KudoZ home » French to English » Tech/Engineering

selfique

English translation: inductive [when describing electrical loads, as distinct from usual translation of: self-inductive]

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:selfique
English translation:inductive [when describing electrical loads, as distinct from usual translation of: self-inductive]
Entered by: Tony M
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

10:13 Apr 20, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
French term or phrase: selfique
Cos 0,7 à 1 selfique.
Parrot
Spain
Local time: 15:33
cos 0.7 to 1 inductive
Explanation:
Since you're obviously doing something to do with power and power-supplies, this seems to me to be the likely answer.

When dealing with high-powered equipment, not only is the aboslute power consumption critical, but also what we call the 'phase angle' of it; if you want a technical explanation, e-mail me! So I reckon that's where the cos... bit comes in [angles and things...]

as for inductive --- a load that has a phase angle may be either inductive or capacitive, though with motors and things, inductive is of course much more common!

So there you are, that's what I reckon it is
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 15:33
Grading comment
I'll accept this by the higher probability. Two down and six to go.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
nacos 0.7 to 1 inductive
Tony M
naCos 0,7 to 1 self-inductive.
1964


  

Answers


1 hr
Cos 0,7 to 1 self-inductive.


Explanation:
I am not sure at all.


1964
Turkey
Local time: 17:33
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish
PRO pts in pair: 294

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: 'self-inductive' doesn't really have any meaning when discussing a power-factor, which is usually described as either 'inductive' or 'capacitive'
5007 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs
cos 0.7 to 1 inductive


Explanation:
Since you're obviously doing something to do with power and power-supplies, this seems to me to be the likely answer.

When dealing with high-powered equipment, not only is the aboslute power consumption critical, but also what we call the 'phase angle' of it; if you want a technical explanation, e-mail me! So I reckon that's where the cos... bit comes in [angles and things...]

as for inductive --- a load that has a phase angle may be either inductive or capacitive, though with motors and things, inductive is of course much more common!

So there you are, that's what I reckon it is

Tony M
France
Local time: 15:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14160
Grading comment
I'll accept this by the higher probability. Two down and six to go.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
  -> Thanks, Heathcliff! (just came across this old question!)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Jan 5, 2015 - Changes made by Tony M:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/14723">Tony M's</a> old entry - "selfique" » "inductive [when describing electrical loads, as distinct from usual translation of: self-inductive"


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search