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English translation: French caption grammar

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14:27 May 18, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering / brick and tile making
French term or phrase: missing word?
This sentence is a caption for a photo I have never seen. It is for an old brick and tile works that has bene converted into a museum.

Tuilier édifiant, en briques, la structure portante la fournée.

Shouldn't there be a 'de' or 'pour' between portante and fournée. Does it make sense to anyone as it is? The tile/brick maker is contructing the load-bearing structure out of bricks obviously, but why is la fournée tacked on at the end without a preposition?

Any ideas?

TIA


Sheila
Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 17:39
English translation:French caption grammar
Explanation:
Tuilier édifiant, en briques, la structure portante la fournée.

No: in French, this is the way a caption can be written. It could also be like this within a sentence. It means that the kiln-bearing structure is being shown in the photograph.
"...with the kiln-bearing structure" [If kiln is how you are translating fournée] My explanation is just structural
In architectural, artistic etc descriptions, you often see titles like this: here's another example-
Entrance view with statue of war hero.
OR
Portico with azalea pots.
Author with his prize Siamese.
Backtranslated would be:


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-18 14:41:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Portique, les plantes apportant une couleur d\'appoint

Porticio with plants that highlight the scene.

What seems to be eclipsed for an English reader is just French structure;
Tuilier édifiant, en briques, [avec] la structure [qui porte] la fournée.
That would make it easier to understand versus English structure, right? Well, the gloss above with the parenthesis is structurally equivalent to your original phrase.





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-18 14:44:50 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

no, it would have to be

structure porteuse [de] la fournée

but the translation would still be as I have pointed out.
Selected response from:

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Grading comment
Thanks, Jane, that's what I suspected. I just wondered why the preposition wasn't there.
Sorry about the confusion.
Sheila
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5French caption grammarJane Lamb-Ruiz


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
French caption grammar


Explanation:
Tuilier édifiant, en briques, la structure portante la fournée.

No: in French, this is the way a caption can be written. It could also be like this within a sentence. It means that the kiln-bearing structure is being shown in the photograph.
"...with the kiln-bearing structure" [If kiln is how you are translating fournée] My explanation is just structural
In architectural, artistic etc descriptions, you often see titles like this: here's another example-
Entrance view with statue of war hero.
OR
Portico with azalea pots.
Author with his prize Siamese.
Backtranslated would be:


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-18 14:41:30 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Portique, les plantes apportant une couleur d\'appoint

Porticio with plants that highlight the scene.

What seems to be eclipsed for an English reader is just French structure;
Tuilier édifiant, en briques, [avec] la structure [qui porte] la fournée.
That would make it easier to understand versus English structure, right? Well, the gloss above with the parenthesis is structurally equivalent to your original phrase.





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-18 14:44:50 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

no, it would have to be

structure porteuse [de] la fournée

but the translation would still be as I have pointed out.

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 8576
Grading comment
Thanks, Jane, that's what I suspected. I just wondered why the preposition wasn't there.
Sorry about the confusion.
Sheila
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