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faux pas de personnes

English translation: tripping hazard

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:faux pas de personnes
English translation:tripping hazard
Entered by: Amy Christie
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15:31 Dec 27, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering / health and safety
French term or phrase: faux pas de personnes
Health and safety:
(areas to be painted in yellow/black)
Pour la signalisation des endroits dangereux tels que marches d'escaliers, trous, lieux presentant un risque de choc, de faux pas de personnes ou encore un risque de chute de materieux...

(also, does choc remain shock?)

Thank you
Amy Christie
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:05
tripping hazard OR danger of tripping
Explanation:
'Trip hazard' is a word I've come across in H&S contexts, and I think 'risque de...' can often translate nicely as '...hazard';

'choc' seems to me likely to mean 'collision', e.g. from an errant fork-lift etc. --- or maybe it means 'bumping into things' (yourself); I reckon 'collision hazard' is probably safest, unless your other context makes it clearer...?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 46 mins (2003-12-27 17:17:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, Rita\'s got a good point there --- \'choc\' might well be referring to electric shock (although I\'d have expected électrocution\' or something similar)

Certainly though, if this is FLOOR marking, I\'d have thought that was less likely, simply because electrical shock hazards are usually better marked than that!

Hopefully, Asker\'s wider context may make this clear!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 54 mins (2003-12-27 21:25:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In the light of Asker\'s confirmation of lack of further context, I can only re-state my pretty firm conviction that given the nature of the other hazards mentioned, all of which relate to moving onto floor areas where some \'mechanical\' danger exists, I feel that the \'choc\' is LESS likely to be electrical (I\'ve never actually come across it used in exactly this context, albeit in my rather limited experience of this field), and more likely to be something to do with collision (either with moving objects, plant etc. or just possibly \"bumping into things\" like banging head on low beams, etc.)

A quick Google search reveals almost all instances involving ELECTRIC shock using \'choc électrique\', whereas there are a few hits using \'risque de choc\' alone in a meaning that is clearly related to colliding with things.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs 5 mins (2003-12-27 21:36:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A quick Google threw up a number of hits for tripping and collision hazards, including:

\"...slipping, tripping, and collision hazards ... Signs should be posted on doors opening into ...

www.vcds.forces.gc.ca/dsafeg/pubs/dndp42/42ch04_e.asp

\"Isolate slip, trip, fall or collision areas with safety tape
and or signage until hazard is removed.\"

www.eduweb.vic.gov.au/hrweb/ohs/pdfs/fa_man.pdf
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 20:05
Grading comment
Thank you Dusty. I found many refs to 'tripping hazard' eg. http://www.speedysigns.com/signs/Caution_signs.asp and in other parts of this website (thanks Kate!). I will put something along the lines of '...places posing a risk of collision, a tripping hazard or a risk of falling material...'
Thank you for the thorough explanation and research. Thank you also to everyone else for helping; it is very much appreciated.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5of tripping
William Stein
3 +4tripping hazard OR danger of tripping
Tony M
4 +3stumbling hazard, risk
cjohnstone
3 +2danger of electrical shockRHELLER
4tripping hazard (Slips and Trips)
olganet
3(people) shocks or false steps
Francis MARC
3false step
Monique Laville


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
stumbling hazard, risk


Explanation:
for choc would use bumping into, colliding into, hitting, according to your sentence

cjohnstone
France
Local time: 20:05
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1632

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  roneill
1 hr
  -> thks

agree  writeaway
3 hrs
  -> thks

agree  Parrot: The usual sign is "watch your step"
5 hrs
  -> right you are
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
(people) shocks or false steps


Explanation:
faux pas = ref. Webster's

Francis MARC
Lithuania
Local time: 21:05
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 6500
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
choc
danger of electrical shock


Explanation:
are you referring to high-voltage areas? they are usually marked by a sign in yellow and black with a lightning symbol (U.S.)

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 12:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1582

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kate Hudson
15 mins

agree  NancyLynn
4 hrs
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
of tripping


Explanation:
I think the it's "un risque de...faux pas de personnes" = places that might people might trip on
As for "choc", I would "places that people might bump into or trip over (or be hit by falling objects)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 37 mins (2003-12-27 16:08:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I agree with Dusty about \"risk of collision\". Maybe the safest bet would be: places where people might suffer collisions, trip and fall, or be hit by falling objects.

William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 13:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1737

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, that's the way I read it too, William!
8 mins

agree  roneill
1 hr

agree  xxxsarahl: or tripping the alarm, un autre genre de trip.
3 hrs
  -> Sounds like an alarming trip, maaan!

agree  NancyLynn: have a nice trip, we'll see you next fall :-)
4 hrs

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
6 hrs
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46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
tripping hazard (Slips and Trips)


Explanation:
tripping hazard - pour le faux pas, fall hazard - pour le choc

U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety & Health Administration
Federal Registers
Safety Standards for Fall Protection in the Construction Industry - 59:40672-40753
http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_tabl...

olganet
Local time: 14:05
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 168
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50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
false step


Explanation:
People taking a false step,
or as the
the grand dictionnaire states, slipping:
Domaine(s) : - sécurité cause des accidents du travail

français anglais
faux pas n. m. slip




Monique Laville
Italy
Local time: 20:05
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 6
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
tripping hazard OR danger of tripping


Explanation:
'Trip hazard' is a word I've come across in H&S contexts, and I think 'risque de...' can often translate nicely as '...hazard';

'choc' seems to me likely to mean 'collision', e.g. from an errant fork-lift etc. --- or maybe it means 'bumping into things' (yourself); I reckon 'collision hazard' is probably safest, unless your other context makes it clearer...?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 46 mins (2003-12-27 17:17:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, Rita\'s got a good point there --- \'choc\' might well be referring to electric shock (although I\'d have expected électrocution\' or something similar)

Certainly though, if this is FLOOR marking, I\'d have thought that was less likely, simply because electrical shock hazards are usually better marked than that!

Hopefully, Asker\'s wider context may make this clear!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 54 mins (2003-12-27 21:25:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In the light of Asker\'s confirmation of lack of further context, I can only re-state my pretty firm conviction that given the nature of the other hazards mentioned, all of which relate to moving onto floor areas where some \'mechanical\' danger exists, I feel that the \'choc\' is LESS likely to be electrical (I\'ve never actually come across it used in exactly this context, albeit in my rather limited experience of this field), and more likely to be something to do with collision (either with moving objects, plant etc. or just possibly \"bumping into things\" like banging head on low beams, etc.)

A quick Google search reveals almost all instances involving ELECTRIC shock using \'choc électrique\', whereas there are a few hits using \'risque de choc\' alone in a meaning that is clearly related to colliding with things.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs 5 mins (2003-12-27 21:36:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A quick Google threw up a number of hits for tripping and collision hazards, including:

\"...slipping, tripping, and collision hazards ... Signs should be posted on doors opening into ...

www.vcds.forces.gc.ca/dsafeg/pubs/dndp42/42ch04_e.asp

\"Isolate slip, trip, fall or collision areas with safety tape
and or signage until hazard is removed.\"

www.eduweb.vic.gov.au/hrweb/ohs/pdfs/fa_man.pdf

Tony M
France
Local time: 20:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14157
Grading comment
Thank you Dusty. I found many refs to 'tripping hazard' eg. http://www.speedysigns.com/signs/Caution_signs.asp and in other parts of this website (thanks Kate!). I will put something along the lines of '...places posing a risk of collision, a tripping hazard or a risk of falling material...'
Thank you for the thorough explanation and research. Thank you also to everyone else for helping; it is very much appreciated.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kate Hudson: see : www.speedysigns.com/signs/SAFETY_Tripping_Hazard.asp
16 mins
  -> Thanks Kate! What a useful reference to find...!

agree  roneill
51 mins
  -> Thanks, Rónat!

agree  Valentini Mellas
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Valentini!

agree  NancyLynn: on further reflection, because of the description of the other hazards, I believe collision is more likely. However, Rita's answer could be correct, given illustrations etc
4 hrs
  -> Ooh Nancy, the only hazards round here are your puns! But like you, I rather feel the surrounding context suggests 'floor-based' hazards. Thanks a lot!
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