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situé à l’aval hydraulique du Pz2

English translation: downstream

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:aval hydraulique
English translation:downstream
Entered by: Yolanda Broad
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17:56 May 18, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Science / hydrostatic measurements
French term or phrase: situé à l’aval hydraulique du Pz2
piezometer

also need à l'aplomb...I know this refers to high and low or upper end and lower end but don't know how to say it...thanx
Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Yes, downstream
Explanation:
A l'aval can mean downstream, downhill, downline, etc. What they mean, I think, is that the carpark is downstream of the piezometer (in the groundwater flow). Had they said simply "à l'aval", it might be thought that the carpark was downhill of the piezometer (a vertical line going up from the carpark would surface downhill of the top of the piezometer), the difference being that it could in fact be above the groundwater level and therefore not be strictly "downstream".

You haven't given the sentence, but I should think "à l'aplomb" would be vertically above (or below) something.

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Note added at 2003-05-18 22:48:12 (GMT)
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Re. \"aplomb\", since the school has to be at the surface, it must be ABOVE the piezometer.

Didn\'t understand why you were having a problem with this word until I looked in my dictionary. \"D\'aplomb\" is there, but no \"à l\'aplomb de\". Some 7000 Googles though, including \"Tracer la hauteur de la tringle à l\'aplomb de chaque côté de la fenêtre\" which clearly indicates the meaning.

Now did I answer that with aplomb, or did I not?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-18 23:50:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The piezometers might be sealed or unsealed (open standpipes). If the open type, and if the piezometer was drilled from the school, in Vincennes say, then it would communicate with the groundwater and substances from the subsurface (radon, say, having leaked from a photographic plant) could make its way to the surface.

Note that if the French \"piézomètre\" is not sealed off, it should be called a \"standpipe\", \"open standpipe\", \"standpipe piezometer\", or even \"open standpipe piezometer\". Piezometers are for measuring water pressure.

The following case, similar to yours apparently, has standpipes. These are used not to measure water pressure but to enable groundwater samples to be taken.

<<La pose des piézomètres (tubes d’une quinzaine ou vingtaine de mètres avec des trous lattéraux-crépines - sur presque toute la hauteur du tube) implique le creusement d’avant trous avec recueil des terres correspondantes (carottage). On a donc, si toutes les précautions sont prises, possibilité d’analyses de terre et de l’eau de la nappe qui pénètre dans le piézomètre.>>
[http://vigilancefranklin.ifrance.com/vigilancefranklin/doc/0...]


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-19 16:05:24 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Comments to comments:

\"below the level of\", to me, means vertically below. In the case in question, it is fair to assume that the groundwater into which the standpipes have been driven is moving. It will move downhill, yes, but the fact that traces of an element are found \"below\" another is pretty much irrelevant (unless you have a coal mine or something beneath the source of contamination). What matters is that the contamination is on the move pretty much horizontally as a result of the water movement (downhill, if \"downhill\" can be used for underground water) towards a river or something. So for \"à l\'aval hydraulique\", \"downstream\" is it (stream as in water, as in hydraulic). It seems to me that was my first comment.

A plumb line (plumb as in plomb as in lead, something heavy that when suspended from a string will hang as vertically as the Earth\'s rotation allows) serves to determine verticality, not level, so \"level with\" will not work. For the \"école à l\'aplomb du piézomètre\", you want something like \"school above the piezometer\", if the piezo does not surface, but is drilled from some subsurface space (tunnel, underground carpark, etc.), or \"school where the piezometer is located\" if it surfaces.
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 17:39
Grading comment
Listen, Bourth, I think you are getting there but you didn't actually give me a translation. But I found one: "level with" (like a plumb line)or as in your window example, "flush to or with". All this downstream and upstream. Most of the time, English eschews this. I know the meaning of the words en soi. I finally used "below the level of", the only doubt concerns the word hydraulique ...

You answer helped me find an answer
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1Yes, downstreamxxxBourth
5downstreamCoquine
4concentration (of...) measured downstream of Pz2xxxblomguib
3 -1pour à l'aplomb i would venture at the measurement point of, or just "at"
cjohnstone


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
downstream


Explanation:
a l'aval, en aval = downstream
amont = upstream


Domaine(s) : - génie mécanique
pompe et compresseur
- physique
mécanique des fluides


français
anglais

aval n. m.
downstream


Définition :
Côté refoulement d'une pompe, qui vient après le point considéré dans le sens de l'écoulement d'un fluide.


Note(s) :
Le terme aval peut être utilisé adjectivement; on parle, par exemple, d'un débit aval. On trouve aussi les locutions en aval de, en aval et à l'aval de.


[Office de la langue française, 2002]


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-19 12:39:53 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

since \"aplomb\" means perperndicular or vertical, \"à l’aplomb du\" would be \"underneath\" or \"beneath\'\'

\"hydraulique\" can mean water or fluid in this context.


    Reference: http://www.granddictionnaire.com
Coquine
Local time: 10:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 51
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
concentration (of...) measured downstream of Pz2


Explanation:
is what you would say when measuring for example pollution by drilling boreholes and placing peizometers...

As to "aplomb", can you give some context?


    eng. experience
xxxblomguib
Local time: 12:39
Native speaker of: Native in FlemishFlemish, Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in pair: 39
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Yes, downstream


Explanation:
A l'aval can mean downstream, downhill, downline, etc. What they mean, I think, is that the carpark is downstream of the piezometer (in the groundwater flow). Had they said simply "à l'aval", it might be thought that the carpark was downhill of the piezometer (a vertical line going up from the carpark would surface downhill of the top of the piezometer), the difference being that it could in fact be above the groundwater level and therefore not be strictly "downstream".

You haven't given the sentence, but I should think "à l'aplomb" would be vertically above (or below) something.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-18 22:48:12 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Re. \"aplomb\", since the school has to be at the surface, it must be ABOVE the piezometer.

Didn\'t understand why you were having a problem with this word until I looked in my dictionary. \"D\'aplomb\" is there, but no \"à l\'aplomb de\". Some 7000 Googles though, including \"Tracer la hauteur de la tringle à l\'aplomb de chaque côté de la fenêtre\" which clearly indicates the meaning.

Now did I answer that with aplomb, or did I not?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-18 23:50:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The piezometers might be sealed or unsealed (open standpipes). If the open type, and if the piezometer was drilled from the school, in Vincennes say, then it would communicate with the groundwater and substances from the subsurface (radon, say, having leaked from a photographic plant) could make its way to the surface.

Note that if the French \"piézomètre\" is not sealed off, it should be called a \"standpipe\", \"open standpipe\", \"standpipe piezometer\", or even \"open standpipe piezometer\". Piezometers are for measuring water pressure.

The following case, similar to yours apparently, has standpipes. These are used not to measure water pressure but to enable groundwater samples to be taken.

<<La pose des piézomètres (tubes d’une quinzaine ou vingtaine de mètres avec des trous lattéraux-crépines - sur presque toute la hauteur du tube) implique le creusement d’avant trous avec recueil des terres correspondantes (carottage). On a donc, si toutes les précautions sont prises, possibilité d’analyses de terre et de l’eau de la nappe qui pénètre dans le piézomètre.>>
[http://vigilancefranklin.ifrance.com/vigilancefranklin/doc/0...]


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-19 16:05:24 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Comments to comments:

\"below the level of\", to me, means vertically below. In the case in question, it is fair to assume that the groundwater into which the standpipes have been driven is moving. It will move downhill, yes, but the fact that traces of an element are found \"below\" another is pretty much irrelevant (unless you have a coal mine or something beneath the source of contamination). What matters is that the contamination is on the move pretty much horizontally as a result of the water movement (downhill, if \"downhill\" can be used for underground water) towards a river or something. So for \"à l\'aval hydraulique\", \"downstream\" is it (stream as in water, as in hydraulic). It seems to me that was my first comment.

A plumb line (plumb as in plomb as in lead, something heavy that when suspended from a string will hang as vertically as the Earth\'s rotation allows) serves to determine verticality, not level, so \"level with\" will not work. For the \"école à l\'aplomb du piézomètre\", you want something like \"school above the piezometer\", if the piezo does not surface, but is drilled from some subsurface space (tunnel, underground carpark, etc.), or \"school where the piezometer is located\" if it surfaces.

xxxBourth
Local time: 17:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 18679
Grading comment
Listen, Bourth, I think you are getting there but you didn't actually give me a translation. But I found one: "level with" (like a plumb line)or as in your window example, "flush to or with". All this downstream and upstream. Most of the time, English eschews this. I know the meaning of the words en soi. I finally used "below the level of", the only doubt concerns the word hydraulique ...

You answer helped me find an answer

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  cjohnstone
49 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
pour à l'aplomb i would venture at the measurement point of, or just "at"


Explanation:
an idea

cjohnstone
France
Local time: 17:39
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1632

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Coquine: aplomb = perpendicular, vertical
16 hrs
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