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logique aval

English translation: downstream

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:aval
English translation:downstream
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02:23 Oct 19, 2000
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Tech/Engineering
French term or phrase: logique aval
Both German and French use special technical terms to talk of the relative position of circuit elements.

For example, suppose you are speaking of hi-fi system components, and consider the amplifier to be "downstream" from the source (e.g. CD). Then in German you could call it a "nachgeschaltete Komponente" and in French, "unité aval" and it is understood that the "downstream" components are meant.

The question I have is this: in English it is common to speak of "downstream" and "upstream" where piping systems of any kind (hydraulics, fuel, compressor systems etc.) are concerned, and also in electrical power distribution. But what about electronics? Does the same hold? It sounds strange to me, for some reason.
Ed Friesen
"Upstream" seems fine
Explanation:
I'll admit right away, I am no expert in this field. But a little research shows that the word "downstream" is used extensively in many different contexts in English.

This is not quite what you mean, but here they are talking about electronic signals, using the terms "downstream" and "upstream":

"As an ISP, if you support dedicated access customers, consider using separate routers for upstream traffic (up to the Internet) and downstream traffic (services you provide to the other ISPs, businesses and customers connected to you). Use of separate routers protects the "uplink" to the Internet in case there are router or other service problems with the "downlink". This will help to ensure that you maintain access to the Internet for your users. "
http://wint.decsy.ru/internet/digital/v0000212.htm

Here is a text that talks about elementary electronic components:

"Some devices are designed in such a way that they will survive almost anything. A series diode would protect against
reverse polarity. Alternatively, a large parallel diode with upstream current limiting resistor or PTC thermistor, and
fuses, fusable resistors, or IC protectors would cut off current before the parallel diode or circuit board traces have
time to vaporize. A crowbar circuit (zener to trigger an SCR) could be used to protect against reasonable overvoltage. "
http://fribble.cie.rpi.edu/~repairfaq/REPAIR/F_aapsfaq.html

Here is another one:

"Also be aware that the Adcom is quite sensitive, revealing any faults in upstream electronics."
http://www.audioreview.com/reviews/Amplifier/product_3525.sh...

This one talks about noise from electronic components upstream:

" The noise floor of an amplifier by itself is usually not obviously audible in a typical room (unless you are standing right next to a speaker). However, the remaining components in a system (preamp, equalizer, processor, etc.) each add in some noise. So, the total system noise (when no music is playing) might be objectionable. If this is a serious problem, a device called a noise gate can be used. Such a device is essentially a "squelch" which is wired in just before the power amps (or electronic crossover in multi-way systems). The device is basically cuts noise from upstream components when no music is playing. (...)"
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/joe_roberts/amp.htm

And again:

"In that realm it is also not a terribly forgiving amp, as it showed any harshness or problems up stream in the electronics or downstream to the speakers."
http://www.soundstage.com/revequip/staff09.htm

So it seems to me that the terms are allright to use in the electronic field as well. But once again, I am no expert...
Selected response from:

Louise Atfield
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na"Downstream" seems fine for "aval"Louise Atfield
na"Upstream" seems fineLouise Atfield


  

Answers


3 hrs
"Upstream" seems fine


Explanation:
I'll admit right away, I am no expert in this field. But a little research shows that the word "downstream" is used extensively in many different contexts in English.

This is not quite what you mean, but here they are talking about electronic signals, using the terms "downstream" and "upstream":

"As an ISP, if you support dedicated access customers, consider using separate routers for upstream traffic (up to the Internet) and downstream traffic (services you provide to the other ISPs, businesses and customers connected to you). Use of separate routers protects the "uplink" to the Internet in case there are router or other service problems with the "downlink". This will help to ensure that you maintain access to the Internet for your users. "
http://wint.decsy.ru/internet/digital/v0000212.htm

Here is a text that talks about elementary electronic components:

"Some devices are designed in such a way that they will survive almost anything. A series diode would protect against
reverse polarity. Alternatively, a large parallel diode with upstream current limiting resistor or PTC thermistor, and
fuses, fusable resistors, or IC protectors would cut off current before the parallel diode or circuit board traces have
time to vaporize. A crowbar circuit (zener to trigger an SCR) could be used to protect against reasonable overvoltage. "
http://fribble.cie.rpi.edu/~repairfaq/REPAIR/F_aapsfaq.html

Here is another one:

"Also be aware that the Adcom is quite sensitive, revealing any faults in upstream electronics."
http://www.audioreview.com/reviews/Amplifier/product_3525.sh...

This one talks about noise from electronic components upstream:

" The noise floor of an amplifier by itself is usually not obviously audible in a typical room (unless you are standing right next to a speaker). However, the remaining components in a system (preamp, equalizer, processor, etc.) each add in some noise. So, the total system noise (when no music is playing) might be objectionable. If this is a serious problem, a device called a noise gate can be used. Such a device is essentially a "squelch" which is wired in just before the power amps (or electronic crossover in multi-way systems). The device is basically cuts noise from upstream components when no music is playing. (...)"
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/joe_roberts/amp.htm

And again:

"In that realm it is also not a terribly forgiving amp, as it showed any harshness or problems up stream in the electronics or downstream to the speakers."
http://www.soundstage.com/revequip/staff09.htm

So it seems to me that the terms are allright to use in the electronic field as well. But once again, I am no expert...

Louise Atfield
PRO pts in pair: 300
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3 hrs
"Downstream" seems fine for "aval"


Explanation:
Oops! Sorry, I just realised that the word you were specifically looking at in your title was "aval", so the translation of course would be "downstream". "Upstream" would be for a circuit component "en amont". But the explanation and the examples would be the same as the ones I just sent.

Louise Atfield
PRO pts in pair: 300
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