk or has an inferiority complex!) - not unless it's a very small building!

During much of this time, the building’s operators were able to delay the DEMOLITION of the top floors despite a Supreme Court decision against them way back ...
216.46.170.184/education/site2004/wnjn0804.htm

ordered the closure of the Bacolod Airport and the DEMOLITION of the top floor of the Sugarland Hotel located near the runway which he alleged, ...
www.inq7.net/opi/2003/nov/09/opi_rjfarolan-1.htm

The year-long project will see the removal of the old canopy covering the platforms and the DEMOLITION of the top floor of the station building. ...
www.cwn.org.uk/business/a-z/ r/railtrack/2000/03/000307-rugby-station.htm


xxxBourth
Local time: 08:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 388

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, it seems most appropriate, though the image it conjures up is an alarming one!
10 hrs
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
suppression des 6ème et 7ème étages d'une tour
removal of 6th and 7th storeys of a tower-block


Explanation:
Well, it sounds as if they are actually going to demolish them completely!

If you know it is only offices (i.e. non-residential), you might prefer to say 'tower office-block' or 'tower of offices', to avoid the negative connotation of 'tower-blocks' = low-quality, dated housing in the UK.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3713 jours (2016-04-20 14:42:50 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

As Bourth so rightly said, 'floor' is better; as BDF has kindly just pointed out, using the word 'storey' here is actually a little odd, as well as introducing an inadvertent potential ambiguity.

While we're on the subject, do note that the way floors are numbered is different between EN-US and EN-GB — my answer would only be correct for GB, and then only if talking about 'floors', not 'storeys'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3713 jours (2016-04-20 16:16:34 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Ah yes, B, but I didn't have spce to explain below!
What I meant was, we'd never call the ground-floor "the first storey" — in this specific situation, 'storey' normally means 'upper storey' (just like 'étage', as you say); BUT as you so rightly say, we DO talk about an 'n-storey building', where the 'n' count includes the g/f!

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:01
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 310
Grading comment
Thanks very much for your help,

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sporran
3 mins
  -> Thanks, Sporran!

agree  chaplin: I strongly agree!
19 mins
  -> Thank you most warmly!

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne
28 mins
  -> Thanks, Nikki!

agree  Charlie Bavington: I'd be tempted to say just "block" or even "building", actually, since assuming these are the top 2 storeys, it ain't much of a "tower". If they aren't the top 2 storeys, the mind boggles....! :-)
45 mins
  -> Thanks, Charlie! True, indeed. Tho' I've seen them use 'tour' in this way to make it clear this isn't one of those long, barrack-like blocks...

agree  Miranda Joubioux: I agree with Charlie!
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Miranda!

agree  xxxBourth: Agree with Charlie. I guess "tour" means "modern", as opposed to 6-7 storey Haussman buildings
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Alex! Yes, I think you've hit the nail on the head there; that's sort of what I was getting at.

agree  Josephine79: If you want to see a photo look up 35 av Montagne in the Yellow Pages (it's the Canadian embassy) and click on "photo" the building to the right is lower and only has four storeys! Just call me Sherlock. (of course I'm assuming this refers to Paris).
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Josephine! Nice hunting! Just call me "someone who has to pay for a slow dial-up connection" :-(

agree  writeaway
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, W/A! :-)

agree  RHELLER: absolument :-)
12 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rita! :-)

neutral  B D Finch: They would actually be the 7th and 8th storeys, i.e. the 6th and 7th floors in UK English. A 2-storey building has a ground floor and a 1st floor. Ah, but we do! A single-storey building is, in French, a "bâtiment sans étage".
3713 days
  -> Thanks, B! :-) Well, yes, I suppose it would have been better if I'd said 'floor', really — but then, we rarely refer to the g/f as a 'storey'; you've raised an intriguing ambiguity in the way we use 'storey'!
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