flottaison inclinée

English translation: heeled waterline

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15:02 Jun 12, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Ships, Sailing, Maritime / EN-UK
French term or phrase: flottaison inclinée
"les caractéristiques détaillées de la flottaison droite initiale;
les caractéristiques des flottaisons inclinées de 2,5 en 2,5 degrés jusqu’à Ө= 65 degrés"

I've translated "flottaison droite" as "level trim", but don't know whether I should use the term "trim" or "heel" here.
B D Finch
France
Local time: 19:29
English translation:heeled waterline
Explanation:
The waterline changes depending on what is happening to the boat. "Effective waterline" is a good solution if the context makes it clear what is happening to the boat at the time in question. Anita gives a clear explanation of the relevance of waterline length when heeled.

Note that "waterplanes" (plans de flottaison) (Aw) are the horizontal planes of a ship's hull and that "waterlines" (lignes de flottaison) are the lines of intersection. The "length on the waterline" or "waterline length" (Lwl) is the length on the waterline on which the boat happens to be floating.
"Trim" is the difference between the draughts forward and aft.

"Heeled waterline" is used, often with "maximum".

http://stevedmarineconsulting.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03...

"The
American Boat & Yacht Council’s
“Standards and Technical Information
Reports for Small Craft,” section H27,
states, “All piping, tubing, or hose
lines penetrating the hull below the
maximum heeled waterline, under all
normal conditions of trim and heel,
shall be equipped with a seacock to
stop the admission of water in the
event of failure of pipes, tubing, or
hose….”.

"Note that “the maximum heeled
waterline” on a sailing vessel is the
level of the water on the hull when it
is inclined such that the sheer is awash
amidships. According to the ABYC
standard, hull penetrations that are wet
at this angle of heel require seacocks.
For power vessels, the guideline
covers all hull penetrations that would
be submerged if the vessel were to
heel 7° "

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-06-12 18:29:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The bit from "Note that.." to "forward and aft" is from Eric Tupper's "Introduction to Naval architesture", pp5, 8-11).
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 19:29
Grading comment
Thanks again
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5heeled waterline
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
5 -1effective waterline
Anita Planchon
3 -2inclined hull
Daryo


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
effective waterline


Explanation:
The "effective waterline" is the waterline (which the length of the hull of the boat at the point where it sits at the surface of the water) when the boat is heeled. The effective waterline is often longer than the waterline when the boat is not heeled, as there is a hull overhang which comes into contact with the water when the boat is heeled. This is why heeling a boat is good for speed when racing (if the boat is designed that way). The "flottaison droite initiale" would be simply the waterline or, if its a very technical article the "load waterline" which is the waterline when the boat is level as Florence suggests.

The article below gives a bit of an explanation.


    Reference: http://https://www.sailingworld.com/how-to/how-heel-affects-...
Anita Planchon
Australia
Local time: 19:29
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Anita. Unfortunately, your link doesn't work – probably due to the way the website cuts off the end of links. I just wonder whether the term you suggest is right for my context, which is not about racing boats, but the (stability file) design of a moderately sedate type of boat.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Daryo: that's "ligne de flottaison inclinée", not "flottaison inclinée"
15 hrs
  -> I'm pretty confident that 'ligne de' is just missing in abbreviation.

neutral  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: This is an effective suggestion (pun intended) and which works perfectly well. Your explanation is really clear. It's just that I think the "mot juste" is "heeled". ;-)
22 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
heeled waterline


Explanation:
The waterline changes depending on what is happening to the boat. "Effective waterline" is a good solution if the context makes it clear what is happening to the boat at the time in question. Anita gives a clear explanation of the relevance of waterline length when heeled.

Note that "waterplanes" (plans de flottaison) (Aw) are the horizontal planes of a ship's hull and that "waterlines" (lignes de flottaison) are the lines of intersection. The "length on the waterline" or "waterline length" (Lwl) is the length on the waterline on which the boat happens to be floating.
"Trim" is the difference between the draughts forward and aft.

"Heeled waterline" is used, often with "maximum".

http://stevedmarineconsulting.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03...

"The
American Boat & Yacht Council’s
“Standards and Technical Information
Reports for Small Craft,” section H27,
states, “All piping, tubing, or hose
lines penetrating the hull below the
maximum heeled waterline, under all
normal conditions of trim and heel,
shall be equipped with a seacock to
stop the admission of water in the
event of failure of pipes, tubing, or
hose….”.

"Note that “the maximum heeled
waterline” on a sailing vessel is the
level of the water on the hull when it
is inclined such that the sheer is awash
amidships. According to the ABYC
standard, hull penetrations that are wet
at this angle of heel require seacocks.
For power vessels, the guideline
covers all hull penetrations that would
be submerged if the vessel were to
heel 7° "

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-06-12 18:29:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The bit from "Note that.." to "forward and aft" is from Eric Tupper's "Introduction to Naval architesture", pp5, 8-11).

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 19:29
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 186
Grading comment
Thanks again
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Nikki, I think this looks like the right term for my context. Googling it with extra bits of context produced very relevant results.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Zeineb Nalouti
2 hrs

disagree  Daryo: that's "ligne de flottaison inclinée", not "flottaison inclinée"
13 hrs
  -> This is all about the "ligne de flottaison" and stability calculations. In this context the "ligne de" is understood.
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -2
inclined hull


Explanation:

just on its own "flottaison" refers to the fact that the ship is not sinking, stays at the surface - its about the whole ship - not the related waterline, or righting lever arm / or righting moment ...

so "flottaison inclinée" simply mean that the ship is floating [not sinking] and is at angle compared to the desirable "upright position"

Daryo
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:29
Does not meet criteria
Native speaker of: Native in SerbianSerbian, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Anita Planchon: "ligne de" is often dropped off to abbreviate. This is definitely referring to the waterline. A heel can be more desirable rthan upright in many maritime situations.
1 hr
  -> I'm perfectly aware that "obvious" parts are often dropped - but there is far more than just the waterline that would be a "characteristic/property" of a ship that is not upright - like the "righting moment" that should increase with inclination etc ...

disagree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Sorry Daryo, but you have missed the main point here, viz., that this is about stability. "Inclinée" clearly shows that this is about the waterline when the boat is heeled.
7 hrs
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