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fond de caisse

English translation: till cash / float

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:fond de caisse (cash register)
English translation:till cash / float
Entered by: Karen Tucker
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13:53 Dec 10, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Retail / retail
French term or phrase: fond de caisse
This is from a procedural manual on handling cash payments for a chain of boutiques. Is this simply the bottom of the cash register drawer? Thanks, Karen

A la fermeture de la caisse, le fond de caisse doit etre isolé en premier de facon a compter plus facilement les especes encaissées ce jour-la.
Karen Tucker
United States
Local time: 12:47
till cash
Explanation:
I used to work as a salesgirl and we had to separate the till cash from the rest of the money in order to figure out how much was earned that day. It's a fixed amount of money that remains the same day to day in order to have money to make change for customers.

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Note added at 17 mins (2003-12-10 14:11:07 GMT)
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Where I worked, we used to have $50.00 in bills and coins to put in when the store opened. At closing, we took out $50.00 and then counted what was earned that day on that particular register.
Selected response from:

Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 18:47
Grading comment
Thanks very much, Gayle. I did find lots of hits for both "till cash" and "float." Karen
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2till cash
Gayle Wallimann
5 -1loose change OR coinsJane Lamb-Ruiz
5 -1simply the bottom
Clauwolf


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
simply the bottom


Explanation:
:) You are right!

Clauwolf
Local time: 14:47
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Gayle Wallimann: No, it's a set amount of money put in the register to start the day.
7 mins
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
loose change OR coins


Explanation:
no...fond de caisse means loose change in the cash of the cash register..as opposed the charges....



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Note added at 2003-12-10 14:02:27 (GMT)
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fond de caisse has nothing to do with lower portion or drawers...the fact is that coins or loose change are at the bottom of the cash register or drawer, hence the expression.

If you SET ASIDE and count the coins first, it\'s easier to then count the bills.



Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 40

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Charlie Bavington: what do you mean by "as opposed the charges", if it's not a stupendously stupid question, please?
4 mins
  -> charge slips as opposed to cash...charge card receipts

disagree  Gayle Wallimann: No, it's a set amount put in the drawer before starting the day.
5 mins
  -> Yes, Gayle but in everyday speech it means a little cash or money or coins...you are right re till cash
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
till cash


Explanation:
I used to work as a salesgirl and we had to separate the till cash from the rest of the money in order to figure out how much was earned that day. It's a fixed amount of money that remains the same day to day in order to have money to make change for customers.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2003-12-10 14:11:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Where I worked, we used to have $50.00 in bills and coins to put in when the store opened. At closing, we took out $50.00 and then counted what was earned that day on that particular register.


    www.wsu.edu/~forms/HTML/BPPM/30_Finance/ 30.59_Cash_Registers.htm - 8k
Gayle Wallimann
Local time: 18:47
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thanks very much, Gayle. I did find lots of hits for both "till cash" and "float." Karen

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charlie Bavington: ah - the float, I think it's called - a fixed amount they put in the till at the start of the working day, you mean? Makes perfect sense !!
3 mins
  -> Yes, I guess it could be called "the float" in some areas. I'm not familiar with that term.

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: Right, I don't disagree at all...it everyday speech it means what I said!
6 mins
  -> OK, except that you only mentioned coins or loose change as if that was all that was referred to. This is not all of the coins, it is a fixed sum of money to begin the day with.
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