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fragment de stuc de céramique

English translation: I think you've got it almost exactly right (see below)

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10:51 Jul 30, 2000
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
French term or phrase: fragment de stuc de céramique
In the following sentence am I right in thinking that "un fragment de stuc de céramique" should really read "un fragment de stuc ou de céramique"?

"Les vols vont du petit larcin, consistant à prélever un fragment de stuc de céramique ou un éclat de marbre à titre de souvenir, jusqu'au vol à but lucratif, affectant surtout les peintures".

I have translated therefore translated the sentence thus:

Thefts range from petty theft, where a small piece of pottery or stucco or a fragment of marble is carried off as a souvenir, to profit-making theft, which primarily targets paintings.

I have found that "stucco" refers to "plaster" whereas "pottery" is "ceramic", unless this context is referring to a piece of pottery that as been plastered. I would be grateful for anyone's opinion.
Helen
English translation:I think you've got it almost exactly right (see below)
Explanation:
"Stucco" (referring to decorative plaster-work, the exterior finish for walls, etc.) is the same word in English, of course. However, stucco and pottery aren't the same thing, and "pottery stucco" or "ceramic stucco" doesn't make a lot of sense. In this context, I think you're right to assume the word "ou" (or, possibly, a comma) was omitted from the French, and that three items (pieces of pottery and stucco, and fragments of marble) are involved. -- The only change I'd suggest in your sentence would be to use "grand theft" or "grand larceny" (which, in U.S. / U.K. legal parlance, refers to the theft of items of major value, usually with a view to converting them to major amounts of cash). This usage would also preserve the parallelism with "petty theft." -- Best, HC
Selected response from:

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 21:28
Grading comment
Thank you very much - your comments are always very helpful. Thanks also for correcting "profit-making theft" - I appreciate any criticism/amendments you find.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naI think you've got it almost exactly right (see below)Heathcliff
nasee below
Laura Gentili
nasee below
Laura Gentili
nasee below
Laura Gentili
nasee belowTelesforo Fernandez
napieces of ceramic stuccoTelesforo Fernandez


  

Answers


14 mins
pieces of ceramic stucco


Explanation:
stucco is ornamental piece, it is an italian word.

Telesforo Fernandez
Local time: 09:58
PRO pts in pair: 216
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26 mins
see below


Explanation:
You have used ' profit making theft " instead it would be better to write " theft for pecuniary purposes"

Telesforo Fernandez
Local time: 09:58
PRO pts in pair: 216
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41 mins
see below


Explanation:
I agree with you, a stuc cannot be made of ceramic. However, I think here the author used the term °stuc° in a wider sense, meaning decoration.I would translate it as °fragment of a ceramic decoration°. BTW, pottery and ceramic are 2 different things: pottery is modelled clay, dried and fired in a high temperature furnace.
Ceramic can be made of clay, but also of other materials.

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 06:28
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 49
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51 mins
see below


Explanation:
I just wanted to add something about pottery versus ceramic: in Italian and in French there is a difference between terre cuite (poterie) and céramique, but I think the English term °pottery° has a wider meaning which can embrace both.

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 06:28
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 49
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
I think you've got it almost exactly right (see below)


Explanation:
"Stucco" (referring to decorative plaster-work, the exterior finish for walls, etc.) is the same word in English, of course. However, stucco and pottery aren't the same thing, and "pottery stucco" or "ceramic stucco" doesn't make a lot of sense. In this context, I think you're right to assume the word "ou" (or, possibly, a comma) was omitted from the French, and that three items (pieces of pottery and stucco, and fragments of marble) are involved. -- The only change I'd suggest in your sentence would be to use "grand theft" or "grand larceny" (which, in U.S. / U.K. legal parlance, refers to the theft of items of major value, usually with a view to converting them to major amounts of cash). This usage would also preserve the parallelism with "petty theft." -- Best, HC

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 21:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 953
Grading comment
Thank you very much - your comments are always very helpful. Thanks also for correcting "profit-making theft" - I appreciate any criticism/amendments you find.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
see below


Explanation:
I think Heathcliff is absolutely right (as usual), probably the author forgot a comma between "de stuc" and "ceramique", so no need to find complicated explanations of this misterious "stuc de céramique"!

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 06:28
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 49
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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