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fond de rayon (different context)

English translation: in-stock items

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:fond de rayon
English translation:in-stock items
Entered by: Karen Tucker
Options:
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15:00 May 29, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Retail / retailing
French term or phrase: fond de rayon (different context)
I know someone recently asked about this term and that it's in the glossary, but the translations provided - bottom shelf or end-of-aisle -don't seem to fit my context. Plus I've done a lot of research and the word is often used in contrast with promotional items, so I get the sense it means the standard, everyday, popular items. My French friend thinks it refers to everyday best-selling products. It's from a presentation about a major home furnishings retailer. Under the heading, "L'offre," it says: "Maintenir la capacite a gerer des couts en developpant le fond de rayon (le catalogue)."
Here's an excerpt from an article about Danone I found on a web site (the context is a labor strike): "Dananone a pourtant décidé de placer discrètement, "en fond de rayon", les nouveaux produits Danone qui devaient, normalement, faire l'objet d'une promotion "prévue depuis des mois".

Thanks, Karen (P.S. I found this term on numerous web sites, so I'm surprised it's not in any dictionaries or glossaires. Unfortunately, none of the sites had an English version.)
Karen Tucker
United States
Local time: 14:42
in-stock items versus positions
Explanation:
The big problem in food merchandising is knowing whether or not your company brands are on the shelf or not. This is simply called in-stock or out-of-stock. By the way, shelves are blocked by brand, and the super market workers just fill them up as they are told to do so. From the research I have done over the term before and now, I have come to the conclusion that Fond de Rayon means in-stock items for food and probably for clothes also. In a catalogue, it's clothes they have in stock. Doesn't this make sense? And in-stock items are the ones that sell the best. It does not I believe refer to the positioning of the product on the shelf. End-cap etc. That would be in-stock position.

PLEASE SEE www.datamining.com/retailwareh.htm - 7k
Selected response from:

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Grading comment
This makes a lot of sense, Jane, and fits the use of the term in all the web sites I saw. There was a clear distinction between "fond de rayon" and promotional items. Thanks for confirming and for providing the appropriate term. Karen
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1stock products
Gayle Wallimann
5in-stock items versus positionsJane Lamb-Ruiz
4regular liner
Florence B
4bottom of the rangenongang
4(as) products for mass consumption
Parrot
1bargain counterShilpa Dawda


  

Answers


27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
bargain counter


Explanation:
Could it be "bargain counter" ???.


Shilpa Dawda
India
Local time: 00:12
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
(as) products for mass consumption


Explanation:
Your context still fits into the definition given in the glossary (well, they might have erased the considerations that came with the answer). There is a difference of mentality to be translated as well between the French and the English, in which such products are opposed to "haut de gamme" (what we might call prestigious trademarks). But a champagne that is sold as "fond de rayon" in a supermarket won't have the same clout as a Moet Chandon that you will find in a specialised shop, if we have to think of an example.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 20:42
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
bottom of the range


Explanation:
bottom of the range / lower range category

nongang
Local time: 19:42
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51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
stock products


Explanation:


This is how I understand the context. These products are kept on stock, almost always available.


    Reference: http://www.metro.fr/html/alimentaire/epicerieplus.htm
Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 20:42
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Florence B: well, yes - but only with a language extension - actually it's the shelf and not the product itself - anyway it's the right meaning
21 mins
  -> I don't see that it's a language extension, but then I'm originally a US citizen. This is what we called products that we always ordered because we always sold them. (retail dept. store)
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
regular liner


Explanation:
neither top range neither low quality - just the usual liners.


Florence B
France
Local time: 20:42
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
in-stock items versus positions


Explanation:
The big problem in food merchandising is knowing whether or not your company brands are on the shelf or not. This is simply called in-stock or out-of-stock. By the way, shelves are blocked by brand, and the super market workers just fill them up as they are told to do so. From the research I have done over the term before and now, I have come to the conclusion that Fond de Rayon means in-stock items for food and probably for clothes also. In a catalogue, it's clothes they have in stock. Doesn't this make sense? And in-stock items are the ones that sell the best. It does not I believe refer to the positioning of the product on the shelf. End-cap etc. That would be in-stock position.

PLEASE SEE www.datamining.com/retailwareh.htm - 7k

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 40
Grading comment
This makes a lot of sense, Jane, and fits the use of the term in all the web sites I saw. There was a clear distinction between "fond de rayon" and promotional items. Thanks for confirming and for providing the appropriate term. Karen
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