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non malfaisance

English translation: non-maleficence

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:non malfaisance
English translation:non-maleficence
Entered by: cc in nyc
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10:27 Feb 18, 2012
French to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Social Science, Sociology, Ethics, etc. / outline of ethical issues
French term or phrase: non malfaisance
I have found references to the 'no harm' principle but woner if there is something neater or more appropriate here:

[L'Ethique] a pour mission essentielle d’éclairer les pratiques, les critiquer éventuellement en se fondant sur quelques principes universels, la non malfaisance, le respect de l’autonomie et de l’intérêt des personnes d’autant plus qu’elles sont vulnérables, la transparence de l’information, la justice distributive. Dans le domaine scientifique priment l’absence de manipulation des données, l’absence d’instrumentalisation des résultats au profit des seules retombées économiques, l’information claire sur les objectifs, en un mot la loyauté des chercheurs et des entreprises, vis à vis de la connaissance, ce qui est loin d’être malheureusement le cas dans un certain nombre de situations actuelles…
ormiston
Local time: 18:22
nonmaleficence
Explanation:
IMO... ;-)

non-malfaisance n. f.
Domaine(s) : - médecine
English non-maleficence
Définition : Principe d'éthique médicale selon lequel on ne doit pas nuire à autrui, que ce soit de façon délibérée ou par inadvertance.

http://www.granddictionnaire.com

On the English side, here's a medical definition from medilexicon:
nonmaleficence
1. The ethical principle of doing no harm, based on the Hippocratic maxim, primum non nocere, first do no harm.

http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=60976

Here's a quote from the "Medical Ethics" Wiki:
The concept of non-maleficence is embodied by the phrase, "first, do no harm," or the Latin, primum non nocere.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_ethics#Non-Maleficence

Also see:
Nonmaleficence, which derives from the maxim, is one of the principal precepts of medical ethics that all medical students are taught in medical school and is a fundamental principle for emergency medical services around the world.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primum_non_nocere

From the University of California Regents:
"Beneficence vs. Nonmaleficence"
http://missinglink.ucsf.edu/lm/ethics/Content Pages/fast_fac...

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Note added at 10 hrs (2012-02-18 20:29:35 GMT)
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@ ormiston: On second thought, I agree... I would probably use "non-maleficence" [with hyphen]. ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs (2012-02-18 22:15:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also for your consideration, since the context is medical ("an article written by & for doctors"):

nonmaleficence [non-mah-lef´ĭ-sens]
a principle of bioethics that asserts an obligation not to inflict harm intentionally. It is useful in dealing with difficult issues surrounding the terminally or seriously ill and injured. Some philosophers combine nonmaleficence and beneficence, considering them a single principle.

Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
nonmaleficence
Medical ethics A central guiding principle of the ethical practice of medicine, first expressed by Hippocrates, and translated into Latin as primum non nocere, first do no harm
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/nonmaleficen...

Selected response from:

cc in nyc
Local time: 12:22
Grading comment
thank you for all this. I still wonder slightly if the less flowery Hippocratic maxim 'do no harm' would be more familiar even to doctors!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2non-malfeasance
JaneD
4 +1nonmaleficencecc in nyc


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
non-malfeasance


Explanation:
colloquially known as "do no harm"

JaneD
Sweden
Local time: 18:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  B D Finch
17 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  LaraBarnett
52 mins
  -> Thanks Lara

neutral  rkillings: Is doing no harm the same as doing no evil? Does mens rea apply to both?
23 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
nonmaleficence


Explanation:
IMO... ;-)

non-malfaisance n. f.
Domaine(s) : - médecine
English non-maleficence
Définition : Principe d'éthique médicale selon lequel on ne doit pas nuire à autrui, que ce soit de façon délibérée ou par inadvertance.

http://www.granddictionnaire.com

On the English side, here's a medical definition from medilexicon:
nonmaleficence
1. The ethical principle of doing no harm, based on the Hippocratic maxim, primum non nocere, first do no harm.

http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=60976

Here's a quote from the "Medical Ethics" Wiki:
The concept of non-maleficence is embodied by the phrase, "first, do no harm," or the Latin, primum non nocere.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_ethics#Non-Maleficence

Also see:
Nonmaleficence, which derives from the maxim, is one of the principal precepts of medical ethics that all medical students are taught in medical school and is a fundamental principle for emergency medical services around the world.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primum_non_nocere

From the University of California Regents:
"Beneficence vs. Nonmaleficence"
http://missinglink.ucsf.edu/lm/ethics/Content Pages/fast_fac...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2012-02-18 20:29:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

@ ormiston: On second thought, I agree... I would probably use "non-maleficence" [with hyphen]. ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs (2012-02-18 22:15:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also for your consideration, since the context is medical ("an article written by & for doctors"):

nonmaleficence [non-mah-lef´ĭ-sens]
a principle of bioethics that asserts an obligation not to inflict harm intentionally. It is useful in dealing with difficult issues surrounding the terminally or seriously ill and injured. Some philosophers combine nonmaleficence and beneficence, considering them a single principle.

Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
nonmaleficence
Medical ethics A central guiding principle of the ethical practice of medicine, first expressed by Hippocrates, and translated into Latin as primum non nocere, first do no harm
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/nonmaleficen...



cc in nyc
Local time: 12:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 11
Grading comment
thank you for all this. I still wonder slightly if the less flowery Hippocratic maxim 'do no harm' would be more familiar even to doctors!
Notes to answerer
Asker: I have encountered both hence my posting. This is an article written by & for doctors . Non(hyphen) maleficence does look nicer to me.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  rkillings: Given the usual meaning of malfeasance, the rarer 'maleficence' seems better, even if the OED defines it too as evil-doing with intent.
18 hrs
  -> Thank you. Plus "non-maleficence" (or "nonmaleficence") is in the medical dictionaries.
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (1): LaraBarnett


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Changes made by editors
Feb 21, 2012 - Changes made by cc in nyc:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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