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patin de sûreté

English translation: (rubber) outsole pad

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:patin de sûreté
English translation:(rubber) outsole pad
Entered by: French Foodie
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19:58 Oct 7, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Sports / Fitness / Recreation / cycling shoes
French term or phrase: patin de sûreté
In reference to cycling shoes

Semelle rigide, 2 patins de sûreté empêchent l'usure prématurée de la semelle

Some kind of pad on the sole, like a no-slip pad, but for reinforcement?
French Foodie
Local time: 21:39
rubber sole (???)
Explanation:
Not to be confused with the homonymic Beatles album.

A "patin" on a shoe is the rubber sole bonded to the leather sole you want to preserve.

However, I don't understand the relevance on cycling shoes, assuming these are racing cyclist's shoes as I know them, i.e. which have metal clips that attach to the pedals. Since the only real point of contact with the pedal is the clip, the soles are hardly likely to wear, I should have thought. Mine certainly didn't when I used to race. However, it is possible that such soles might be bonded 'fore and aft" of the pedal clip.

Or maybe these are for mountain bikes and the like, where things may be different.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 55 mins (2004-10-07 22:53:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I am simply assuming these are rubber. They might not be, but rubber - as opposed to leather - would better merit the \"de sûreté\" label since they would afford better grip.

On street shoes, such a \"patin\" is known as a \"half sole\", i.e. it covers the front part of the sole, stopping short of the arch area and not covering the heel. Since cycling shoes have no heels, they might possibly require two \"half soles\", one for the front part and one for the heel, but this would assume they are being used for walking in (not comfortable).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 8 mins (2004-10-07 23:06:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I see you\'re updating the Decathlon UK webpages, by the look of it, to make them match the French!
http://www.decathlon.co.uk/ukstore/produit.asp?int_DeptId=25...
http://www.decathlon.fr/Magasin/produit.asp?int_DeptId=25327...

Again, maybe you should drop into your local Decathlon store and have a look at the RC600 shoe to see exactly what they are talking about (negotiate a discount on your next purchases while you\'re at it).
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 21:39
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone for their help, a special thanks to Nikki for the great link, but in the end the kudoz go to Bourth for giving me the push I needed to call Decathlon - for that really was the only way to solve this particular problem. In the end, I went with "rubber outsole pad", based on the salesperson's description and similar descriptions I found on sites for cycling and other sports shoes.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4rubber sole (???)
xxxBourth
3safety sole
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
2safety pads
Sophieanne
1safety slip-sole
xxxAmandine


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
patin de sûreté
safety slip-sole


Explanation:
A wild guess...

xxxAmandine
Local time: 22:39
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
patin de sûreté
safety pads


Explanation:
guessing...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 2 mins (2004-10-07 21:00:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or anti-aging pads?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 3 mins (2004-10-07 21:01:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

should read anti-ageing of course

Sophieanne
United States
Local time: 12:39
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
patin de sûreté
rubber sole (???)


Explanation:
Not to be confused with the homonymic Beatles album.

A "patin" on a shoe is the rubber sole bonded to the leather sole you want to preserve.

However, I don't understand the relevance on cycling shoes, assuming these are racing cyclist's shoes as I know them, i.e. which have metal clips that attach to the pedals. Since the only real point of contact with the pedal is the clip, the soles are hardly likely to wear, I should have thought. Mine certainly didn't when I used to race. However, it is possible that such soles might be bonded 'fore and aft" of the pedal clip.

Or maybe these are for mountain bikes and the like, where things may be different.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 55 mins (2004-10-07 22:53:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I am simply assuming these are rubber. They might not be, but rubber - as opposed to leather - would better merit the \"de sûreté\" label since they would afford better grip.

On street shoes, such a \"patin\" is known as a \"half sole\", i.e. it covers the front part of the sole, stopping short of the arch area and not covering the heel. Since cycling shoes have no heels, they might possibly require two \"half soles\", one for the front part and one for the heel, but this would assume they are being used for walking in (not comfortable).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 8 mins (2004-10-07 23:06:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I see you\'re updating the Decathlon UK webpages, by the look of it, to make them match the French!
http://www.decathlon.co.uk/ukstore/produit.asp?int_DeptId=25...
http://www.decathlon.fr/Magasin/produit.asp?int_DeptId=25327...

Again, maybe you should drop into your local Decathlon store and have a look at the RC600 shoe to see exactly what they are talking about (negotiate a discount on your next purchases while you\'re at it).


xxxBourth
Local time: 21:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 114
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone for their help, a special thanks to Nikki for the great link, but in the end the kudoz go to Bourth for giving me the push I needed to call Decathlon - for that really was the only way to solve this particular problem. In the end, I went with "rubber outsole pad", based on the salesperson's description and similar descriptions I found on sites for cycling and other sports shoes.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
patin de sûreté
safety sole


Explanation:
Consult the sites of major cycling shoe manufacturers, viz., www.sidiusa.com www.nike.com
Etc.

You need to be able to visualise what is meant by “XXX” for the particular model concerned.
“Safety sole” might be a safe translation, if you excuse the pun, but I think you need to see the beast itself if you wish to have a more descriptive rendering.

On this site for example, http://www.rocket7.com/rocket7/cycling-c450i.html the safety element of the sole comprises “durable rubber outer strip and heel pad”, the heel pad being replaceable for longer life of the product.


Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 21:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 14
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